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EDD7 D24D3E6 4 

California Slate Litxary 






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? ' A/ 



The Special Organ of "Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co. "--Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 



Prio» p»p Copy, IS C»»t».l 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1SS6 



' Annual Subscription (in told , S7.50. 



g^n fs^®]q S(5 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 27. 



SAN FEANOISOO, SATUEDAY, JANUAEY 27, 1877. 



No. 1. 



oiiii'i". of i in- Sun Francisco News l.ci i<t, < hlun Mail, Calif or- 
uia Mall Bait, South aide Merchant street. No. 1307 to tiir», San Francisco. 

GOLD BARS-JB0@900-Sii.ver Bars— 3(ff 12 $ cent, disc. Treasury 
ura selling at MJ. Buying, 93£ Mexican Dollars, 1 per 
prem. Trade Dollar s, 1 (g 2 per cent, preiu. 

«W Exchange on New York, 45-100@'i per cent, for Gold ; Currency, 5? ; 
l*.-r ct- nt, premium. On London, Bankers, 49fA<§ IwmL ; Commercial, 
49}@S0d. Paris , 5 francs \»jt dollar. Telegram s, }$'$ per cent. 

«3" Latest price of Gold at New York, Jan. 26th, at 3 p.m., 1064.. Latest 
price of Sterling, 483@486. 

«3" Price of Money here, 9@1 per cent, per month— bank rate. In the 
open market, l@li- Demand active. 

Latest from the Merchants' Exchange. — New York, January 
96, 1876.— Gold opened at 106i; 11 a. m., at 1061 ; 3 p.m., KXVJ. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1867, 113| ; 1881, 112$. Sterling Ex r 
ehaii"<\ 4 84 r« 4 sii, short. Pacific Mail, 25jJ. Wheat, $1 50@'l 66. West- 
ern Union, 771- Hides, dry, 23»(ff24, quiet. Oil — Sperm, SI 40@J?1 45. 
Winter Bleached, 81 86 (5 1 70. Whale, f0@75 ; Winter Bleached, 
Wool-Spring, fine, 20f«?28 ; Burry, 14(218; Pulled, 25@38. 
Fall Clips, 17@20 ; Burn-, 17@20. London, January 26th. — Liverpool 
Wheat Market, 10s. 8d.@10s. lid. Club, lls.@lls. 4d. United States 
Bonds, 107$. Consols. % 1-16. 



READY FOR TRIAL. 

On Wednesday we shall be ready to go to trial with the greatest of 
our libel cases. There has been no unnecessary delay on our part. Three 
or four weeks ago the Grand Jury found the indictments, which we de- 
sired they should find, because we desired the trial to be hi public, and 
already we are prepared with our defence. When that is all before our 
fellow citizens it will be conceded that we have used marked diligence in 
getting no much ready in so brief a period. By the evidence we shall ad- 
duce, as judged by the whole people, we are content to stand or fall. The 
libel to be tried first is the broadest in its language, and the most danger- 
ous in its wording. When one receives such a letter as we did from Mel- 
bourne; wheu the bank here disastrously fails, goes into the hands of a re- 
ceiver, and he reports as he did, one is liable to grow a little lax in the 
fihraaeology necessary to describe such things. That is the particular 
ibel selected, of which we make no complaint. It is best that the larger, 
which includes the smaller, should be encountered at the beginning. We 
are fully ready to encounter it; and whilst we make no predictions as to 
what the findmsrs of a petit jury may be, we do repose the utmost con- 
fidence in the overwhelming character of our evidence, and in the final 
judgment of our patrons. We are sure that when the trial is over the 
general verdict will be, that never was there a newspaper article more 
completely justified, nor one more imperatively demanded in the public 
interest. • 

Steamers for China and Japan.— This week's issue of the Commercial 
Herald has the following editorial paragraph : We herewith give correct 
litmus of our exports only to China and Japan, by steamer, for the year 
1876. Reports of the inward trade have not yet been perfected. The 
Pacific Mail Company carried the following quantities of merchandise to 
the ports specified, viz.: To Hongkong, 7,867 tons; Shanghai, 685 tons; 
Yokohama, 1,310 tons; Hiogo, 195 tons; Nagasaki, 133 tons— total, 10,190 
tons. The amounts of treasure forwarded were: To Hongkong, §4,290,- 
527; Yokohama, §185,773; and Hiogo, §118,2:53— total, §4,589,533. During 
the same year the steamers of the O. and O. S. S. Co. took away 12,562 
tons of freight to Hongkong, 590 to Shanghai, 827 to Yokohama, 149 to 
Hiogo, and 43 to Nagasaki— total, 14,171 tons. The treasure exports by 
this line were §4,627.287 to Hongkong, §215,362 to Shanghai, §731,377 to 
Yokohoma, and §205,792 to Hiogo— total, §5,809,818. Total merchandise 
exports by both lines, 24,361 tons. Total treasure by both lines, §10,399,- 
351— a sum sufficiently large to indicate a growing and prosperous trade 
with China and Japan. 

Finance. — Nothing of note has transpired this week. Money remains 
very abundant, and no signs of any change are visible. Loans can be 
effected in large amounts against gold collaterals at from 5 to 6 per cent. 
Our good local securities are gradually absorbed at high figures. Bonds 
are scarce, and command extraordinary prices. Silver remains steady at 
581 pence in London. Fine bars are quotable at 2S to 3 per cent, discount. 
Mexican and Trade Dollars are 1£ to 2 per cent, premium. 



Mr. F. Algar. No. 8 Clements Lane, London, Is authorized to 

receive subscriptions, advertisements, communications, etc., for this paper, 

teytjjr^* Published with this weelc's issue a Four- 
Hl»i «* •> Page I*ostsci*ipt. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF FACT AND THOUGHT. 

Stocks. — The horse struck in the 1650 foot level of the Con. Virginia, 
in the early part of the week, was sufficient to cause a serious depression 
all along the line. It is therefore satisfactory to know that the 
obstacle was a very small one, and that rich ore has again been 
reached. The effect of the news was at once apparent, Con. Virginia 
touching 491 yesterday afternoon. The market took an upward turn yes- 
terdas', and closed with a strong tendency to go still higher. Our compila- 
tion of the week's prices in another column is the most accurate table of 
the kind prepared. It shows each day the rise and fall of every stock 
called in the three Boards, and is acknowledged as an indubitable autho- 
rity on prices. It has always been a feature of the New* Letter, and at- 
tention is only called to it as a reminder to those who do not read their 
paper carefully. 

Beerbohm's Telegrams.— London and Liverpool, Jan. 26th, 1877. — 
Floating Cargoes, heavy; Cargoes on Passage, very dull; Mark Lane, 
slow; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 50s.; California Off Coast, 53s@53s. 6d.; 
do. nearly due, 53s. 6d.; do. just shipped, 55s.; English and French 
Country Markets, cheaper. Liverpool, dull; California Club, 10s. lld.@ 
lis. 4d.; do. average. 10s. 9d.@lls.: Bed Western Spring, 10s. 3(L @ 
10s. lid. 

The ' ' Benmore, " commanded by Captain McClellan, now lying at 
the Gas Company's wharf, is one of the finest specimens of marine archi- 
tecture that has ever entered this port. She is 1,530 tons, and sits on the 
water like a duck, her lines being as graceful and beautiful as a yacht. 
She is built for speed, and Captain McClellan has found her all he could 
desire. She is owned by Nicholson, McGill & Co., of Liverpool, and is 
the crack ship of that employ. 

The Australian Mail Steamer " Zealandia's " defects have been 
remedied. The cabin accommodations now seem all that can be desired. 
Trimness of the officers is all that is needed to make the Zcalandia popu- 
lar with the traveling public. Bradley & Kulofson flattered them when 
taking their photographs. 

The ' ' Bulletin" took care to omit all mention of our last triumph 
over the enemy. Next week will show whether it has honesty enough to 
print fairly the evidence we shall adduce about its friend, companion and 
ally— the. man Clay. We shall take care that it does not overlook the 
trial, by making both Pickering and Fitch witnesses. 

Quicksilver. -- We think there is a strong indication that the 50c. 
monopoly ring is about to be dissolved and broken one month prior to the 
time agreed upon. It is not to-day safe to quote the market better than 
47ic, although 50c. is the nominal price. 

The Directors of the Hibernia Bank yesterday declared a dividend of 
8?; percent, per annum for the past six months, payable, immediately. 

The Liverpool wheat market was given yesterday at 10s 8d@10a 
lid for average California, and lis to lis 4a for club.. 



The Agenor sailed from Boston yesterday for San Francisco, and will 
be followed by the new ship Palestine. 

Brokers are buying Half Dollars at 7@7J $ cent, discount, and are 
selling them at 6^<£t6£ |? cent, discount. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Bank of San Fran- 
cisco will be held to-day. 

The coast steamers to sail to-day are the Ajax for Portland and the 
Orizaba for San Diego. 

Legal Tenders here are irregular at 94{S;94;i buying, and 94&@94$ 

selling. __ 

Trade Dollars are quoted in this market at 101 buying and 102 selling. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 27, 1877. 



FAITHFUL AMONG THE FAITHLESa 

Once in a while, in this world ^o strange, 

To lighten our sad regrets, 
We may find a " heart that is true through change," 

A heart that never forgets. 
But rare as a rose in December, 

Aa a bird in an Arctic clime, 
Is a heart that can ever remember, 

Through son-ow, and change, and time. 
Once in a while we find 'a friend 

That will cling through good and ill ; 
Whose friendship follows us e'en to the end, 

Be it up or adown the hill. 
But the heart so true and the love so tender, 

And frindsbip's faithful smile, 
Whether we dwell in sadness or splendor, 

We find but once in a while. 



THE WOMEN MEN LIKE. 
Speaking broadly, there are only two sDrts of women whom the gen- 
erality of men positively like— those who are honestly fools, and those 
who, though very far from being so, have the talent to assume the role. 
There is a comfortable belief, securely rooted in the masculine brain, that 
vanity is an exclusively feminine attribute; and it would be difficult to 
persuade them of what is nevertheless a positive fact, that for touchy and 
sensitive vanity and self-conceit no woman was ever a match for the ordi- 
nary male. It is not chiefly his appearance on which he prides himself, 
but his superior intellect, and the less of that valuable commodity he really 
possesses the more edifyingly and impressively supercilious does he be- 
come on the subject of women's minds. In truth, there is nothing lie dis- 
likes so much as a woman with a shadow of reasoning power ; and all 
those estimable persons who are laboring so earnestly in the cause of what 
they term the ' higher education of women 1 may be useful to those who 
cannot or will not marry, but are doing all that lies in their power to ren- 
der homes miserable, husbands sulky, and wives discontented. I here 
never was a greater fallacy on this earth than to suppose that the average 
man wishes for a wife as an intellectual companion: he only requires her 
to say 'O 1 ' and * Ah!' admiringly at intervals, and accord him the unrea- 
soning homage unaccountably denied him by his fellow men. Parmi les 
aveugk* le borgnt est roi. If a woman has no brains she accepts her hus- 
bands lucubrations as gospel, is totally unable to detect the fallacies of his 
reasoning or the looseness of his statistics ; and though his words are to 
her but sounds ' signifying nothing/ she takes it for granted that there is 
wisdom in them, and reveres him accordingly. Educate her to the due 
comprehension of the subjects of usual masculine interest, teach her logic, 
enable her to detect errors of reasoning and to appreciate the niceties of 
argument, and the happiness of a home is ruined ; for it is too much to 
expect of any human being, still more of a woman, who, however she may 
be educated, will still in virtue of her sex be impulsive, systematically to 
keep silence, nay, even to give an admiring assent to propositions which 
are manifestly absurd. 

But the average man resents a word implying his wife s divergence from 
his views excepting in household matters, which he calls contemptuously 
' woman's province,' and which, warned by the disastrous results produced 
by his occasional attempts at interference, he wisely leaves to her admin- 
istration. He meets her mild representation, that she cannot help hav- 
ing an opinion, with a sneer that ' of course she goes in for Woman's 
Eights, and wants a vote ; which, being a sensible woman, is about the 
last thing she would desire ; and she probably fails to see why such an 
accusation should arise from her gentle divergence of opinion on the ulti- 
mate designs of Russia, She is quiteaware that she has read and thought 
a great deal more on the subject than her husband has, and his imperative 
command to * hold her tongue and not be foolish,' fails to secure complete 
obedience. She feels aggrieved and discontented, aud inclined to wish 
herself an utter fool, like pretty Mrs. Featherbrain, who does not know 
that two and two make four. She endeavors not to express an opinion, 
but her silence is a protest which woiands her husband's aggressive vanity; 
he has an uneasy consciousness, which he would not allow torture to make 
him confess, that she is cleverer than he is, and he hates her for the su- 
periority, and snubs her to relieve himself of the feeling of it. 

But matters are not greatly improved if the wife is not an intellectual, 
but a sensible, honest, and straightforward woman. She loves her hus- 
band dearly, gives up her pleasure and her comforts for his without a 
murmur, dinies herself any little indulgence if it in any way interferes 
with his slightest whim, and keeps silence when money which should be 
spent on the house or on her comfort is squandered on his selfish amuse- 
ments. But she is honest, and cannot say that she thinks a thing either 
wise or desirable when it appears to her distinctly the reverse ; and loving 
her husband with all her heart, and being both sensible and straightfor- 
ward, she cannot refrain from expostulation when she sees him about to 
do something which appears to her to be either wrong or foolish. And 
this, showing that she does absolutely adore and blindly worship him, 
thinking that he can never be either wrong or mistaken, is a sore griev- 
ance, quite sufficient to extinguish all thought of her constant and patient 
self-abnegation. Indeed this, which is like most other supreme_ virtues its 
own reward, is seldom honored by having its existence recognized. _ Has 
she not the excessive honor, glory, and pride of being his wife ; and is not 
that sufficient to render it the duty of any mortal woman daily to thank 
Providence for her unspeakable good fortune? 

As has been already said, the women men really like are the real fools, 
and those who have the superlative talent to appear so: the former they 
love, though in a slighting, contemptuous manner, regulated chiefly by 
personal attraction ; the latter they adore, and are led unsuspecting slaves 
by the fair gaolers, who, if outwardly adoring, inwardly laugh at and de- 
spise them. The fools attract men by physical beauty, by their utter ab- 
sence of intellect, and therefore of any power of wounding the cherished 
masculine idea of mental absolutism, and by their generally kittenish and 
coaxing ways. As a rule, they are utterly devoid of any deep feeling, but 
petting and kissing are about the only occupations besides dressing and 
flirting of which they are capable ; and they have just the instinct to 
know 'that men are very amenable to the caresses of a pretty woman. It 
is true that the charm only endures while she is young and pretty ; but 
even when she is old there is the fact that she has never wounded her hus- 
band's egregious vanity as have her intellectual or her straight- forward sis- 
ters ; she has equivocated and romanced and made things generally 



pleasant, aud receives a certain amount of toleration. Moreover, she haB 
no sensitive feerrhgs, no comprehension of the value of the words justice 
or injustice; her husband has called her a fool times beyond number; 
and if he has spoken loudly or crossly she has cried, at his tone rather 
than his words; but the word itself has made little or no impression upon 
her, and the next time he gives her a careless kiss she dries her tears and 
adores him more than ever. 

The assumed fool is the mistress of the situation ; she has a compre- 
hensive brain with a distinct turn for intrigue, and both honor and truth 
are to her words and nothing more. She knows how dexterously to_flat- 
ter a man's vanity, to let him believe himself the wisest of mankind when 
in truth every word he utters is due to her direct inspiration ; she can 
with an imperturbable countenance hear him say, when some one ad- 
dresses her on a particular subject 'O, it's no use your talking to my 
wife about such things, I never can make her understand them,' while 
she is conscious that every argument he has used has been learnt directly 
from her. Her powers of invention are both unbounded and artistic. 
When a storm is seen to lower on her lord's brow she is ready with some 
pleasing fiction, some lauditory phrase of an apocryphal admirer, and she 
has her recompense in the renewed sunshine. Naturally she soon acquires 
supreme command ; and it is power which such women love, and for 
which they are willing to undergo any trouble or discomfort. She lets 
her lord know nothing but what she judges requisite, suppressing all pos- 
sible disagreeable details and softening those that must of necessity be 
known ; and she reaps her reward in an adoration which knows no bounds. 
It is true he has not the faintest conception of what he owes her, nor 
yet a suspicion of the utterly double life which his wife lives. He is 
happy, delighted, and adoring; she is sublimely contemptuous of the 
vanity of which, nevertheless, she takes such full advantage, and utterly 
careless of the affection she excites excepting in so far as it conduces to 
her own ends. She disguises her intellect as carefully as if it were a 
deadly sin, and not uufrequently passes among her husbands friends as 'a 
frivolous silly woman, but always pleasant and good-tempered ;' and it as 
hardly demonstrative of the doctrine that men like to find real intellect- 
ual companionship in women to observe that while clever women in a 
room are left to talk to each other, the fools, whether real or only as- 
sumed, whose talk is of balls, either chat of Prince's, and their serious 
conversation of scandal, have all the men around their chairs. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN. 



COLLATERAL LOAN AND SAVINGS BANK, CORNER POST AND 
KEARNY STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO- 

Incorporated Under the Laws of the State of California. 

President J. S. SPEAR, JR. I Secretary F.S.CARTER. 

Vice-President ROB'T STEVENSON. | Appraiser GEO. O. ECKER. 

nniiis Bank is prepared to loan money upon collateral secn- 

1 rities, such as iionds, Stocks, Savings Bank Books, Diamonds, Warehouse Re- 
ceipts, etc., at from l£ to 4 per cent, per month. The Bank will also receive Term 
Deposits, and allow the following rates of interest : Term Deposits of six months, 
1 per cent, per month ; Twelve months, 1J per cent, per month. 
November 4. F. S. CARTER, Secretary. 

GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Guarantee Capital $200, 000. ---Office 526 California street, 
North side, between Montgomery and Kearny streets. Office hours, from 9 a.m 
to 3 p.m. Extra hour on Saturdays from 7 to S p.h, for receiving of Deposits only 
Loans made on Real Estate and other collateral securities, at current rates of interest. 
President L. GOTTIG. | Secretary GEO. LETTE. 

DlRECTOItS. 

F. Roeding, H. Schmieden, Clias. Kohler, Ed. Kruse, Dan. Meyer, George H. Eg- 
gers, P. Spreckles, N. Van Bergen. Feb. 1. 

MARKET STREET BANK OF SAVINGS, 



President. . 
Secretary . . 



634 Market St., Opposite Palace Hotel 



THOMAS B. LEWIS. 
VV. E. LATSON. 



Interest allowed on all deposits remaining in Bank over 
thirty days. Interest on term deposits, 12 per cent, per annum. Deposits re- 
ceived from one dollar upward. No charge for Bank Book. On receipt of remit- 
tances from the interior, Bank Books or Certificates of Deposit will be forwarded or 
delivered to agent. Bank open on Saturdays till 9 o'clock p.m. October 28. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 
<*TQ£> California street, corner Webb. Capital and Re- 

OdX serve, $231,000. Deposits, $6,919,000. Directors: James de Fremery, 
President ; Albert Miller, Vice-President ; C. Adolphe Low, D. J. Oliver, Charles 
Baura, Charles Pace, Washington Bartlett, A. Campbell, Sen., George C. Potter; 
Cashier, Lovell White. Dividends for two years past have been 7.V aud 9 per cent, re- 
spectively, on ordinary and term deposits. Dividends are payable semi-annually, in 
January and July. Money loaned on real estate and on United States Bonds, or 
equi valent securities. October 30. 

PIONEER LAND AND LOAN BANK OF SAVINGS AND DEPOSIT. 

Southeast corner California aud M ontgomery streets, Safe 
Deposit Block. Incorporated 1SIS9. Guarantee Fund, 5200,000. Dividend No. 
102 payable on December 5th. Ordinary deposits receive 9 per cent. Term de- 
posits receive 12 per cent. This incorporation is in its eighth year, and refers to 
over 4.900 depositors for its successful and economical management. 

' H. KOFAHL, Cashier. 
Tnos. Gray, President. J. C. Duncan, Secretary. March 27, 

MASONIC SAVINGS AND I0AN BANK, 

No. 6 Post street, Masonic Temple, San Francisco, Cal.«- 
Moneys received on Term aud Ordinary Deposits ; dividends paid semi- 
-umuallv ; loans made on approved security. This bank solicits the patronage of all 
persons'. [March 25. J H T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, ©300,000. 

Officers: President, Jobn Parrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ■ Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. l 0ct - u - 



411 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Eusli street, above Kearny, G. Malie. Director, loans 

made on real estate aud other collateral securities at curreut rates of 



s 



A. t. Elliott, 

nip and Grain Brofcer, and Exporter of Bops, 123 Calif or. 

ma street, San Francisco. October 28. 



Jul 87, 1877. 



CALIPORN1 \ Al»\ ERTISER. 



SILENCE AND SOLITUDE. 

tar tli.-v Tin- Pu< Hud Kuttiri- nrv mvKtieata. 
\ <■ ;t\\ hi! >. h bo i*<>nie 

nr prey, X° eveI > r ,int l ;""' " f ', arl, V 
wn from birth todeith. R°* ■•■ lv Hl ' 

1 uwni fchi mty "i your 

ft law oi w herabloi n oi thl 

whm ton «"•« On v l lean n,v lonely limhe, 
. , . , , 1 neatlfl toward your breathing sides: 

• ! " ! 8 terUianriloareMthboni 

It tonmt v, than forlorn. N '""' ndcm l '""" "" wi '"' 1 ' : "" 1 ti,U ' s - 

1 wloTt.withrtnwming.yM, V "'" '> " 1 "' , " ,:,rt tl,: " liv '"' wl " " 

We shudder in the iipeeohleas tfloum ; , i ., * „ i . i . 

And when your »» ..I form. ,„., . : ro ™« "" ll £« "*™[ J***! 

Ourhei^rnufltdietogivnyeroom. J? 1,:, Vi a F! 06 V hft * i' d i 
Above the wave, above the shroud. 

d ancient audi ye wet, jw in vonr prese nce, there alone 
( .urvcn In rtona, where uuant The holy spirit calls to each; 

thought Xot t<> another, but to one, 

Wnppdyeutemr8.ahApe0unb]eat; WQ sUn ,| t0 hear your 80Unu les9 
l ^raaarul, by might oi ogee wrought. Bpeeoh. 

Egypt's shore The mysteries of the earth are then 
rerywhere Whrought into energy of days; 
That joy hath been, and u no more, Action that knows no fear of men, 
May be the desert of despair. Duty that knows no devious ways. 

Like carven stone, our joy may sit Ye show the lovely way-side rose, 
Forever, while we stand and gaze. Whose antique grace is born anew 
Till, bending all our hearts t<> it, For our Bad eyes: Grief only knows 
"We vanish like the autumn haze. How tender is the sunset's line! 

t loch of the desert ! speak to me! Heart of the Unseen! By the hands 
Ye draw me to your swelling breasts; Of these thine angels are we brought 
Through your calm eyes now first I To find thy peaceful pasturedands, 
see And drink of fountains else unsought. 

— Appkton for January, 1877. 

GROWTH OF LONDON. 

The following figures in connection with the increased rateable value 
of certain London districts is interesting: 

There are eight localities with a rateable value exceeding £1,000,000. 
Next below this group we have the Wandsworth district, with £857,422, 
followed by Plomstead and Lewisham with £718,403, and Hackney with 
£695.580, The Fulhain district has also made an advance, rising- from 
the thirty-fifth place to the twentieth, the houses being more than doubled 
and the rateable value trebled. Poplar has taken a step upward from 
the twenty-first place to the thirteenth, the houses having increased in 
number by about one-half, and the rateable value raised from £218,256 to 
£558,466. In rateable value Poplar now stands next to St. James, West- 
minster. St. George, Hanover Square, despite its fashionable repute, has 
fallen from the fifth place to the seventh, but stands second for rateable 
value, whereas it was third on that account in 1856. Its rateable value 
has gone up from £803,976 to £1,469,954, the latter being about half the 
rateable value of the City. But St. George's has lost ground since 1856, 
for at that period it had nearly three-fourths the rateable value of the 
City, although very far short in the number of houses. This wealthy 
parish does not increase greatly in the number of houses, but the average 
rateable value of a house in St. George's is exceptionably high, being £142. 
The City average is about twice as high, but we see that the average for 
all Loudon is only £55. Of course all parishes cannot rise in relative im- 
portance, but it is satisfactory to find that all the localities specified in 
the list are making some progress. A marvelous increase in rateable 
value is shown by the parish or St. John, Hampstead, the amount twenty 
years ago being only about £77,000, whereas now it is nearly £326,000. 
Yet Hampstead has only risen from the thirty-ninth place (last but one) 
to tin- thirty-third. Bethnal Green has increased its rateable value more 
than threefold, although it has fallen from the twelfth place to the six- 
teenth. 

A visit to the convict Orton, at Dartmoor, was paid on December 
22d by Mr. Guildford Onslow, Mr. Helsby, and aJMr. Stubbs, whose fam- 
ily have been tenants on the Tichborne estates for the last two hundred 
years. Instead of seeing the prisoner in the deputy-governor's office, as 
on previous occasions, the newly-appointed governor wisely insisted on 
the prison rules being observed, and the interview taking place in the or- 
dinary three -compartment room, with a warder between the convict and 
his friends. Orton was more down-hearted than on any previous occasion, 
and complained that he was treated cruelly, and expressed a hope that 
the matter would be brought before Parliament, so that there might be 
a commission of inquiry into his case. He seemed to be in good health, 
but complained of an affection of the throat and head resembling erysip- 
elas. The Home Secretary had declined to allow more than the regular 
twenty minutes, and at the expiration of that period the visitors quitted 
the prison and left for Plymouth in company with members of the Tich- 
borne Release Association. 

Useful Knowledge.— The Literary World gives off a regret that 
daily papers are not more careful in their reports. "Only last week we 
saw a report of a banquet in whtch it was stated a gentleman took the 
chair, whereas the chair was taken by a very different person." Well, 
well; but we should like to learn the process by which the L. W. dis- 
covered the real chairman was "quite different" from a gentleman. Un- 
less he made the fact tremendously patent, the way in which the decision 
was arrived at would be wrinkled indeed to all whose misfortune it is to 
move much in the "literary world" — which in this instance, and to avoid 
confusion, means the world of literature. —Fun. 



Those who are tronbled with neighbors who keep fowl should follow 
the example of the Yankee statesman who was very much annoyed at the 
havoc his next-door neighbor's poultry committed in his garden. He put 
some old hats and hay under his steps and in the stable, and when the 
fowl came to scratch they remained to lay. He has had all the fresh eggs 
he wanted this summer, and has even sold some dollars' worth to the 
owner of the hens. 



.BANKS. 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK. 

Incorporated In G«aeva, twllserlnnd, January S4th, 1*73. 
1 ipltal, K'J.IIOII.UIHI. i*ld 

. , in n ft* ii sin i nmelflco [trail- h, u< c« oi to 
on, 587 Ulaj itreel D i n I'ON and ROBERT 

» vi r 

Credit on I urope, and to traiuael evarj 

kind of Banking, Beroantllo and Ezcbangi Busuu , tie negotiate American So- 

ourlUu in Europe Deposit* ret i Ived 

Bills of Exchange Now y/ork, Philadelphia, London, Liverpool. Parle, 

1 ■ " ue . Bordi ox, Oloroo, Bruesale, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort, Geneva, 

Lausanne, Ohaux de Fonda, fteuchatel, Frlbourg, Bern. Aarn, Boleure, Baden, Baele, 
Zurich, wlnterthur, Bhaffhaueen, St, Gallon, Lueern, crrar, Beninaona, Locarno, Lu- 
gano, Uendrislo. Qonoa. Turin, Milan, Florence, Rome, 

An A*t**ay oilier is tnnoxod to the Bank. Aesaye of gold, silver, quartz ores 
arid nilphursta Retunu In ooln or bare, e1 tl ptlonol the depositor. 

AdvnruTH made mi bullion and nn l>uni and bullion can '"■ forwarded from any 
|Hirt of the country, mid retunu made through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks, 
[September 18. 1 

n THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FBANCISCO. 

Capital 85,000,000. 

».0. MILLS President. | WM. ALVOKD. Yice-Frewt. 

lHOM.vs BROWN Cashier. 

Aoknth : 

New York. Apencv of the Bank of Oalforuia ; Boston, Trcmont Nationnl Bank ; 
Chicago. Union National Bank; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank; New Zealand, 
the Bank "f New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Corresi>oudcnt8 in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of tho world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburg]], Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
buurne, Sydn ey, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

THE NEVADA BANK, OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
Paid Op Capital $10,000,000. 

Louis M< La no President, j J. <J. Flood.. Vice-President. 

X. Ii. Mas ten Cashier. 

Directors :— J. C. Flood, J. W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, Jas. G. Fair, Louis McLane. 

Correspondents:— London— Smith, Payne & Smiths, Paris— Hottingu or & Co. 
Hamburg— Hesse, Newuian & Co. New York— " The Bank of New York, N. B. A." 
Chicago— Merchants' National Bank. Boston—Second National Bank. New Orleans 
— State Na-tional Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to receive deposits on open account, issue certificates of de- 
posit, buy and sell exchange, purchase bullion, and transact a general banking busi- 
ness. Collections made and proceeds remitted at current rates of exchange. Oct. '9. 

THE FISST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, 1). Callaghau ; Cashier, George W. Rodman ; Assistant 
Cashier, W. Ritchie. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, James C. Flood, Edward Martin, James Moftitt, N, Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : HesSe, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer& Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Elackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, China and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Dec. 13. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. — Capital paid up, 91,800,- 
000, with power to increase to -^10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
soine streets. Head Office — 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

Dec. 9. W. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 

Capital, $5,000,000, of which 83,000,000 is fully paid np aa 
present capital. San FranciHCO Office, 424 California ; London Office, 22 Old 
Broad street. President, M. S. LATHAM ; Manager, JAMES M. STREETEN ; Assist- 
ant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN. London Bankers, Bank of England and London 
Joint Stock Bank ; New York Bankers, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston Bankers, 
Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General 
Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said 
cities and all parts of the world. October 23. 

THE ANGL0-CAHF0RNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 
4 b)») California street, San Francisco.—- London Office. 3 

4fc/^>/^ Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co. , 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, ) „ 

Oct 4. _^ 1CN. STEINHART, f M ana g er3 - 

THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital, 85, OOO,O0O. — Alvinza Hay ward, President ; B. O. 
Sneath, Vice-President; H. F. Hastings, Cashier ; R. N. Van Brunt, Secretary. 
Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers on all principal Cities, Collections made and a 
general Banking business transacted. August 22. 

SUTRO & CO., 

Bankers and Brokers, 408 Montgomery street.— Highest 
price paid for U. S. Bonds, County Bonds, Scrip, Currency and Foreign Coin. 
Exchange drawn on New .York. „__ May 20 

MONEY TO LOAN. 

Jonn T. liittle, Money Broker and Real Estate Agent, dis- 
counts notes and loans money on all kinds of collaterals in large amounts ; buys 
and sells real estate. OFFICE : 405* CALIFORNIA "STREET, 

Dec. 25. Opposite Bank of California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 27, 1877. 



AFTER THE BROKERS. 
More than a year ago the Noes Letter yave the raining stock oper- 
ators about the must thorough ventilating they have ever received since 
they began the most unfair, unequal and dastardly game of gambling that 
the world has ever known. We cleared out some half dozen of the lanie 
ducks. We compelled others to go slower, and to deal their game with 
more discretion. We pointed out to what uses the diamond drill was^ be- 
ing put, and forged the truth, that has only become more apparent since 
then, that no man was safe in going to bed the owner of stock, unless he 
could know when he awoke in the morning what the diamond drill had 
been doing during the night. We showed with clearness unmistakable 
the manifold evils of the system of buying on margins, by which the 
broker uses his customer's capital and stock to his own great gain, but to 
the terrible loss and ruin of his too confiding client. The homilies which 
certain of the dailies are now so busily engaged in reading to their sub- 
scribers are but weak imitations of the weakest part of the good work we 
did so long ago. It will be remembered that passing from mere general- 
ities we went to the very root of the matter, and fortified our position by 
precise facts, exact dates, and distinctive names. There was no dodging 
the issue. The wrongs done were mentioned specifically, and they were 
sheeted right straight home to the wrong-doers. There was fear and trem- 
bling on California street. Thousands of the News Letter's issue were sold 
there before the Boards opened on Saturday mornings. Lawyers were 
employed to read our every line with a view to a "Wheeler injunction," a 
libel suit, or some of the many legal devices which in these latter times 
have been gotten up to protect those who are properly amenable to public 
censure. In open board it was declared that we should be prosecuted 
civilly and criminally. We reprinted our language and bid the blusterers 
come on, but they came not. They discovered that discretion was the 
better part of valor, as it undoubtedly was in their case. We continued 
our work until the subject was well nigh exhausted. As a consequence 
we have the proud consciousness of knowing that hundreds of the News 
Letter's patrons, who appreciated the force of its showing and the power 
of its logic, have escaped the dire calamities that have overtaken the less 
thoughtful crowd who have been beguiled by certain daily trumpets that 
have been blowing so vociferously in the interest of themselves and 
others. Just now would seem to be quite a good time to resume our 
labors in this portion of the vineyard. Since we left off the News Letter 
has acquired many hundreds cf new readers, who need to be posted as to 
what is going on in the inside. Moreover, the old ones may need a little 
strengthening in the faith which was first instilled into them by the 
teachings of this wise expositor of sound business principles. We don't 
boast of our orthodoxy in matters theological, but when it comes to ques- 
tions of solid silver, the mighty dollar, and the soundness of finances 
generally, and of our own in particular, it must be confessed that we are 
quite at home. Those who have known these columns for many years 
know that in this direction we preach excellently well, arid those who 
know us nearer home knnw that we practice what we preach. Precept 
is nothing if not followed by example. For ourselves, then, we buy not 
stocks, becaus? our money is better, more securely, and more usefully em- 
ployed in a legitimate business which we understand. If we should 
change our mind, when we have more money than we know what to do 
with, and make an investment in mining shares, we shall pay the whole 
cost of them, take them out of our broker's hands, and be content to sell 
them just so soon as we can make a profit on the investment adequate to 
the risk we run. Above all, we shall take care to own the diamond drill, 
or else be quite sure of our intimacy with the man who does. That is our 
advice in general with regard to stock buying. Just now the value of that 
advice may undoubtedly be well and usefully illustrated by numerous 
lessons taken from "the street." The truth is being told there at an al- 
together exceptionally rapid rate at present. More is to be learnt now in 
one day than can be found out during a whole month of inquiry at 
ordinary times. This loaning, borrowing and selling customers' stock is a 
field of roguery fertile in marvelous developments. We mean to prospect 
it for the benefit of all whom it may concern. He who fills his "shorts " 
with his customer's stock, and thus runs the risk of being unable to buy it 
back, is a fraud and a thief. When he avails himself of stock confided to 
his keeping and sells it to break the market, to the injury of his client, he 
is a fraud, and when he takes the risk of being unable to buy it back if 
it goes higher he is a thief. The naming of many such frauds and thieves 
would not at present be a difficult task. 

TT.T. - SOUNDING TICKS FROM THE TELEGRAPH. 

The secret ticks of the telegraph, are being read to us, and of a 
certainty they do not constitute pleasant reading. We are now being in- 
troduced to some of the doings of the party leaders just subsequent to the 
late Presidential election, and of a truth some of those doings had better 
have been left undone. That §8,000 draft sent to Oregon, and which, 
strange to say, was returned unused, may have been conceived in inno- 
cence, but it would have been a happier circumstance if Mr. Tilden's 
private secretary had nothing to do with it. The most astounding revela 
tions, however, are those made in regard to a high Cabinet officer, the re- 
doubtable Zach Chandler. That official was particularly anxious to count 
outTilden and to count in Hayes for the States of llorida, Louisiana 
and South Carolina, and his dispatches for that purpose to Governor 
Stearns of Florida have come to light. He opened his business in this 
wiBe : " We are certain of so many votes for Hayes that we must now 
have Louisiana, South Carolina and Florida by fair means or othej'wise," 
Then again he says : " Send a courier to each county and secure the re- 
turns. They must be made to show a majority for Hayes." To all of 
which the Governor agrees, " but says : "We cannot carry the State for 
Hayes unless we have troops and money immediately." The great 
Chandler is equal to the occasion and responds : " I have seen the Presi- 
dent and the Secretary of War, and was authorized by them to say troops 
and money will be furnished." As a matter of fact both troops and 
money were furnished and Hayes was counted in for Florida, although 
with all the " fixing" they received the returns on their face showed a ma- 
jority for Tilden. No dispassionate observer could have doubted at the 
time that this was the kind of work that was going on in the inside. The 
outward signs were sure evidence of the inward grace that was producing 
such astounding results. It is refreshing now to read of the coolness with 
which the infamy progressed. 

The sole agents for Krug Private Cuvee are Hellmann Brothers & 
Co., 525 Front street. 



THEATRICAL^ ETC. 
California Theater.—The advent of another great comedy light, and 
another week of crowded houses, gives further point to the axiom tint 
people go to the theater to laugh rather than weep, and that the cap and 
bells will draw pounds where the mask and daggers attract pence. The 
simple fact that Mr. Sothern has played " Lord Duudreary " nearly Wr- 
teen hundred times shows how little the critic has left to say on the sub- 
ject. There is hardly a theater-goer in the laud but who has Our Ameri- 
can Cousin by heart. The only wonderful thing about the matter now is 
that there is anything left of the original Sothern in private life. He 
manages to keep up a sort of identity, however, through his practical 
jokes. The hoary-headed old comedy appears about the same, excepting 
a few new "gags " and a more convenient, but less attractive, splitting of 
the third act* " My Lord " is as densely excruciatingly funny as ever, 
and presents the genius of idiocy with no diminution of the old success. 
Mr. Bishop gives a capital "Asa Trenchard," making as much of the part 
as any one we remember, save possibly Clarke. The scene with Miss 
Harrison, when he burns the will, was very perfectly done by both, and 
is the only bit of real, unforced pathos in the play. The rest, especially 
Miss Wilton, played the "airy nothings" of their roles most satisfactorily. 
Mr. Wilson's Abel Murcott " is a very strong, not to say slightly over- 
done, bit of acting. As usual, Mr. Sothern presents a new and hand- 
some face in his train. This time it is Miss Storrs, a young lady with an 
undeniably pretty face, albeit a most generous mouth, and who wisely 
permits her good looks alone to speak for her. This apparently immortal 
extravaganza has many traditions gathered from its long career. Our 
readers will remember that it was this play President Lincoln was laugh- 
ing over when he was killed. "Asa Irenchard" had just winked the 
shocked " Mountchessingtons " off the stage when rang the report of 
Booth's pistol, injecting the most real of tragedies into the most unreal of- 
comedies. We notice underlined A H&rncVs Nest, in which we can, and 
Daiy Garrkk, in which we cannot, praise Mr. Sothern. 

Grand Opera House.— The novelty this week has been the farce of A 
Bull in a China SJtop, in which Mr. Wheatleigh's " Bagshot" shows us 
what that actor can do when in earnest, and in which he richly earns his 
recalls. Kenilworth is kept on, to the satisfaction of everybody. The 
company have entered into the spirit of this cleverest of burlesques, and 
play it with a very telling heartiness and \im. Mr. Polk and Mr. Ken- 
nedy are very happy in their "gags," and funny generally. Bound the 
World in Eighty Days is the next attraction, and in which, we suppose, 
the San Francisco Bcene will be somewhat enlarged and localized. 

Fabbri Opera. — The very large house drawn by William Telllmst 
Sunday gave evidence of the hit made the previous week by Tlie Merry 
Wives of Windsor. The last given opera, however, was hardly so suc- 
cessful, and we express the general feeling when we ask the management 
to repeat the other capital performance next Sunday. Nothing finer or 
more genuinely satisfactory than the sustained duet between Formes and 
Muller has been heard here for a very long time. It quite deserves all its 
applause. By all means, let us have Merry Wives again. 

A lady, the wife of a well known citizen, who has been studying for 
the stage for the last two years, will shortly make her debut at the Cali- 
fornia Theater, under her maiden name of Kose Moss. The part she has 
chosen for her first appearance is the role of " Camille," to the study of 
which she has long and assiduously devoted her energies. Great expecta- 
tions are entertained with regard to the lady, as her ability is said to be 
undoubted. The evening fixed for her appearance is the 16th proximo. 

Died.— At Jesus Maria, Chihuahua, Mexico, on December 19th, of 
congestion of the brain, John Phillips Clemes, a native of England. 
[London papers please copy.] 

"When that libel trial is over next week, Judge Wheeler will learn 
the class of acts and the character of the man that he would restrain us 
from describing during all time to come. 

GEAND OPEEA HOUSE. 

Mission street, between Third and Fourth.— Fabbri Opera. 
Sunday January 2Sth, LAST FABBRI OPERA NIGHT— FREISCHUTZ ! 
Grand Opera, in four acts, by Carl Maria Von Weber. The Chorus will be strength- 
ened by the famous Singing Society— SCHWEIZER-BUND. " Ottocar, Prince of 
Bohemia," Jac. Mueller; "Caspar, First Huntsman," Carl Formes; "Max, Second 
Huntsman," Tiieo. HabEIOUNk; "Agatha," Inez Fabbri; "Anne," Louisa Beckmann; 
Supported by Messrs. Lefoxtaisb, HlRSCH, Forti, etc. Grand Incantation Scene in 
the third act, with Splendid Scenery and New Appointments. Conductor, Mr. 
RinoLi'ii Hbrold; Acting Manager, Mr. Chas. Fiutsch. Seats can be reserved on 
Friday and Saturday from 10 to 4 o'clock, at Messrs. Sherman & Hyde's Music Store, 
corner Kearny and Sutter streets, and on Sunday from 10 to 4 o'clock at the Grand 
Opera House. Jan. 27. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Mission street, between Third and Foarth.— Acting" Man- 
ager, Mr. Chas. Wheatleigh ; Scenic Artist, Mr. Win, Voegtlin. Immense 
success of Dion Bouccica nit's intensely amusing Comedy, A BULL IN A CHINA 
SHOP ! " Bagshot," MR. CHARLES \VlIEATL£lGH; and also of the popular and ac- 
complished BEAUCLERC SISTERS, in the Comic Extravaganza, KENILWORTH < 
Received with great enthusiasm by large and delighted audiences. Every evening at 
8 o'clock. Saturday, January 27th, grand Matinee at 2 p. m. In active preparation, 
with new and elaborate appointments, THE TOUR OF THE WORLD IN EIGHTY 
DAYS ! Bv Jules Verne. Sunday evening, January 28th, Fourth FABBRI Opera 
Night— FREISCHUTZ. Jan. 27. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Bush street, above Kearny.--- John McCulIongrh, Proprietor 
and Manager ; Barton Hill. Acting Manager. Brilliant reception to MR. 
SOTHERN, as LORD DUNDREARY. Everv evening until further notice, andatthe 
Saturday Matinee, OUR AMERICAN COUSIN. Iu rehearsal. H. J. Byron's new and 
uri-ina! 'farcical Comcdv (written cxpresslv for Mr. Sothern) entitled A HORNETS 
NEST IN THREE BUZZES AND A STINGER! After which will be produced— 
GARRICK, HOME, and DUNDREARY'S BROTHER SAM, in each of which MR. 
SOTHERN will appear in his original characters. Jan. 27. 

NEW BELLA UNION THEATER. 

Kearny street, between Washington ami Jackson. —Samuel 
Tetlow, Proprietor. CHARLEY REED, Ethiopian Comedian, Character Ar- 
tist and Stump Speech Orator. THE WYMANS, ALFRED and LULU, Specialty and 
Sketch Artists. CARRIE LEON and SAM SWAIN, the Celebrated Acrobatic Song 
and Dance Artists. SHED LeCLAIR, the Great Flying Trapeze Artist. MADGE 
AISTON, Song and Dance Artist. EDWARD GLOVER, the Celebrated Australian 
Comic Singer. The Gr^it Double Company in Comedy, Farce and Drama. Jan 27. 



Jul 1*7, 1877.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



HIS SATANIC MAJ. INVESTIGATES FOR HIMSELF, AND 
STALKS ABROAD THROUGH THE STREETS OF FRISCO. 

[//. & A/ f; :•■> r Hand ObnJri&wfen] 

What, hoi tu] ulaUd toribfalwl yon litti* thought) 1 men, 
To delightful ioen«| 

.■it I. it. it" what 1 nld "as true, 
: ]i..l for pantim 1*1*11 take, ai I often do «rhaa "blue*" 

So Ikl u.l. if ynu'll bfl m\ 

\** .! put run tin I- v and axplore it tax and « Ida, 

Nov quit v'ur fooling! left be "ff: tho' 1 dont want to Hurry— 

1 m \vf'. \ Depntj in charge, and well, I'm in ■ hurry. 

s.. those an your police coin! By thunder] who's that beanty? 

: ah, wall, when tkt ge>ta grimed and sooty] 
Like all my other rrabjecta, the change will be bo great 
That Mayor Bryant's ramored love will turn, I fear, t<» hate. 
And this Ea Clarke, the ambenler, ah ? who, smart enough En stealing, 
Unlike your genuine Yankee Bharp, lacked mnartDeai in oonoealing. 
me waa poor old Bennett's fault, f'-r, not being op to Bnuff, 
• had to collar Aim, :*t last, f>>r not collaring enough. 
\\ hv, fchia is i talifornia street? Wlmt rtiKhim;! What a nuise! 

these your brokers? Count me out; Cm not one of "the hoys;" 
They're knocked me endways. I am dry; and here's a place 1 know — 
[From hearing it oft mentioned by <>iir thirsty souls below)— 
The Pantheon; let's w in and Bee if Wainwright's tact 
Can mi\ a " Devil's Pick-me-up;" if n.it, we'll get him sucked. 
1 1 ughes S i '•>. have busted! I knew their nam- 1 full well; 
Their little game was " Puts and Calls "—a rotten, swindling sell! 
You'd put, Indeed, your money down, but, when yon came to "call," 
You'd End your shares had gone to "pot," and you had lost your all. 
Hold onl As I waa leaving home, my ferryman, old Charon, 
Overburdened with Ids treasure-trove he's nigh as rich as Sharon — 
Commissioned me for hell's sake to deposit in his name 
This thousand dollars in some bank— I suppose they're all the same?— 
No interest on deposits? Times must, indetd, be hard; 
Or, are their coffers uli too full? But, hold on steady, pardl 
The Bank of California— they always do what's fair — 
At least, they did when Ralston lived — I guess they're still all square. 
Yon gave me quite a turn, however, for such news, indeed, is sad — 
No wonder, as 1 told you, then, j'ou're all going to the bad. 
Oh, see that girl! how graceful! what bustling charms adorn her! 
Let's drink her health in British beer at " Bailey's," round the corner; 
Hi- place seems strangely tome-like, tho' why I cannot tell, 
'Cept that he's full of "broken Britishers," and so, you know, is Hell. 
How 'bout a game of faro? I've heard of Phil. McGovern — 
" No hogging— -just one game, and then wind up with Sothern; 
They're both :dike in one respect — they've each the happy art— * 
The one can make your packets light, the other one your heart* 
And so they have, by Jupiter! for oil Charon's coin is spent! 
Confiding boatman, it's all right, we'll only call it lent. 
To " Happy Jack's ? ' I'll go, my boy, tho' I heard they had to close 
For selling whisky on the sly to girls in scanty hose. 
Och! tear anages! who are these? Your hoodlums? Let us go; 
I've seen enough. You promised, too, your Chinatown to show. 
From bad to worse! Thin Chinatown? Blue blazes! what a stiukl 
My home's a perfect Paradise, compared with this. I think. 
What street is this? Dupont, you say? As sure as I'm alive 
I'll swear I saw a preacher's face in von low, filthy dive. 
Get out of this! It "caps the lot! This is your darkest curse, 
I doubt if I have got in Hell a place that's any worse. 
Well, just another "sulphur punch," and then I must " vamoose," 
Or else that jealous spouse of mine will think I'm on the loose. 
Next week we'll push this further, and, with "Marriotts Patent Flyer," 
Will take a trip thro' Cloudland regions, in each walk getting higher, 
Till we can gaze upon creation in one grand birdseye view, 
And report on our discoveries to the world at large. Adieu. 



FAILING FANCIES AS TO RUSSIA. 
The fancies aa to the great power of Russia are failing very fast of 
late. Long she has been regarded with almost superstitious dread by 
Western Europe, but now doubts begin to spread as to her ability to deal 
in a summary manner with Turkey alone. People used to repeat as a 
sort of half truism Napoleon's mot that "in fifty years Europe would be 
either Republican or Cossack." Nicholas hightened this feeling when he 
made Russia such a hard place to get into and get out of that people felt 
about it somewhat as children feel about the dark, as if it were a quarter 
out of which terrible things might come at any time. It is now becoming 
very apparent that Russia's recent expansions of territory have been car- 
ried on at a cost which at this moment threatens the State with bank- 
ruptcy, and is likely to make the process of transforming the serfs into 
peasants one of considerable danger, particularly if the expected struggle 
with Turkey should prove stubborn and protracted. The Revue des Deux 
Moiides brings out in a strong light the impediments to great exertions of 
any kind created by the smallueas of the accumulated wealth of the Em- 
pire, and the poverty of the great bulk of the population, and the conse- 
quent inelasticity of the taxes. The country has not the reserved nor the 
recuperative power of England, France or America, in which the savings 
are enormous, and in which the people have reached a high degree of in- 
dustrial activity and intelligence. The implements of war in these days 
have become terribly costly, and it is now more than ever it was that 
money is the god of battles. Moreover, the population of Russia is not 
homogeneous. It is made up of nobles, serfs and barbaric Asiatics. To 
keep these in subjection, to govern them with peace and security, and to 
endeavor to raise them in the scale of nations, is a work so gigantic as to 
give full employment for perhaps ages to come. There can be little doubt 
that the revelations which the world is receiving of this intestine weak- 
ness may powerfully affect European politics, by removing the British 
dread of aggression on the side of India. 

A new hotel is about to be erected on the corner of Stuart and Fol- 
soni streets, solely for the entertainment of the hoodlum to the manner 
born. The accommodations will be excellent, and in addition to many 
other attractions the caravansary will contain an office and two cells. 
The whole, when, completed, will be known as the " Tar Flat Branch 
Police Station." 



SIQNAL SERVI 
ENDING JA 

11 hi 


2E MKTKOROLOOICAI, R 
*f. S6. 1877. 3AN FRANOI. 


EPORT, WEEK 
JCO. CAL. 


AMI mul CoWMf Itne.'nn t< 


Frl. 10. 
80.11 


Sat. 20. 

... ig 


Sun SI. ! Mon.22 


Tu.-h 23 

3.1 .:i 
3U.1S 




Thr2B 


30.03 

29.85 | : .. 


.:•' '. 
30.10 






Maximum ami Minimum I'll' rmomeler. 




41 


11 


M | 58 1 60 
18 1 47 1 11) 


61 

to 


01 
60 


83 


CO { 


Mean Hail ft 11 nmitlitff. 
03 | Of. | 02 


70 I 


78 


S\V, 


NK. | 


Prevailing! Wind. 
NE, |N | 8E. | 


N. 1 


N.W 


388 


131 


Wind— Milis Traveled. 

123 | 107 | 122 ) 


71 | 


83 


Rainy. | 
.35 | 


Statu of Weather. 

F»lr. | Clomly. | Knir. | Kuir- | 
Rainfall In Twenty-four Mourn 

1 -OS 1 1 I 


Fair. | 

1 


Clear. 


Total Ra 


it J>urlnjj 


Season beatamtna* .TuTjr 1, JS76...5. 


ifi Encbttl 



SANITARY NOTES. 
One hundred and thirty five deaths occurred this week, as compared 

with 134 last, Seventy-eight males and 57 females. Forty-seven were 
under 5 years of age; IS between 5 and 20 years; 63 were between 20 and 
fit) years; and 7 over 150 years. Of the deaths from zymotic diseases, 14 
were small-pox, typhoid fever 8, diphtheria 21, scarlatina 2. Of diseases 
of the brain 3 were apoplexy, 2 brain disease, and 2 paralysis. Ten per- 
sons died of consumption, 10 of pneumonia, 4 of bronchitis, and 4 of 
crou|w. There was one death from heart disease, 1 hoanoptysis, 1 liver 
disease, 2 hepatitis, 1 dropsy, and 2 Bright's disease. There were three 
casualties and two suicides. Small-pox appears to> be again on the in- 
crease, 64 fresh cases having been reported in the week. Diphtheria con- 
tinues to be fatal to the young, and a considerable number of adults are 
suffering under mild attacks. It is an error to suppose diphtheria 
is necessarily fatal. Like all other complaints, its- severity is 
of various degrees, and is determined by a variety of causes, such 
as the health of the person affected, and the sanitary conditions under 
which he lives. No sore throat should be thought of lightly, and many a 
child has been the subject of diphtheritic poisoning who has escaped tho 
diphtheritic deposit, in consequence of judicious care and treatment. We 
would therefore urge upon all parents to seek medical advice for their 
children in all cases of sore throat, however mild, remembering that the 
atmosphere is charged with diphtheritic poison which, once installed, is 
by no means easily dislodged even by the very beBt treatment. It is futile 
to speak of the sanitary defects under which the city groans. The foul 
dust was temporarily laid by the rain, but is now as rife as ever. It would 
be interesting to know how much sewer deposit has been swept away by 
the rain. We are inclined to think less than the mud which has been put 
into the gully holes by the street-sweepers. In the early part of the week 
we observed a large force of men on Montgomery street thus engaged in 
sweeping the streets and choking up the sewers with the sweepings. In 
most European cities this would constitute an indictable offense, but on 
Montgomery street the sewers are so level that a little more or less deposit 
is probably of no consequence. 

PARACRAPHIANA. 

Pro Bono Publico. 

All the old boys and a host of the youngsters have been accustomed 
to fill their demijohns and buy their claret and champagnes at Oilman's. 
His judgment in the selection of the finest brands of each has been long 
unquestioned. We rejoice to see that our old friend has taken a new 
start, and with a freshly replenished stock, in serving his customers, as of 
old, at 308 California street. Give him a call. 



The Americus Club will give a grand ball at Union Hall on the 5th 
of next month, when the aristocratic sum of $5 will be charged for tick- 
ets. The " Americus," like its namesake in New York, is the leading 
Democratic club in this city, and its balls are simply reunions of the man- 
aging elements of the party. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank, Xo. 6 Post Street, 
MasoDM Temple, San Francisco. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of 
this Bank, held January 18th, 1877, a Dividend was declared at the rate of Nine (9) 
per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and Seveu and One-Half (7A) per cent, per an- 
num on Ordinary Deposits, for the Semi-Annual Term ending January 21et, 1877, 
payable on and after January 25th, 1877, free of Federal Taxes. 
Jan. 27. H. T. G RAVES, Secretary. 



0BEG0N STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Regular Steamers to Portland, leaving: San Francisco 
weekly Steamers GEORGE W. ELDER, J. L. STEPHENS, ORIFLAM.ME, 
and AJAX, connecting with steamers to SITKA and PUGET SOUND, and O. andC. 
R. R. Co. and Oregon C. R. R. Co, through Willamette, Umpqua, and Rogue River 
Valleys, Oregon. Tickets to all points on tho O. and C R. R. sold at reduced rates". 

K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent, 
June 14. 210 Battery street. 

FOR PORTLAND, OREGON. 
he Only IHrect Line— Steamship Ajax, Mackie, Com- 
mander, leaves Folsom-strect wharf, SATURDAY, Jan. 27th, at 10 A.M. 
January 27 K. VON OTERENDORP, Agent, 210 Battery street. 



T 



THOMAS DAY, 

Importer of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Gilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Jan. 27. 

JOHN BUTLER, 
calcr in Wines and Liquors, Engrlish Ales and Porter, 7 

Sutter Street and 506 Market Street, San Francisco. Jan. 27. 



D 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. £27, 187?, 



COLUMN FOR THE CURIOUS, 

In Nature, Science, and Art> 

An extraordinary report appeared some time ago in the papers, of 
an explosion and sudden disappearance of an unknown vessel off Portland. 
A still more extraordinary explanation of the matter is given by a corre- 
spondent of the Dorset County Chronicle, who states that when on the look- 
out at Portland Bill on the morning when the alleged explosion occurred, 
he saw what at first appeared a long, low, dismasted ship, with short, 
stumpy jury-masts, about one mile S.S.W. off Portland. IShe looked 
like a vessel broken-backed, as her stem and stern were well out of water, 
anil something like smoke or steam was rising up in midships. To his 
surprise, on looking through a telescope, he saw it was a " monster 6sh, 
with head and tail rising high above the swell of the sea, and the back 
nearly down to the level of the water, and what appeared at first to be 
smoke or steam was large jets of water, thrown up like a big whale blow- 
ing. The stumpy masts were immense long fins. All at once, with a 
tremendous bound at least thirty or forty feet high, and down again al- 
most like lightning, the huge monster disappeared." This statement, it 
is said, is confirmed by Captain Cosens, Gibbs and Mace, who went out in 
the Commodore in search of the crew and fragments of the supposed vessel. 
They saw "an immense monster of the deep* 1 throwing up jets of water 
and making itself painfully conspicuous by its eccentric proceedings. 
This remarkable creature is evidently not the sea serpent, but something 
far more interesting and disagreeable. Indeed, it is impossible not to feel 
sorry for the sea serpent, whose charms are entirely eclipsed by the Port- 
land monster. 

Philadelphia Longevity.— The Philadelphia Ledger says; The total 
number of the deaths of octogenarians announced in the Ledger during 
1876 was 699, there being 226 men and 433 women, the latter being more 
than three-fifths of the whole number. The total for 1876 is 24 greater 
than for 1875, and all the statistics show that the women living over 80 
years not only outnumbered the men, but they also were the longest lived, 
there being many more women than men who lived beyond 90. Of the 
men who died at or beyond the age of 80, the following numbers reached 
the various ages designated: 90 years, eleven ; 91, two ; 92, three ; 93, five; 
94, two; 95, two ; 96, four ; 97, one ; 98, one ; 99, one ; 100, one ; 104, 
one ; 107, one ; 110, one. Of the women who died at or beyond the age 
of 80, the following numbers reached the various ages designated: 90 
years, twenty -four ; 91, thirteen ; 92, six ; 93, five ; 94, ten ; 95, six ; 96, 
six ; 97, seven; 98, four ; 99, two ; 100, five. 

Consul Stevens, in his report on the trade of Nicolaieff during the 
past year, states that that part of South Russia continued free from cattle 
plague. But his attention was drawn in the summer to several cases of 
sudden baldness of oxen and cows, and the loss of tails and manes among 
horses. He recollected that a former servant of his, prematurely bald, 
had got the habit, when trimming the lamps, of wiping his petroleum-be- 
smeared hands in the scanty locks that remained to him, and the result 
was a much finer head of black, glossy hair than he ever had before. At 
the Consul's suggestion, the owner of several black cattle and horses af- 
fected as above mentioned, tried the remedy, and found that it effected a 
quick and radical cure. The Consul observes that the petroleum should 
be of the most refined American qualities, and be rubbed in vigorously 
and quickly with the palm of the hand at intervals of three days, six or 
seven times in all. 

A ' ' rummy " (in a double sense) temperance anecdote, used by an 
ex-chaplain of the Duke of Buckingham in illustration of the evils of 
drink, really deserves immortalizing (says a contemporary) even though it 
was too rich to be true. The reverend gentleman stated at a recent Med- 
ical Conference that within one hundred yards of the Sailors' Home at 
Liverpool there were forty-seven public houses, and the publicans actu- 
ally strewed sawdust in front of them, and sprinkled rum over it, so that 
tlic smell of the spirit might decoy sailors within their doors. This beats 
even the proverbial pinch of salt on the bird's tail. The Rev. E. J. Gar- 
diner has had to "knuckle down;" the secretary to the Liverpcol Li- 
cense Victualers' Association having, in a letter to a gentleman at Ban- 
bury, indignantly denied that there is a particle of truth in the story. 
But having received the hint, who can guarantee that the experiment will 
not be tried. 

The ' ' Burger Zeitung," of Berlin, makes a great to-do over a tele- 
graphic feat lately accomplished in that inodorous capital. On the occa- 
sion of the delivery of Prince von Bismarck's speech on the Eastern Ques- 
tion, it says w'.th pride, 38,980 words were transmtited in one night from 
the bureiu in the Franzosische Strasse. This, no doubt, was a great 
achievement ; but British telegraphists exceed it in the ordinary routine 
of business, and leave it simply nowhere sometimes. One night during 
the last Session, when the Bravo case and a great debate in the House 
happened together, half a million of words were sent ; and, over and 
above that, twenty special wires at work trilled onwards to the extremi- 
ties of the provinces an average of 20, IKK) words each. 

A machine has been invented in England for utihzing the rolls of a 
Bhip, caused by the ocean swell, as a means of propelling the vessel. By 
the rise and fall, air is compressed into cylinders, which can be used as 
reservoirs of power. The inventor thinks that an average Atlantic wave 
will give as much impulse as a 200-horse power engine. 

It appears that some inventor has found out the means of sending 
portraits by telegraph. The modus operandi has not yet been disclosed, 
but experiments have been made, and — if we are to believe the papers — 
with complete success. The trial was made by the police authorities of 
Paris and Lyons. 

A French chemist makes the remarkable announcement that the 
mere presence of an iron bar in a box of grain, biscuit and the like, will 
prevent both decay and attacks of insects. It's not an expensive experi- 
ment. Any farmer can find a broken plow-share or log-chain to put in 
the grain-bin. 

A notice in the Ostsee Zeitung accounts for the frequent deficiencies in 
the aroma of foreign cigars by announcing that from Guben whole wagon- 
loads of dried cherry leaves are weekly exported for the manufacture of 
"tobacco," 

Dr. Zeller, of Germany, finds caustic ammonia, internally applied, a 
pure cure fur rheumatism. 



INSURANCE. 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 
HUTCHINSON, MANN & SMITH. 

NO 314 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

AGENTS FOR THE 

Franklin Ins. Co Indianapolis, Ind New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas St. Paul F. & M. Ins. Co... St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio Atlas Ins. Co Hartford Conn. 

People's Infl. Co Newark, N. J. Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

National L. I. Co., U. S. A..Wash"n, D. C. JGirard Ins. Co- Philadelphia, Pa. 

Capital Represented, Twelve Iff ilions. 
POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY aT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON, MANN A SttlTIF. General Agents, 
Dec. 5. 314 California street, San Francisco. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CAIIFORNIA. 
~VTo. 406 Calilornia street, next door to Bank of California. 

Xl Fire Insurance Company. Capital, §300,000. Officers : — J. F. Houghton, 
President ; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President ; Charles R. Story, Secretary. H. H. 
BIGELOW, General Manager. 

D l recto aa.— San Francisco— Geo. H. Howard, F. D. Atherton, H. F. Teschemacher, 
A. B. Grogan, John H. Reilington, A. W. Bowman, C. S. Hobbs, B. M. Hart.shorne, 
D. Conrad, Wm. H. Moor, George S. Johnson, H. N. Tilden, W. M. Greenwood. S. L. 
Jones, George S. Mann, Cyrus Wilson, W. H. Foster, Jr., Joseph Galloway, W, T. 
Garratt, C. Waterhuuse, A. P. Hotaling. Oregon Branch— P. Wasserman, B. Gold- 
smith, L. F, Grover, D. Macleay, C. H. Lewis, Lloyd Brooke, J. A. Crawford, D. M* 
French, J. Lowenberg. Hamilton Boyd, Manager, W. L. Ladd, Treasurer. Marys- 
ville — D. E. Knight. San Diego — A. H. Wilcox. Sacramento Branch — Charles 
Crocker, A. Redington, Mark Hopkins, James Carolan, J. F. Houghton, D. W. Earl, 
Isaac Lohman, Julius Wetzlar ; Julius Wetzlar, Manager ; I. Lohman, Secretarv. 
Stockton Branch— H. H. Hewlett, George S. Evans, J. D. Peters, N. M. Orr, W. F. 
MeKee, A. W. Simpson, A. T. Hudson, H. M. Fanning ; H. H. Hewlett, Manager ; N. 
M. Orr, Secretary. San Jose Branch— T. Ellard Beans, Josiah Belden, A. Pfister, J. 
S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, N. Hayes, Noah Palmer, B. D. Murphy, J. J. Denny, Man- 
ager ; A. E. Moody, Secretary. Grass Valley — William Watt, Robert Watt. Ns- 
vada — T. W. S igourney. Feb. 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.— UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds.— Established in 1861.— Nos. 416 and 
■118 California street. Cash capital ¥750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco— J. Mora Moss, James Otis, Mosses Heller, N. J. T. Dana, II. J. 
O'Connor, W. W. Montague, Daniel Meyer, Adam Grant, Antoine Borel, Charles 
Kohler, Joseph Seller, W. C Ralston, I. Lawrance Pool, A. Weill, N. G. Kittle, Jabez 
Howes, Nicholas Luning, John Parrott, Milton S. Latham, J. Bauin, M. D. Sweeney, 
Joseph Brandenstein , Gustave Touchard, G. Brignardello, George C. Hiekox, T. Lem- 
men Meyer, J. H. Baird, T. E. Lindenberger. Sacramento— Ed w. Cadwalader, J. F. 
Houghton, L. A. Booth. Marvsville — L. Cunnigham, Peter Decker. Portland, O. — 
Henry Failing. New York — J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, James Phelan. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. Oct. 26. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FIKE AND MARINE. 

Clash Assets, Jan. 1st, 1876, $478,000.— Principal Office, 
J 21S and 220 Sansome street, San Francisco. Officers :— Peter Donahue, Pres- 
sident; A. J. Bryant, Vice-President ; Charles H. Cusiung, Secretary ; H. H. Wat- 
son, Marine Surveyor. Board ok Directors : — Peter Donahue, Jame's Irvine, C. D. 
O'Sullivan, A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailev, E. W. Corbert, 
George 0. McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. 
Buckley, P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld. 
P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, O. W. Childs, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma Comity. H. W. Scale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of I*ife Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Foi'Rtees Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
April 23.] 313 Montgomery street, Nevada Block. 

HAMBURG-MAGDEBURG FIRE INSURANCE CO., OF HAMBURG. 

This Company is now prepared to issue policies against 
Loss or Damage by Fire at current rates. Every risk taken by this Company 
is participated in by three of the largest German Fire Insurance Companies, repre- 
senting an aggregate capital and surplus of over SIXTY-FOUR MILLION MARK, 
equal to SIXTEEN MILLION DOLLARS, U. S. GOLD, thus enabling this Company 
to accept large Unes. GUTTE & FRANK, General Agents, 
Sept. 23. 321 Battery street. 

BERLIN-COLOGNE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF BERLIN, 
GERMANY. 

Capital, 6,000,000 Reich-Marks, 81,500,000 \ . S . Gold Coin. 
Having been appointed General Agents for the Pacific Coast, we are now pre- 
pared to write Policies at the usual rates. TIDEMAN, HIRSCHFELD & CO., 
Nov. 4. Office: No. 302 Sansome street, under W. F. & Co.'s Bank. 

ESTABLISHED 1821. 

Capital, Gold $10,000,000. 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., OF LONDON. 

Dec. 16. Agen ts : BALFOUR, GUT HRI E & CO., 2 3Q California st. 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN 

Subscribed Capital, 915,000,000 ; Accumulated Funds, up- 
wards of 56,750,000 ; Annual Fire Premiums, less re-insurance, ^l,8S0,O0O. 
Losses promptly paid in United States Gold Coin. W. L. BOOKER, Agent, 

April 13. No. 319 California street, San Francisco. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., OF TORONTO, CANADA. 

(lash Assets, 81, 207, 483.™ London Assurance Corporation, 
J of London, England. Cash Assets, $14,993,466. — Issue Policies of Insurance 
against loss by fire, at equitable rates. CROSS & CO., General Agents, 

Jan. 20. 316 California street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 



C 



apital 85,000,000.— Agents: Balfour, Gutbrie A Co., No. 

230 California street, San Francisco. No. 18. 



E. L. Craig. J. Craig. 

CRAIG, EDWARDS & CRAIG, 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law. Land Suits and Patent Right 
Cases a Specialty. No. 240 Montgomery street, San Francisco California. 
[July 29.] 



E. D. Edwards. 



.Ian. 87, 1877.1 



CALIFORNIA ADVEUTISEH. 



BLACK MAIL A MEDLEY. 
Ami tiiiwn Uaraobeiai Obobds. 

" In a rtonit tbofttrioal action th« manager* of the prinoipal Loudon 
theateri iwore positively that they Dover dealt throagfa agents. The 
wonder must be now bow these gentry live and thrive. They also swore 
that they know ""thing whatever <-i the blaekmailui 
Of theaters m an the heads, Oommission we've heard of, and then 

i benignant, ndol hi r thing 

ch manaanr enede, Likewise ot douceurs to 

Juij now be*! ->■ j'llv indignant. Fori well interceded. 

13ut on our unitedest word 

By :ili we regard as unfailing 
Our hearts are lull bom to have heard 



It makt i as feel awfully staid, 

Our fine sense of honor prevailing, 
To think the i rufesaion*a betrayed 



By wretch 



tne i rutei 
eswno re> 



reek of blackmailing. < ( i such ;i diagraoe as blackmailing. 



Tol Lol 
Blaokrnailing^ a terrible w.n-.l. 

It causes .1 singular Feeling, 
And cannol hai mrred 

In propel theatrica] dealing. 
To think -i stage-manager^a Bin 

Should lead to professional wailing! 
We'd rather pay treble the tin ing, 

Than hear nucha word aa black- Deductions to make up the rent.— 
mailing. Tun honor, but never blackmailing 

Tol lol! Tol lol! 



Tbl toll 

1 use agents at all 
N'i men of position would do BO : 

nnot touch what IS small. 
Anil that's lui\v the a-riK'ics ^rtw sk. 

We've all hear*! of Bixty per cent., 
And extras scarce worth the retail- 



NOTICE TO MARINERS. 



United States of America. Pacific Coast. — Change in Position of 

Light at Point Bonita Ligrht Station, Entrance to San 

Francisco Bay, California. 

Notice is hereby given, that on and after the 1st day of February, 
1877, a light will be shown from the light-house recently erected at the ex- 
tremity <>f Point Bonita, California, in place of the one which, for many 
years, had been exhibited abouf j ot a mile inland. 

The fight will be fixed, white. The illuminating' apparatus is dioptric, 
of the second order, lighting 5-6th degrees of the horizon. 

The focal plane is 21 feet above the ground, and 140 feet above mean 
low water. 

The light should be seen in clear weather from the deck of a vessel 15 
feet above the sea, 1^ nautical miles. 

The structure is a tower with two wings, and painted white. It is 363 
feet in a southwesterly direction from the steam fog-syren, is built of 
brick, the low tower rising through the center, and having an oil-room on 
one side and a sleeping room on the other side. The old tower is painted 
white, and will be preserved as a day-beacon. The dwelling and out- 
buildings are near the old tower, and are painted white. 

The approximate position of the light-house, as furnished by the Coast 
Survey. ifi as follows : Latitude— 37 dee., 48 min., 48.1 seconds north ; 
Longitude— 122 deg., 31 min., 47.3 seconds west. Magnetic variation in 
February, 1877, 10 deg. 35 min. east. 

Magnetic bearings and distances of prominent lights and objects are as 
follows : Point Reyes Lighthouse, W. £ N., 25 J nautical miles ; South 
Farallones Lighthouse, S.W. by \V\, 23J nautical miles; Fort Point 
Lighthouse, E. & N., 24 nautical miles ; Alcatraz Lighthouse, N.E. by E. 
I }■]., 5j nautical miles ; Seal Rock, off Point Lobos, S.E. by S. A S., 21-5 
nautical miles ; Point San Pedro, S. by E. § E., 13£ nautical miles. 

By order of the Lighthouse Board. 

(Signed) Joseph Henry, Chairman. 

A Discovered Naturalist.— Mr. Thomas Edward, of Banff, an ob- 
scure, hard-working naturalist, has been selected for the honor of a pen- 
sion of S50 per annum by the C^ueen, and has received the intimation of 
the royal intention by a letter, of which the following is a copy: "2 
Whitehall Gardens, Christmas Day, 1870 — Sir: The Queen has been much 
interested in reading your biography by Mr. Smiles, and is touched by 
your successful pursuit of natural science under all the cares and troubles 
of daily toil. Her Majesty has been graciously pleased to confer on you 
a pension of S50 a year. — I am, etc., yours faithfully, Beaconstield. — Mr. 
Thomas Edward, Banff." 



The grasshopper States, Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, Min- 
nesota, and Dakota Territory, through their governors appeal to Congress 
to attach an entomological commission to the territorial survey, to investi- 
gate the locusts, and devise a means of preventing their ravages ; also to 
authorize the signal service to observe and announce the movements of 
these insects. The grasshopper rises nearly to the dignity of a national 
issue, but where shall we stop if we are going into bug politics ? The de- 
partment of agriculture seems to be the proper bureau to put work on it. 

More Propositions for the Conference.— The great success of the 
highly original proposition that the Belgians should occupy Bulgaria lias 
elicited the following whimsicalities from certain of the plenipotentiaries. 
That the Germans shall occupy Leicester-square under Manteuffel. That 
India shall be occupied by the Fenians. That Alsace and Loraine shall 
be occupied by the Danes. That Gibralter shall be occupied by Mr. 
John Bright. That the new and palatial building erected at 153 Fleet- 
street, after designs by the most eminent architects, shall be occupied by 
Mr. Fun, during the redecoration of Buckingham Palace. — Fun. 

A 'cute young wife says: "When I want a nice snug day all to my- 
self I tell George dear mother is coming, and then I see nothing of him 
until one in the morning." 



An Elgin (I1L ), newspaper has this advertisement: "Found— A 
buckskin mitten. If the owner will leave the other at this office he will 
greatly oblige the finder." 

In view of the fall races ladies should remember that Miss Patter- 
son first met Jerome Bonaparte at a horse race. 

With a nose 



The Servian army has a Noseveloff as commander, 
well off there is no need of blowing. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 

Odd Follows' Saving* Bank.— The Board of DJreeton or 

wj) per un on Ponnan oi 1 1 | 

(7 3*10) par oent, per annum on Short Dei innua] terra end 

cetnbersist, 1876, payable on Mid after the S2d Instant. 

3m i ■■■ [Jui i.i | .i UtfEfi I 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan society. «i» Clay street.— A* a meetlngof 
1 i Idend wu doctored tor the term ending December 
■ 'i per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free ol 
Fed i i rax, and payable on ana after January I ■ 
■'•'" 16. CYRUS W. CARM vnv, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICF. 

The German Havlngro and Loan Society*-- For the half year 
ending December SI, 187fl, the Board of Directors of the German J 
Loan Society has declared the Dividend on Terra Deposits at the ratool uine (Jb) per 
cent per annum, mid Ordinary Deposits at the rate of Beven and oni hall 
(per cent, per annum, tree from Federal Taxes, ami payable <>ii and after the 
15th «l;u ><f January, 1*77. By order, [Dec. :so.i GEO. LETTE, Secretary. 



D 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French Mutual Provident Savings and Loan Society..— A 
Dividend of nine (9) per eont. per annum, tree of Federal Taxes, tor the six 
months ending Decembor 81, 1876, was declared at the Annual Bleating held un Jan- 
uary i:., US77, payable on and after January 17, 1877. Bv order. 
Jan. -li). GUSTAVE MAIIE. Director. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings I'ulon. 532 California street, corner 
Webb, —For the half year ending with December 81, 1876, a Dividend lias been 
declared, at the rate of nine (!i) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and seven and 
one-half (7.J) per cent, on Ordinary Deposits, free of Federal Tax, payable on and af- 
ter January L5, 1877. [Jan. 0.] LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Farmers* mid Mechanics' Bank of Savings have de- 
clared a dividend for the half year ending December 31st, 1870, at the rate of 
nine percent, per annum on term, seven per cent, perannum on class one (1) ordinary, 
and five per cent, per annum on class two (2) ordinary deposit, payable on and after 
January 16th, L877. By order. (Jan. 6. J G. M. (JONDEE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Dividend \i». 5.— Collateral Loan and Savings Bank, cor- 
ner Post and Kearny streets. — An extra dividend of 5 per cent., for the six 
months ending December 31st, has been declared payable January 5th, to stock- 
holders of record December 27th. [Jan. 0.J " F. S. CARTER, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
ivldend No. 4. ---Collateral Loau and Savings Bank, cor* 

, r ner Post and Kearny streets.— The Regular Monthly Dividend of 2 per cent., 

for December, is declared, payable January 5th, to stockholders of record Dec. 27th. 

Jan. 0. F. S. CARTER, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Dime Bank.— For the half year ending- December 31st, a 
dividend as follows has been declared, viz. : on Term Deposits, 12 per cent. ; 
on Ordinary Deposits, 6' per cent.— payable immediately. 

Jan. 0. ' W. McMAHON O'BRIEN, Secretary and Cashier. 

8. F. & N. P. B. B. 

(Change of Time. — On and after Monday. January 1st, 
J the steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE, Captain W. Warner, will leave Green- 
street wharf, daily (Sundays included), at 3 p.m., connecting at Donahue with cars 
for Cloverdale and intermediate stations. Connection made at Fulton with the 
Fulton and Guernville Branch to Korbel's Mills and the Great Redwood Forests. 
The train leaves Cloverdale daily (Sundays included), at G a.m., connecting with 
steamer at Donahue for San Francisco. Close connections made with stages for So- 
noma, the Geysers, Ukiah, Clear Lake, Mendocino, Mark West, Skaggs' and Littons* 
Springs. Freight received on wharf from 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. SUNDAY Trips — L'ntil 
further notice, the steamer will leave Green-street Wharf every Sunday at 3 p.m. for 
Cloverdale and way stations. General Office, 420 Montgomery street. 

A. A. BEAN, Superintendent. P. DONAHUE, President. 

Jan. 13. P. E. DOUGHERTY, Gen'l Pas. & Ticket Agent 

FOE SALE. 
£N p*A\ 6\i\A\ First Mortgage Bonds of the Nevada County 
wOx '•' "vr" " Narrow Gauge Railroad, running between Colfax, Grass 
Valley, and Nevada City. These bonds run 20 years, from January 1, 1670, bearing 
interest at the rate of a per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually at the bank of 
Wells, Fargo & Co., in this city. No more desirable investment can be offered. Will 
be sold in lots to suit. [Sept. 9.] ANDREW BAIRD, No. 301 California street. 

c. main.] MAIN & WINCHESTER, [b. ij. wincuesteb. 

Manufacturers and Importers of Harness, Saddles, Bri- 
dles, Whips, Collars, Saddlery Ware, etc., Nos. 214 and 216 Battery street, San 
Fnincisco. N. B. — A good assortment of Concord Stage Harness constantly on hand. 
[September 12.] 

EPPINGEB'S SALOON. 

Louis Epplnger, formerly of Ualleck street, has removed 
to Nevada Block (entrance on Summer street). Will be happy to see all hie 
riends. MILWAUKEE BEER a Specialty. Sept 30. 



[ J. Lee. D. W. Folqer 



B. F. Flint. Flint, Bixbt & Co.] 

A. P. FLINT & CO., 

Graders, Packers and Dealers in Wool, corner of Battery 
and Greenwich streets, San Francisco. Jan. 29. 

CAREW LEDGER PAPERS 

Have uo equal for making Blank Books. John G. Hodge 
& Co., Importers and Manufacturing Stationers, 327, 329, 331 Sansomestreet 
Agents for the Pacific Coast. Nov. 4. 

HIGHEST AWARD AND MEDAL 
eceived by B-uryeas' Celebrated Starch. Henry C. Egerton, 

Agent, No. 109 California street. Nov. 18. 

P. H. CANAVAN, 
Real Estate, 521 Montgomery Street. S. F- 



R 



|f Jan. i. 



OFFICES OF THE AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO., 

No. 607 to 615 Merchant street. San Francisco" 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER 



AND 



Jan. 27, 1877. 



A HIGH COURT OF APPEALS ON WHEELER'S IN- 
JUNCTION 
We were lawyers enough to declare from the word go, that a 
Wheeler injunction was as destitute of legality as of common sense. It 
turns out to be so. We call special attention to that decision in another 
column. An injunction to restrain the publication of a future libel is torn 
into legal tatters, then laughed at, and finally scorned by one of the 
highest courts of appeal in the United States. It will surely make horri- 
bly suggestive reading to the author of that illegal monstrosity now 
known as "A Wh* e'er Injun ct on," the fatal lack of common sense of 
which we have shown with a force and pungency that have made our 
illustrations stick fast in every reader's memory. The redurtfa ad ab- 
surdum we have ere now made so complete that there is no getting rid of 
it. Every person who now thinks of Judge Wheeler, inevitably connects 
him with the absurdity that if he and his injunction had been in existence 
at the time, the little story of Judas Iscariot had possibly not found its 
w».' in o the gospels. That illustration \\*i so apt, so appropos, and it so 
amusingly illumined the exact point involved, that it at once took hold of 
the public fancy and passed from mouth to mouth as one of the hits of the 
day. It was seen that, though a man might be a saint to-day, it was 
clearly possible for him to become a sinner to-morrow, and hence the in- 
conceivable mistake of shielding him from censure for all time to come. 
Fancy the infallibility of a man being guaranteed during his whole future 
life ! With a Wheeler injunction in his hand, even if he is altogether 
lovely to-day, yet to-morrow he may be hatching treason, contriving the 
assassination of the President, and the overthrow of the Republic, but we 
dare not so much as hint at the truth. A Wheeler injunction is equal to 
that divine right of kings which entitles them to be considered in- 
capable of wrong. It does for the fellow what the decree of the Ecumeni- 
cal Council does for Pio Nono — it declares him infallible. It, in fact, 
tends to uphold the base thought that the poet meant to render obnoxious 
when he said, "Whatever is, is right." Certainly no writer dare set it 
down as wrong if a Wheeler injunction stared him in the face. Thus, in 
considering Judge Wheeler's decision, we reach the very ultima thithe of 
absurdity. Its illegality is conclusively shown by that judgment in 
another column. The case appealed is not our own, but it is identical 
with ours, only that the court below refused the injunction, and it was 
the plaintiff who had to appeal. It would almost seem as if that court of 
final jurisdiction had had Wheeler's decision before it, for it takes hold of 
his argument, cuts it to pieces, and makes mincemeat of it. A sensitive 
Judge, affected by it, would begin to doubt his fitness for his office, and 
would give the doubt the benefit by resigning. Last week we showed 
how our own Supreme Court instantly, and with an almost apparent con- 
tempt, dealt with a flagrant error of his. Now comes another unanimous 
and contemptuous reversal of his law by an appellate court. Surely when 
he reads tbat, the doubt will grow into certainty, and receive the benefit 
accordingly, by his stepping down and out. whence he came, thither 
may he return. His almost clientless chambers of two or three years ago 
await his return, ready to remain almost clientless stilL 



SHUFFLTNG THE POLITICAL CARDS AGAIN. 

It is an old trick with the gambler, when he sees that his hand is 
weak, to complain of some irregularity, with a view to a new deal, and in 
hope that, as he cannot do worse, he may do better next time. This is 
just about what is taking place in regard to the great political game that 
is now being played at Washington. That Tilden carried Louisiana and 
Florida there is no manner of doubt. That the House, if wisely led, 
would be master of the situation, is equally clear. Matt Carpenter, the 
ex-Republican Senator, is, as everybody knows, man possessed of con- 
siderably more than average ability. The other day a friend asked him 
what he thought of the political outlook. "If I was a Democratic mem- 
ber of Congress," said he, "I could answer far more satisfactorily." 
"Why so?" replied his interlocutor. "Because," rejoined Carpenter, 
" the House of Representatives has the whole thing in its own hands. If 
the Democrats have the brains and the backbone to manage their case as it 
ought to be managed, they must win. If not, they will lose." That was 
without doubt a pretty exact summing up of the situation. The Repub- 
licans in Congress felt just about like that. Their game was up unless 
they got a new deal, and they have got it. A commission is now to deter- 
mine a matter about which there ought not to have been any honest 
doubt. Five Republican and five Democratic members are to form part 
of the commission, which is to be completed by the addition of five 
Judges. Four of these are to be the senior Judges, who are equally 
divided in politics, and they are to choose the fifth, so that in all human 
probability the fifth wheel to the coach will be its real propelling power, 
and we shall be presented with the extraordinary exhibition of the Presi- 
dency of this great nation being determined by the chance involved in the 
selection of that fifth wheel. This is all bad, but bad as it is, it is better 
than the threatened anarchy with which Grant, Chandler & Co. would 
seek to inaugurate Hayes, and even better than the House, with right but 
not might, standing by Tilden. The nation will survive whoever is Presi- 
dent this time. But it will not always survive if subsequent elections are 
to be determined in this way. The politicians will get more intemperate 
every time, and resort to worse and worse means. The evil is now known. 
Some fundamental constitutional amendment should be passed to guard 
against it in the future. 

THE FUGITIVE PRESIDENT. 

Mexican affairs present a curious phase at this moment. Lerdo, the 
President de facto, has fled the country on a merchant vessel for Panama 
from a little harbor in the State of Guerero, and the gentleman who as- 
sumed the Presidency, Senor Don Jose Maria Yglesias, the ex-Chief 
Justice and Vice-President of the country, has had also to flee before the 
conquering hordes of the revolutionary General, Porfirio Dias. Yglesias, 
with his entire cabinet and some retainers, embarked at Manzunillo on 
the P. M. steamer Granada for Mazaltan on the 17th instant. On reach- 
ing that port it was apparent to all of the officials on board that it was 
unsafe to land, as a battle had been fought the previous day outside the 
town, and the revolutionary General's troops were victorious. The re- 
tainers on board were paid off and disembarked. Don Yglesias, with the 
whole of his cabinet, reached this city on the 25th instant, all in good 
health. Should the tidings from the State of Guerero prove favorable 
they will embark for Acapulco, its seaport, and there form the seat of 
government; otherwise they proceed East, as two of the States on the 
Atlantic seaboard, Tampico and Vera Cruz, still favor their cause. 



ARMED PEACE. 

Peace, typical and orthodox, Through Europe fearful warlike 

Has changed her form, and seems In every council lurk; [shades 

In mien and garb and countenance A shot, a word, and Death mows 

To mock the poet's dreams; The Muscovite and Turk; [down 

Her dove has fled, and o'er her head Yet still, armed to the teeth, she 

A carrion vulture screams; To watch the bloody work, [waits 

The olive drops, and in her hand And still the God of Battles seems 

A naked saber gleams. His fitting place to shirk. 

Stripped of her spotless robes, she And here in the New World the 
Encased in glittering mail ; [standB Is held against the stone, [sword 
Before the flashing of her eyes And brother curses brother as 

Nations and kings turn pale: He hurls the gauntlet down; 

The lips that murmured gentleness The harvest ripens slowly, 

In hoarse defiance rail; But the seed of Death is sown, 

The presence that brought holycalm Yet coward War shrinks back the 
Leaves anguish in its trail. Unnatural Peace looks on. [while 

Better the stirring battle-cry 

Than covert taunts and sneers; 
Better than wordy buffeting 

The clash of shields and spears; 
Better than stifled, cankering hate 

Widows' and orphans' tears; 
Better than Peace with lifted sword 
Grim Mars himself appears. 



EUROPEAN AFFAIRS. 

The situation is virtually the same as before the conference, with the 
exception that, whereas, prior to the assemblage of the Great Powers, 
Turkey was absolute for good or for evil; she is now powerful only for 
good, and utterly incapacitated for evil. For, notwithstanding the check 
that Russia has received, and spite of the withdrawal of the other Pleni- 
potentiaries, the Porte is warned that he is watched, and that he must 
carry out the principles of reform it has promised to effect, but not under 
compulsion. Everything, bo far, appears to be friendly and serene. The 
Continent ought to rejoice that war is averted. Russia particularly should 
inwardly be glad that no drain upon, nor exposure of the weakness of, 
her resources takes place; England complacently accepts the solution of 
her problem; Austria and Germany are satisfied that the Colossus of the 
West has gained no footing on their frontiers; France is delighted at es- 
caping from a position where she was only playing second fiddle under 
pretense of impartiality, and Italy has quite enough to occupy her at 
home to care for a protracted struggle. If the telegraph reports truly, 
the Ottoman Government, having gained the day, is actually patronizing 
the various Governments that presumed to dictate to it. From England 
it demands a financial adviser, from France a military instructor for the 
new gendarmerie which is to protect the new Constitution; the German 
Emperors are entreated to advise upon the new system of reform, and the 
Czar is informed that a special treaty will be entered into with him. 
After all, the Conference did not come into Court with clean hands — there 
was no one without sin that could cast the stone. Look at the sects that 
divide the kingdoms of the Old World — Catholic and Freethinker in 
Spain, the men of the White Flag and the men of the Red Flag in 
France, the bitter feuds between Dissenters and the Established Church 
in England, especially on the question of Church rates and interments; 
regard the jealous animosity between the German, the Magyar and the 
Slav in Austria, and the intense hatred of the Roman Catholic to the 
German Lutheran, headed by Bismarck, and the decrees from the Ger- 
man Emperor limiting the papal powers, and the cry of the Ultramon- 
taines, and then see whether Midhat Pasha had not reason to say, " Re- 
form yourselves and then preach reform at Constantinople. In the mean- 
time we accept your advice, and intend to profit by your suggestions." 



BAD HEALTH ARISING FROM CHOKED SEWERS AND 
IMPURE WATER. 

The city's bill of health continues to grow from bad to worse. Fever, 
in all its varied forms, is rife in our midst. Nearly all of us have |a 
relative, friend, or acquaintance down with disease, the result of the 
malaria that hangs like a death-pall over San Francisco. Never in our 
city's history has there been so much preventable disease stalking abroad. 
When we think of the well-known causes, we only wonder that things 
are not worse. Our word for it, if we do not make haste to remove the 
evils we shall, as surely as effect follows cause, some day be attacked with 
an epidemic like unto that which decimated Buenos Ayres, a city which, 
as its name implies, was naturally noted for its pure air, but which, be- 
cause of its neglect to provide efficient sewerage, and a pure and abundant 
water supply, was overtaken with a scourge that in these latter times has 
hardly known a parallel. The exciting causes to which that epidemic 
was clearly traced are present in our city to a most alarming degree. Our 
sewers are reeking with the miasmatic influences that they are constantly 
giving forth. Water was not passed through them in time to prevent 
their becoming choked; and now, as a consequence, it is impracticable to 
pass it through it at alL The man-holes will all have to be opened, and 
what the effect of letting such effluvia escape may be God only knows. 
Then our ordinarily drinking water has become dangerous to the last 
degree. The long drought has led to the Spring Valley Company's catch- 
ments becoming terribly impure. Bad water leads to all sorts of disease, 
and the city's water at present is bad enough in all conscience. These 
things must be attended to, and that right speedily. 

Judge Ferral's court, on Montgomery street, is likely to be a scene of 
attraction for two or three days on and after Wednesday next. Depos- 
itors and outside stockholders in savings banks might be worse engaged 
than in listening to the testimony. Fleeced depositors and wronged 
stockholders in the late Western Savings and Trust Company will be 
shown by the evidence how they can make good their losses. Candi- 
dates for the Legislature may learn the defects in the law through which 
the savings of the poor are made away with. Much more, which for 
obvious reasons we do not mention, will come out. Visitors had better be 
early, as our witnesses will occupy pretty nearly half the courtroom. 

It is with sincere sorrow that we notice the death, on January 20th, 
of Mattie Palmer, daughter of William H. Rulofson of this city. The 
deceased was a child of infinite promise, and died at the early age of 12 
years and o months. 



.Ian. -J7, 1877. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



9 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

" tl»«*r th* trior What t»»* it*>il art thoa?" 

"On* that will plaj thi> dtvU, «ir. with jou." 



The Black Hills bid ran? t" b« :» popular Summer resort shortly and 

to rival the sit I distoga sou 

milliner's 
■tors in nil! operation. I "\ i I over bj two man mQlinsra, after 

ihe fa*lm>n inaajroratod in Paris bj the oalebratad Worth. < Ins stande at 

outer srttfa a ooeked revolver swarding the till, while the other tries 

.hi bonnets with .i bowls knife between his teeth. There is hardly any 

afternoon, and there is rarely any need "f a 

doctor 1 Sotal hops are mors fashionable than private soirees, 

and mattv «-f tlu 1 danoers lay aside their pistols while participating in the 

snuta 'riii.* orchestral night lw improved, as he has ran out of 
violua strings, end, like many artists* is somewhat addicted to drink. On 
a fine afternoon, when the youth end beauty of Custer City and Dead- 
wood meet en the beautiful promenade lately formed by the wheels of 
the bullock wagons, the most reeAsrcAe toilets may be seen, cardinal red 
he favorite color of the men's shirts. French is spoken altogether 
by— those who do not understand any other language, and the elegance of 
the vehicles as they are whirled along by the high mettled oxen forms a 
scene baffling description. Some excitement prevailed during the last 
election for R&ayor, owing to the opposition to the installation of Black 
Kill by the friends of One-eyed Mike. The diplomacy which exists in all 
fashionable circles, however, avoided any pending trouble, settled the 
D satisfactorily, and tin* former was elected in due form. The lat- 
ter gentleman was interred very handsomely, but, owing to the amount 
of lead in him, it required eight men to carry him. The fashionable 
season ojwns about May. 

A Great deal of rubbish has been written about Mr. Cronin's nose, 
and the papers are, without exception, exaggerating its appearance. 
While in this city Mr. Cronin was interviewed by the T. C, and be is 
therefore enabled to give an exact description of that organ, unbiased by 

al hate and untrammeled by the sordid gold of bribery. An ex- 
amination of Mr. C.'snose discovered the usual vertical septum dividing 
the nas.il /'r/.v.*'/ , together with the turbinated bones which communicate 
with Mr. Cronin's ethmoid, sphenoid, frontal and superior maxillary bones. 
Mr. Cronin's nose externally may be described as a triangular pyramid, 
projecting from the center of his face, immediately above his upper lip. 
The ramifications of the olfactory bulb are peculiarly well developed, as 
are also the sebaceous follicles and his cribriform foramina. The rumor 
that the growth of Mr. C.'s proboscis was accelerated by the presence of 
a pedunculated polypus is entirely untrue. The facts of the case are that 
the pedagogue who kept school in the village where Mr. Cronin lived as a 
child used to punish the children by pulling their noses. There is hardly 
a schoolmate of Oregon's last Elector who has not an enormous nose — 
many of them far larger than the one under discussion. The exuberant 
granulations are not the result of chronic catarrh, and the abuse heaped 
upon Mr. Cronin's nose generally is entirely undeserved. The develop- 
ment should be regarded as highly creditable to him, and future genera- 
tions will look upon its skeleton with pride. 

It is not usual to put advertisements in this column, so the follow- 
ing must be considered an exceptional case : " Wanted, by a steady young 
man, a situation to nurse a rich invalid lady afflicted with an incurable 
disease and without relatives. She must have a sympathetic heart and at 
least §150,000. Address immediately Town Crier, A'eics Letter office." 
The T. C. is aware that his retirement from the rosy and highly overpaid 
fields of journalism will be severely felt in literary circles, but he has 
come to this determination after reading in yesterday's Chronicle the af- 
fecting incident relating how Mrs. Maria Isabel Toomes left Mrs. Butler, 
a printer's wife, 8141,000 as a token of her appreciation of Mrs. B.'s 
neighborly kindness during her last illness. Should this meet the eye of 
any rich, relationless and chddless male or female invalid soon about to 
expire, let him take comfort. For mixing a mustard plaster, uncorking a 
bottle, smoothing a pillow and throwing flat irons at burglars the T. C. 
has no equal on this coast. He refers with pride to the members of the 
Bohemian Club as to his ability to sit up at night, and he is competent 
to soothe the last hours of any sufferer who may apply to him with the 
diverting and innocent recreations of euchre, pedro, backgammon or crib- 
bage. He asks no reward in return except a testamentary document be- 
queathing to him the useless dross and the real and personal property so 
valueless to any one about to become an angel. 

A correspondent, who has eaten at Saulmann's restaurant for several 
years, writes to ask what the proprietor means by putting up pictures of 
hyenas, kangaroos, tigers and skunks on the face of the building he occu- 
pies. The Nevada Stock Exchange, next door, is similarly decorated with 
giraffes, bears, bulls and other animals, but this seems to our querist to be 
less inappropriate. He adds that he is afraid to go into the restaurant 
since it has been turned into a wild-beast show, and concludes his letter 
by saying that fearful groans are nightly heard from the upper stories of 
the house, which are causing all the lodgers in the vicinity to seek new 
quarters. In reply, the T. C. begs to assure the gentleman that he mis- 
understands the entire matter. The fearful-looking pictures merely refer 
to the enticements of an itinerant museum temporarily in our midst and 
located opposite the Alia office. The fearful groans alluded to are caused 
by the united efforts of a brass band and a barrel organ, and are not 
caused by any of the occupants of the menagerie, which are all dead and 
stuffed to repletion. These noises, however, account for the confused 
articles which have lately appeared in the morning newspaper on the other 
side of the street. The music is gradually driving the editor crazy. 

The Call and Bulletin have at length taken up the challenge so 
repeatedly thrown down to them by the Chronicle, and commenced a libel 
suit. It is only fair to warn the last named journal that Pickering and 
Fitch have a very ugly habit of writing editorials with the presumable 
intent to influence the Judges as far as possible before cases come off, 
though luckily for Mr. de Young he will probably have no difficulty in 
getting an injunction. The complaint claims that Loring Pickering's 
character has been damaged to the extent of £5,000 by the Chronicle, 
which statement affords an opportunity for rising young mathematicians 
to distinguish themselves. The problem makes a very pretty equation as 
follows: If P. minus character equals §5,000 plus ^10,000,000 which he 
didn't get, find the value of Fitch plus Czapskay and the amount of dam- 
ages they are likely to obtain from the jury. 



The Gold Hill News draws a happy comparison between a drou 
market h Botl 

only in the oaae of ;i drought ' talifurnia has the 
ii the olergy. « ho 13 iini mil tin 1 1 for a " Why 

should not the Nevada clergy," pra) foi aboi 

1 bedly they ought, to, and the T, (7., who is ai 

primate and grand high prayer Boss ol the Went orders herewith that 
all ministers in California and Nevada shall recite the following pro 
matins until further orders: *' Lord, look down apon these diamond' 
drilled mines in pity, and open up unlimited v. -ins of rich rock to th< ©on- 
fo Ion of the ungodly bears and the relief of thy suffering children; open 
Flood ft 1 n'.rienV hearts with the safe key of thy undino.verahle combina- 
tion of mercy and giant powder; shower upon us the sweet rain of divi- 
dends, and send * Iphir and .1 ustice up higher than Michael, the archangel, 

and we. thy chastened servants, will have more fun and more whisky than 
ever was seen in our city since Con. Virginia was selling at §700, and we 
strictly promise to repent and die exemplary Christian deaths if you will 
only give us this one show to get even with these darned brutes who are 
making their pile on selling short." 

Frenchmen are always in difficulty and having little affairs of honor 
which, on account of the stringency of the laws, are very difficult to settle 
on French soil. The latest affair" of which we have any record is a 
difficulty between Monsieur Salle-Linge-Bottes-de-Boue and the Vicomte 
Jamaismelaver Deteste-Savon. The principals chartered two balloons 
aud ascended to the hight of 1,000 feet just outside Boulogne harbor. 
Mons. Bottesde-Boue had a straw figure in his balloon, which he held up 
to his adversary's view as soon as they had arrived at the necessary alti- 
tude. The Vicomte immediately put six bullets in it, and seeing the 
dummy drop, hid himself in the bottom of the car and prepared to 
descend. At this juncture his adversary opened a fusillade from a 
seventeen-shooting rifle at the gas-bag of Mons. Bottes-de Boue's balloon, 
which materially assisted and so quickened his descent that he fell with 
great rapidity into the sea. The enemy pelted him with ballast and sand- 
bags as he swam ashore, and both parties landed safely shortly afterwards 
with their honor satisfied and avenged. 

The T. C. ia the only member of the press who has as yet successfully 
conversed with Seilur Jose Maria Yglesias, Constitutional President of 
Mexicc. Speaking seventeen languages and frequently dreaming in nine, 
it was mere child's play for him to take down the whole interview in 
Spanish short-hand. This is a system invented by Seiior Pittmano. 
'* t^ue quiere V tomar Seiior Don Yglesias?" we remarked (1. e. How 
many troops had Diaz when you left) ? " Tomans un poco de aguadiente 
y un tabaco," was the answer (about 8,000, as near as 1 can judge). "No 
quiere V comer alguna cosa ?" we asked (what are your intentions as to 
the future)? " Gracias, Sigfior? ahorano! notengo hamlre y soy lleno " 
(as soon as possible we shall return and shed every drop of blood we can 
hire in the holy cause of Mexico's salvation). This terminated the inter- 
view, and six of the staff were immediately detailed to sit on the doormat 
to exclude further interrogators. 

Since the little shooting episode in Oakland last week it is almost 
impossible to get the inhabitants to open their doors after dark. Two 
gentlemen called on a prominent Oaklander this week about 7:30 P. m., 
and were surprised at their host insisting on holding a conversation with 
them from the roof of the house. He was standing behind a large brick 
chimney with a revolver in each hand and a brass helmet on his head. 
After assuring him that they had not come to avenge their honor, but 
merely to pay him a social visit and sample his Bourbon, he descended 
through the trap and finally opened the front door, on the condition his 
visitors threw up their hands while he inspected them with a bull's-eye 
lantern and the rest of his family kept them steadily covered with Re- 
mington rifles, so utterly has public confidence been shaken to the roots 
by the late tragic occurrence. 

The millennium shows rapid signs of being close at hand. A Chronicle 
reporter has refused a bribe of §60 and exposed the c< r apt and venal con- 
duct of the men who gave it him. He did not even change the gold into 
silver and make his little commission on it before handing the blood 
money to his chief. The story sounds incredible, yet it is true; and unless 
it can be proved that the astute quill driver got another twenty from the 
enemy's camp for exposing the matter, the world will be obliged to re- 
luctantly confess that the Ishmaelites of the press are sometimes honest. 
The nobility of this particular reporter is further apparent, when it is 
added that he implicated a journalist on a rival paper in the affair, got 
him discharged and deprived a wife and family temporarily of support. 

Cake and wine is undoubtedly a nutritious diet. At least so thinks 
Mr. Tapscott, a demented legal luminary, who abstracted two bottles of 
wine from Kohler& Frohling's window on Thursday morning by adroitly 
breaking the window. An examination of Mr. T.'s trunks revealed four 
large fruit cakes, each of which had been cut. The police at once con- 
fiscated the cakes, and at eight o'clock last evening there were three 
officers in the prison hospital suffering from the effects of an overfeed on 
the contents of Mr. Tapcott's larder. The Asylum at Napa will presum- 
ably be Mr. T.'s future home. 

The latest improvement in electric calls has just been placed in the 
new rooms of a fashionable club in this city. By turning a needle a 
member can summon a messenger, a coupe", a hack, a doctor, a ton of coal, 
a policeman, telegraph boys from the Western Union, the Atlantic and 
Pacific, one or two policemen as desired, the Fire Brigade, a nurse, wet or 
dry, an undertaker, a bouquet vender or a minister of the gospel. The 
inventor feels that it is as yet far from complete, and is about to add sixty- 
new combinations to his invaluable machine. 

Mr. Bottles has been elected a School Trustee in Texas. He was the 
nominee of a joint cork-us. — (Alta). Mr. Bottles is a most useful man 
when he is full, but being short-sighted is of little use without glasses. 
Last Christmas he gave every child a hat, remarking, " These are the 
capsule wear." Bottles nearly died once, and the doctors came to open 
him, he lay so flat, but he was well up the next day, and gave no signs of 
sickness except frothing at the mouth. Pass it along. 

The ' ' Call " of yesterday gives a description of an invention called a 
" washing list." It is supposed to be a check on dishonest laundrymen, 
but it is difficult to see how the subject could be of interest to Mr. Pick- 
ering. Clean linen is scarcely his forte, A new hair dye is far more in 
his line. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 27, 1877. 



BLARNEY. 

A lake-side dweller, young and fair, 

The dearest little maid in Kerry, 
With blue-gray eyes and blue-black hair, 

And Lips as red as any cherry. 
No shoe or stocking to her mime, 

"Which was but simple Kitty Brady — 
And yet a lord from England came 

Imploring her to be his lady. 
She had another worshipper — 

The boldest boy about Killarney, 
With only love to offer her, 

A little cabin, and — the blarney. 
She favored him with many a glance, 

Until the lord came on the tapis ; 
She smiled on him at wake and dance, 

And Paddy as a king was happy. 
The lord was just a trifle glum — 

The moral of an English lover! 
But sure, if he,d been deaf and dumb, 

His jingling gold could talk one over. 
" In silk and satin you shall dress, 

And I will give you jewels," said he, 
" To twine in every glossy tress, 

Sweet Kate, if you will be my lady." 

Och, but them words were eloquent! 

Poor Kitty was no more than human, 
And very fond of ornament^ 

Like every reasonable womau. 
" 'Tis true, Pat coorts me best, but still " — 

Thought she — " tho' with the talk he's ready, 
Arrah, let folks say what they will, 

It's mighty fine to be my lady ! " 
And so she wouldn't look at Pat, 

In vain he watched for her and sought her, 
Until one eveninsr, when he sat 

Just flinging pebbles in the water, 
His downcast face and heavy sigh 

Might have moved even stones to pity; 
And she passed, gaily tripping by, 

His worse than stony-hearted Kitty. 
She tried to pass, I mean — as cool 

As any cucumber or melon ; 
But though in love, Pat was no fool, 

He sprang to meet his truant Helen. 
She would not take his outstretched band ; 

"An' is it you, Miss Kitty Brady," 
Says he, " that's got so stiff an' grand ? — 

Good-morrow to ye, thin, my lady! 
"But Kate, agra, now stop and spake, 

If but to tell me what's come o'er you — 
Or is it that your eyes are wake, 

An' you can't see me here before you ? 
Och, sure, alanna, youVe no call 

To murder people at your pleasure, 
An' I can't live at all at all 

Without your purty self, my threasure. 

"That Englisher has wealth, galore — 

A rint-roll longer than my arm; 
Why Bhould he stale from me, asthore, 

That's niver done him any harm ? 
Just give me something he's not got, 

An' that's your own thrue heart, my honey; 
Sure, then, I wouldn't change my lot 

With him for all bis dirty money." 
And what is little Kate to do ? 

She laughs, and frowns, and sobs and blushes ; 
"Och. Pat, I give it up to you, 

You'd charm a bird from off the bushes! 
Well, just to save your Life, machree, 

An' not because I care about you, 
I'll think it over" — so said she — 
"But I could live an' thrive without you!" 
And now to tell the lord of it, 

No wonder if he's rather crusty. 
But little Kate has Irish wit 

That's never suffered to grow rusty. 
"Sure, if your honor I refuse, 

It's weLL for you — och ! botheration — 
Whin it's yourself can pick an' choose 

Prom all the grandeur of the nation. 
"An I would look a holy show, 

Drest in the beautifullest bonnet, 
Even if all the flowers that grow, 

An' feathers, too, was stuck upon it ; 
An' in a sthreelin' satin gown, 

I'd still be only Kitty Brady — 
Sure, thin, if I'd the queen's goold crown, 

'Twouldu't make a raal lady." 
At first his lordship felt the cross, 

Being unaccustomed to rejection, 
But thinking, "It's the girl's own loss!" 

Pound comfort in that wise reflection. 
And ere he left our island green, 

He saw a wedding at Killarney, 
And drank in genuine potheen, 

" Success forever to the blarney! " 

— Janet Tuckey, in " Temple Bar." 



There are 1,622 newspapers and periodicals 
published in the German Empire. 



Southern pacific railroad 

northern division. 

Commencing- \«v. 6th, 1870, Passenger 
Trains will leave San Francisco from Passenger l>e- 
pot on T ownsend street as follows: 

8 A A.M (daily) for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Tres 
• 0\_/ Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all Way 
Stations. &^5~At Pajabo connects with the Santa 
Cruz Railroad forApros and Santa Citrz. At Salinas 
connects with the M. & S. V. It. R. fur Montehev. Stage 
connections made with this train. 



HO Pi A. si- (daily) foiJIenlo Park and Wav Sta- 

3 9^ P«M. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
*^*J Gilroy and Way Stations. 



4,40 



p.m. (daily) for San Jose and Way Stations. 



C OA p.m. (daily) for San Mateo and Way Stations. 



SOUTHERN DIVISION. 

gW* Passengers for points on the Southern Division 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Kail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner. Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton and Indian Wells 
A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 
J. L. Willcutt, Gen'l Passenger and Ticket Agent. 
[November 18.] 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing Tuesday, January 16, 1877, and until 

further notice, Trains and Boats will Leave 

San Francisco: 

(Overland Ticket Office, at Ferry Landing, foot of 
Market Street.) ___ __________ 



7AA A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
•V" Street Wharf) —Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stage connection for Sonoma, Calistoga, Wood- 
land, Williams. Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 

(Sundays excepted) for Woodland, Williams and 
Knight's Landing. (Arrive 8:10 p.m.) 



8nn A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
•"" land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding and Portland (O.), Colfax, Reno, Ogdcn and Oma- 
ha. Connects at Gait with train arriving at lone at 
3:40 p.m. (Arrive 5:35 p.m.) 



3AA P.M. (daily)San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
AJ\J i an d Ferry), stopping at all Way Stations. Ar- 



s at San Jose at 5:30 p.m. 



(Arrive 9:35 a.m.) 



4f\fi P.M. (daily) Express Train (via Oakland Ferry), 
• VJU f or Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall, San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara, 
"Los Angeles," Wilmington, Anaheim, San Diego, Col- 
ton and Indian Wells (Arizona Stage Connection). Con- 
nects at Niles with train arriving at San Jose at 6:55 
p.m. " Sleeping Cars " between Oakland and Los Ange- 
les. (Arrive 12:40 p.m.) 



4 A A P. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market St. 
• V/vf Wharf), connecting with trains for Calistoga, 
Woodland, Williams, and Sacramento; and at Sacramen- 
to with Passenger Train, leaving at 9:15 p. u. for 
Truckee, Reno, Carson and Virginia City. "Sleeping 
Cars " between Vallejo and Carson. 
(Sundays excepted) for Napa and Calistoga. 

(Arrive 11:10 A.M.) 



4AA P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
,\J\J (from Market St. Wharf), for Benicia and Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking the third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sac- 
ramento at 9:00 a.m., daily. (Arrive 8:00 p.m.) 



A OA P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Freight 
^t.O" Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, arriving at 


Los Angeles on second day at 11:15 A.M. 


(Arrive 7:30 A.M. 


FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS. 


From "SAlrf FRANCISCO." 




So 

b 
> 




WE 




B 


TO 

OAKLAND. 


» 




a 


r 








o»ep 








'A 7.00 


p 3.30 


A 7.00 


A 7.30 


A 8.00 


A 8.00 


A 7.30 




7.30 


4.00 


8.00 


8.30 


t9.30 


t9.30 


11.00 




8.00 


4.30 


9.00 


9.30 


Ptl.00 


p 3.00 


4.00 




8.30 


5.00 


10.00 


p 1.00 


3.00 


4.00 


5.00 




9.00 


5.30 


12.00 


3.30 


4.00 


ts.io 


6.00 


o 


9.30 


6.00 


p 2.00 


4.30 


ts.io 


c °* 




< 

a 


10.00 


6.30 


4.00 


5.30 




8 3 


b 


11.00 


7.00 


5.00 


6.30 










12.00 


8.10 


6.00 


7.00 


^ 


c» § 






p 1.00 


9.20 




8.10 


O d • 


■VOT 


c **a 




2.00 


10.30 




9.20 


_3_J J 














10.30 


211 














f? (A 0.10 




p-3.00 


A 6.10 


A 8.30 


= _ rll.45 




•7.00 


11.00 




»fl 




2 g 
_ 






*s.io 

*11.45 


p 11.45 




«3 
















%,± (.110 30 


p 1.30 


All.00 


A10.30 






A 9.00 




p 1.30 
»10.30 


11.30 

P12.30 








»•( rl2.30 






p 1.30 


To FERNSIDE— except Sundavs— 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 A.M., 








and 


) P.M. 









To "SAN FRANCISCO." 



(t. 7.30 

10.30 

P 4.00 

5.0« 

6.00 



S-H a 



( 

I A 5.40 






A 7.00 
8.03 
9.00 

p 3.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.08 ! 

*K'.00| 



At6.4^ 

7.55 

11.15 

til. 45 

p 3.40 






si. 



AT7.0S 
8.15 
11.35 

ptiaos 

4.03 

t4.45 



PROM ALAMEDA. 



1*5.00 

*5.40 
»10.20 



F*1220 

1.30 



5 ) a 9.00 

| ) 12.00 

lp 1.30 



from ALAMEDA. 



A10.00 1 All.00 IP 12.00 
I I 1.00 



A 6.40 
7. 

8.40 
9.40 
10.40 

r 12.40 
2.40 
4.40 
5.40 
6.40 
7.50 
9.00 
10.10 



A 5.10 
5.50 



AH. 40 
p 1.26 



OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 



A 0.50 
7.20 
7.50 
8.25 
8.50 
9.20 
9.50 
10.50 
11.50 

p 12.50 
2.50 
3.20 
3.50 



A10.2I 

11.20 

p 12.20 



• 4.20 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 
6.30 
6.50 
8.00 
9.10 

10.20 



A 5.20 

6.00 

p 1.50 



From FERNSIDE -Sundays excepted— 6.55, 3.00, 11.05 

A. M., and 6.05 p. u. 

•Change Cars at "Broadway," Oakland. 

A— Morning, p — Afternoon. 



CREEK FERRY BOAT "CAPITAL" 

Will run (tide permitting) from 6:00 A.M to 5:00 P.M., £ 
follows : 







jEAVE 


Leave 


5 


SAN FRANCISCO 


OAKLAND 


" 


(Market 
9:25-,. 


St. Station.) 
...-3:05 .... 


(Broadway Wharf.) 


16 


8:15— ....-11:30- 


17 


10:10-. . 


..—3:35—.... 


9:00— ....-12:00-- 


18 


11:15-.. 


...—4:05—.... 


10:00 .... 1:00- 


19 


10:45-.. 


...—4:45—.... 


6:45— ....-12:15- 


20 


12:15-.. 


..—4:45 .... 


7:00— ....—1:45-- 


21 


1:00-.. 


...—3:35—.... 


8:00 .... 2:00- 


22 


8:05-.. 


...—4:45 — .... 


6:30 .... 3:30- 


23 


7:15-.. 


..—5:00—.... 


6:00-....— 8:30- 


24 


10:00-.. 


. .. — — 


8:00-....—....- 


25 


10:45-.. 


. .. — — ... . 


8:00— .... — ....- 


m 


8:30-.. 


..-11:45—.... 


7:00— ... .—9:45- 


9.7 


8:30-.. 


..-12:30-.... 


7:00— ....-10:00- 


28 


9:10-. . 


.. 1:30- .... 


8:00— ....-10:45- 


29 


8:30-.. 


..-2:15—.... 


7:00— -10:00- 


30 


9:30-. . 


..—2:55—.... 


8:00— ....-10:50 


31 


10:50-. . 


.. 3:20 .... 


9:30— ....-12:10- 



For dates omitted, use prior date. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 



THOMAS 



PRICE'S ASSAY OFFICE 
— AND— 
CnElUICAL HBOBATORT, 

Sacramento Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



524 

Deposits of bullion received, melted 
into bars, and returns made in from 24 to 48 
hours. Bullion can be forwarded to this Office from any 
part of the interior by Express and returns made in the 
same manner. Careful Analysis made of Ores, Metals, 
Soils, Waters, Industrial Products, etc. Mines examined 
and reported upon. Consultations on Chemical and 
Metallurgical questions. 

Charges: Gold and Silver Bullion. 

Gold Bars on all amounts below $1,000 §2 00 

Gold Bars on all amounts above $1,600 \ per cent. 

Silver Bars on all amounts below $400 $2 00 

Silver Bars on all amounts above $400 £ per cent. 

Dore Bars for the Gold $2 00 

Dore Bars for the Silver \ per cent. 

Determination of Gold and Silver in any alloy $2 00 

Ores. 

Assay for Gold and Silver 83 00 

Assay for Gold, Silver and Lead 5 00 

Assay for Gold, Silver and Copper 5 00 

Assay for Copper 3 00 

Assay for Iron 3 00 

Assay for Tin 5 00 

Assay for Quicksilver 5 00 

Assay for Manganese , 5 00 

Assay for Chromium 5 00 

Test for any single metal 2 00 

Analyses. 

Qualitative Analysis of Ores $10 00 to $25 00 

Qualitative Analysis of Water 25 00 

Quantitative Analysis of Water 75 00 

Quantitative Analysis of Guano 25 00 

Proximate Analysis of Coal 10 00 

Quantitative Analysis of Coal 50 00 

Complete Analyses, qualitative and quantitative, of com- 
plex substances at special rates. [Aug. 5. 



JOSEPH GILLOTTS SI EEL PENS. 

Sold by all Stationers throughout the 
World. Sole Agent for the United States : MR. 



HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. 



Jan. 16. 



H. H. MOORE. 
ealer in Books for Libraries. —A large 

assortment of fine and rare books just received, 
ano for sale at Wu Montgomery street, near Merchant, 
San Francisco Oct. 24. 



D e 



.Inn. iff, 1877, 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



NOTABILIA. 



New Verson of an Old Song : 
Of all th- ffllU \l- Dl t""r 

. liki- pretty Sally, Tbu pura brand from tin- valley; 
in- Long may the Qerka wine be found 
Ai LOandki ' Uloy. At 10 and 13 Jones Alley. 

Some idea >>f toe extent of the wardrobe Bin. Ploronoe baa for wear 
. be Ui*t hty Dollar," may be obtained from the fact that it tills 

twelve larg* tronJta. There an tear dc one for each act Which 

wen made by Worth, the famous "man-mUlmer," especially for this 

19,000, but an aald to be worth much moron 
Sli-. I rv now that ihe gol them from Paris, as she is con- 

.,!■■ House of .1. .t. O'Brien ft Co., BW t.>*r_'s Market, 
has |ost as 1 tafai mon reaaonable price. 



It is hard v< snow an American anything which cannot be disputed. 

the disputable land, One thine no sensible American ever >M j 

ad that i- the excellence of Bush & Milnee' gas-fixtures. This 

tinn is ill-- agent for the new Silicated Carbon Filter, which nmovea al] 

impuritii - from water, and destroys all traces of animal or vegetable life. 

.n till them from a* mud puddle, and the Bltrationis just :» perfect 

They can be seen at the store on New Montgomery street, imder the 

Grand Hotel _ __ 

It is agonizing to see a young man escort your girl to the cars, car- 
rying an umbrella which he borrowed from you the day before. 

Piano playing has sadly interteroil with the art of running cooking 

mil.- a family has a Union liange, which runs itself. Dp La Mon- 

lanya. on Jackson street, is agent for these excellent stoves, which take 

ioecedence of all others in point of draught, small consumption of fuel, 
leating and baking power, besides convenience of arrangement. Mr. 
1 to La Montanya has an immense stock of all kinds of hardware, which 
costs in 'thing to inspect, and which every one, contemplating housekeeping, 
should visit. 

George H. H.— Does she share her mother's objection to you? If she 
does, your case is hopeless; but if she be for you, one of those days her 
mother will see herseU compelled to yield. A good plan would be to 
ask them both to lunch at Swain's Bakery, on Sutter st., above Kearny. 
A delicate repast there will certainly change the mother's opinion of you, 
and soften her heart at once. Be sure and give her some hot English 
muffins. 

Mrs. Swissbelm intimates that Tilden is an emissary of Satan, Grant 
a fallen angel, and Hayes an amiable ass, who is liable to do more damage 
than either. She also intimates that A. P. Hotaling is a ministering an- 
gel, because he is sole agent for the " Old Cutter Whisky." Methuselah 
used nothing else for the last four hundred years of his life, and only died 
from want of it. A. P. Hotaling's address is 429 & 431 Jackson street. 



If a man is in the station-house, and not very full, he can be bailed 
out without much tro uble. 

"How many a race I should have lost," said Hickox the other day, 
"but for one thing." " What's that?" we asked, as we trotted the News 
Letter team of gray mares down the Cliff House road at a 2.30 gait. "It 
is," replied Hickox, "that, like you, I never use uny other harness except 
Main & Winchesters', which I consider the best in the world." Their 
store ia at 214 Battery street. • 

Dr. E. de F. Curtis, M. D., etc. , may be consulted at his office and 
residence, 520 Sutter street, between Powell and Mason streets, daily, 
from 10 a. IS. to 3 P. M., and from 6 to 8 P. M.; on Sundays from 11 to 2 
only. N. B. — Dr. Curtis' medical publications can be obtained from 
A. L. Bancroft & Co., sole agents for the Pacific coast, or from the 
author. Dr. Curtis, 520 Sutter street, S. F. 



The European Conference has produced nothing but discord, and, 
so far, has done nothing to settle the European question. It is believed 
that a pleasant conclusion might have been arrived at, and harmony 
would certainly have prevailed, if the Conference had opened their pro- 
ceedings by a performance on a Hallet & Davis piano. .Their melody is 
incomparable. Badger, 13 Sansome street, is the agent. 

A Backslider — The man who slid along three feet of sidewalk on his 
back, and got up making some remarks. 



Hens are at a stand-still when they will neither lay nor set. It is very 
poor policy depending on hens, when S. Foster & Co., 36 California street, 
are agents for the condensed eggs, one tin of which contains the equiva- 
lent of twelve fresh {not doubtful) eggs. For all cooking purposes they 
are as good, and cheaper, than the freshly laid offerings of the meek-eyed 
fowl. Housekeepers, try them! 

There is nothing to be gained by interviewing a man who has noth- 
ing in him. There is a good deal to be gained by interviewing F & P. J. 
Cassin, 523 Front street. They keep the best and purest stock of family 
liquors in the city, and you need never be afraid of sending a friend away 
with a headache, if you only entertain hiin with goods purchased from 
them. 

Never turn up your nose with cold disdain. It might freeze that 
way. And then think how pretty you would look if you went to Brad- 
ley & Rulofsons' to get photographed. It is true that they take the best 
photographs in the world, and their convex, or raised photo, has all the 
appearance of a bas-relief. Their gallery is a perfect treasure-house. 

There are six women in the Black Hills and only one milliner's 
shop. 

The darkest conspiracies may be revealed, and the flimsiest pretexts 
seen through, if a man only wears Midlers pebble spectacles. His selec- 
tion of opera glasses and optical goods is the largest and best in the city. 



This i weather that enables a nu bo wear i paper oollar 

"H :i Ion ml allows him to turn ii and wear it baod again, it 

i . too, when .» brighl fire and ;. ooey arm chair are In 
. an evening. V P. Cole. 220 to 236 Bueh st., make the '■■ 
e found anywhere. 



A man oannot be ■ tpeoted to live on salt mackerel and keep hi- tem- 
perance pled e, 



Tennyson, in his pretty poem of the "Brook," lays "but I flow 
forever. The same may be said <-t the exhaustless springs at No 



low on 
i. is be said of tbe exhaustless springs at Napa, 
which, in their Bow, yield the most precious mineral water known to the 
world. Bfapa Soda is indeed the Luxury of the age, and an invaluable 
discos 'tv. 



VERDICT ALWAYS FOE THE DAVIS' VERTICIL FEED SEWING 
MACHINE. 

Tbe Ccn ten n la] (..old Modal and Diploma. 1876 J the Scott 
Uedal, 1876 . the Franklin institute Modal, it+74. The Repon ol the Centennial 
Commission raja: "The DAVIS la awarded the Grand Gold Medal "i Honor and 
Diploma of Merit for excellent material and construction, adapted i<> the greatest 
r.in-.' hi wi-rk." We claim sales unprecedented, and satisfaction universal In Ltd 
construe) ion it differs from .ill others, and i* equaled i>\ tiouo. As on earnest ol b ha1 
is here claimed, the Manufacturers challenge all others tor ;l friendly contest, either 
for amusement or a more substantial consideration. The Famllv Machine iu light 
running and easily comprehended ; basan Ingenious dci lee " t» take up" tost motion 
or wear, which, to a machinist, is positive proof ol durability. We are pleased t<> 

refer tu inui'liiiK'S in in;imifnct tiring establishments here, whore thej have been in 

constant use for nearly three years, to verify the above. Has received more medals 
ami complimentary testimonials than any other in tbe same length of time. Manu- 
facturers are especially invited to examine our No. l, just out. Agents wanted in 
all unoccupied territory. MARK. SHEUJON, Gen'l Agent for tbe Pacific Coast, 
Dec. 23. No. ISO Post street 

BOOKS F :R PRESENTS! 

A Splendid Collection of Elegantly Illustrated ami Beauti- 
fully tJound Works, consisting Of the Finest l-.ditions of Standard Authors, 
including AMERICA'S ADVANCEMENT, replete mth magnificent illustrations by 
t'n, publisher of the " Art Journal," elegantly bound in full morocco. INDIA AND 
ITS NATIVE PRliNCES, in full morocco gilt. WORK ON ITALY, by Anthony Trol- 
lope, beautifully illustrated. DORE'S SPAIN. LACROIX EIGHTEENTH CEN- 
TURY, Shakspeare, Scott, Dickens, Bulwer, etc., in new and elegantly bound edi- 
tions. Picture Galleries, including the Grand Sets of the Musee Franeaise. Gilray 
and Hogarth's Works. Illustrated Works of Gustave Dore in French and English. 
Also, Albums, Bibles, Prayer Pooka, Photographic Works, and Children's Books in 
great variety. For sale by H. H. MOORE, b'0t) Montgomery st., near Merchant. 
Catalogues now ready. Dec. 23. 

A. S. HALLIDE, 

Importer, I>ealer a ml Manufacturer of Wire Goods, Wire 
Rope, Wire Screens, Iron and Brass Battery Cloth, etc. Wire Screens for win- 
dows and doors, and all kinds of Wire Work on hand and made to order. Sole Agent 
for Torrey's Weather Strips, to exclude dust and rain, and Holloway's Fire Extin- 
guisher. Proprietor of the Patent Endless Ropeway. Experienced workmen always 
on hand to fit up orders. California Wire Works : (i CALIFORNIA ST. Dec. 23. 

F. C. Snow,] SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. [W. B. May. 

SNOW A MAT, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pictures, Frames, Moldings, and Artists' Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



OPENING OF R4RE AND ELEGANT ROOKS! 

HI!. Moore takes pleasure iu announcing- that having re- 
e turned from his annual purchasing trip to the great Eastern and European 
Literary Depositories, that be bus received and now has open the largest assortment 
of ANTIQUE and MODERN LITERATURE ever before brought to this city, con- 
sisting of many old and rare books, and other novelties in literature. No one can 
fail to find tbe most acceptable HOLIDAY PRESENT for either old or young, male or 
female, amongst our varied stock. Gift Books in Great Variety. Call and examine 
our stock. [Dec. 16.] H. H. MOORE, 609 Montgomery street. 

R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

Notice.— The Trade and the Public Generally are informed 
that we receive tbe genuine LOUIS RoEDERfcR CARTE BLANCHE CHAM- 
PAGNE, direct from MR. LOUIS ROL'DERER, RhlMS, over his signature and Con- 
sular invoice. Each case is marked upon the side, " Macondray 6c Co., San Fran- 
cisco," and each bottle bears the label, " Macondray & Co., Sole Agents for the Pa- 
cific Coast." MACONDRAY & CO., 
Dec. 30. Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 

AN EXTRAORDINARY RAZOR 

Has been invented by the Queen's Own Company of En- 
gland, tbe edge and body of which is so thin and flexible as never to require 
grinding, and hardly ever setting. It glides over tbe face like a piece of velvet, 
making shaving quite a luxury. It is creating a great excitement in Europe among 
the experts, who pronounce it PERFECTION. $2 for buffalo handles, §3 for ivory"; 
by mail, 10 cents extra. The trade supplied on liberal terms by tbe sole agents in the 
United States. NATHAN JOSF.PH & CO., 
September 3. No. 641 Clay street, S. F. 

NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers and Dealers iu Painters' Materials, House, Sign 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Juckson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 

THE GOLF OF CALIFORNIA OYSTER AND CANNING COMPANY. 

The Books of the Company are now open for subscription 
for a limited amount of capital stock. Address or apply at the office of the 
Company, NO. 330 PINE STREET, San Francisco, Cal. 
95L Shareholders will have the preference in the purchase of goods. 
Nov. 25. W. SALTER MANNING, Secretary. 

WILLIAM HARNEY, 
otary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, northwest cor- 
ner of Montgomery and Sacramento streets, San Francisco, office of Madison 
ke. Aprii 29. 



N' 



F 



QUICKSILVER. 
or sale— In lots to salt, by Thomas Bell, No. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 10. 



F 



NOTICE. 
or the very best photographs go to Bradley A Itulofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 27, 1877. 



JUDGE WHEELERS INJUNCTION LAW KNOCKED 
HIGHER THAN A KITE. 

The Liberty of the Press Maintained-- An. Injunction to Re- 
strain the Publication of Future Libels Declared a 
Legal Absurdity* 

Owing to the law's delay, we cannot get Wheeler's monstrously 
absurd injunction set aside at this term of the Supreme Court. But, 
whilst in the meanwhile we have to suffer from its illegality, it is comfort- 
ing to receive a complete exposure of its injustice and unconstitutionality 
from a high American court of appeals* The Central Imw Journal, just 
to hand, reports the following case which, it will be seen, is exactly par- 
allel to our own, even to the imitating of Clay's ridiculous allegations 
against the News Letter. We say ridiculous, because it is most absurd to 
say that a man who owns a valuable newspaper property, and whose per- 
son is here, cannot respond for any reasonable damages that may be as- 
sessed against him. The decision has peculiar interest for judges, law- 
yers, the press, and the reading, liberty-loving citizen: 

LIFE ASSOCIATION OP AMERICA vs. BOOGHEE. 

St. Louis Court of Appeals, December, 1876. 

Hon. Thos-T. Gantt, Presiding Judge; Hon. Edward A. Lewis, Hon. Robert 

A. Bakewell, Judges. 

1. Libel— Dependant Insolvent — Injunction.— Coarts of Equity have no 
power to enjoin the publication of a threatened libel, thongh its publisher be in60 
vent, and the damage, therefore, irreparable. 

2. Constitution Of Missouri. —Such power is expressly denied in Missouri 
by the termB of the Constitution. 

Appeal I'rom St. Louis Circuit Court. 

/. Z. Smith, and B. A, Clover, for appellant ; W. H. H. Russell, JR. W. Ooode and 
Marshall t 6 Barclay, for respondent. 

Gantt, J., delivered the opinion of the Court: 

The life Association of America, a corporation engaged in the business of life 
assurance at St. Louis, filed its petition charging that Boogher and one Taylor had 
been for a long time engaged in the composition, publication and circulation of 
falee, slanderous, malicious and libelous statements (setting them forth) respects 
ins the plaintiff, and that they threatened still further to circulate and publish 
orally, in writing, and in print, said false, slanderous, malicious and libelous 
statements, for the purpose of injuring, and in order to levy blackmail on the 

Elaintiff; that the said Boogher and Taylor were wholly insolvent and irresponsi- 
le, and that plaintiff had therefore no available recourse to an action for dam- 
ages ; and it asked for a restraining order to prevent the further publication of 
the libel, and the infliction on plaintiff of irreparable injury thereby. 

This petition was verified by affidavit, and the Court granted a preliminary in- 
junction, which was afterwards dissolved upon a demurrer and motion, at the return 
term. Tbc plaintiff dismissed the suit as to Taylor. 

The demurrer assigned for reasons, that the petition showed no case for equi- 
table relief; that it prayed for what the Constitution of the State forbade ; that a 
court of equity had no jurisdiction to restrain the publication of a libel, and that 
the application for a restraining order was not seasonably made. The Court sus- 
tained the demurrer, dissolved the injunction, dismissed the petition, and assessed 
damages on the injunction bond. Plaintiff appealed to this Court. 

We are told in the petition, by way ef aggravating the offense of the libeler, 
that his purpose was to levy " blackmail " on the plaintiff. No explanation is 
given of tbis phrase, and its ase is hardly justifiable ; for it cannot be considered 
quite intelligible. It certainly cannot be called plain English. Originally, we 
learn from philological authority, it had a definite but provincial meaning familiar 
to tlie country periodically devastated by Highland robbers. It was, indeed, the 
tribute levied by these last on the peaceable and nnwarlike inhabitants of the 
lowlands ol" Scotlaud, which, being paid promptly and at regular intervals, waB a 
substitute for complete spoliation. In this country, the phrase has been Boraetimes 
used in a metaphorical sense to signify any unlawful exaction of money by an ap- 
peal to the fears of the victim ; and we may conjecture that this UBeof it was in- 
tended by the draughtsman of this petition. Bnt this conjecture cannot supply 
the demand made by the universal rule of pleading that the complaint should set 
forth in plain language a statement of the facts constituting the plaintiffs cause 
of action. In the case before ns, no change will have been made in the opinion 
we express by tbis failure to explain the circumstances or aggravation which are 
charged ; for enough is stated to inform us that defendant has uttered a malicious, 
false, scandalous and libelous statement respecting the plaintiff, and that, with 
the purpose of inflicting injury on the plaintiff, defendant purposes and threatens 
to repeat and enlarge the wrong and injary inflicted ; that the resulting loss to the 
plaintiff will be great, and irreparable by civil action because of the insolvency 
of the defendant ; and thereupon the aid of a court of justice is claimed to pre- 
vent that for which, if perpetrated, it cannot give compensation. 

It is obvious that, if this remedy be giver, on the ground of the insolvency of 
the defendant, the freedom lo speak and write, which is secured by the Constitu- 
tion of Missouri to all its citizens, will be enjoyed by a man able to respond in 
damages to a civil action, and denied to one who has no property liable to an ex- 
ecution. We are of opinion that this discrimination was not intended by the fra- 
me rs of theorganic la*v. **#***** 
In such a case as this petition states, there is a punishment provided by the 
criminal law. It is no answer to say that tbis punishment is not adequate. 
Courts do not listen to such objections. It is undeniable that in snch a case as 
the petition shows, the party slandered may have an action for damages. But in 
Buch an action, irrespective of the suggestion of the absolute insolvency of the de- 
fendant, there is much room for saying that the legal remedy falls short of making 
full compensation for injury done, or of giving fall protection against injury 
threatened. To infer from this that recourse mdy be had to the preventive juris- 
diction of a court of equity, is clearly not allowable. No human institutions are 
perfect. That a judgment for damages is less efflcacionB to compensate or to de- 
ter when the defendant is insolvent, is largely dne to the prohibition of imprison- 
ment for debt. The exemption of a limited amount of a debtor's property from 
execution, will, in many instances disarm a judgment of its terrors, at least in 
part. Yet these exemptions of the person and property of the defendant are part 
of the system under which we live, and coarts of justice sit to administer, not to 
criticise this system. It remains true that a judgment for damages against any 
one, though incapable of enforcement so long as his pecuniary condition is very 
low, can seldom or never be a matter of indifference to the judgment-debtor; that 
even when capable of complete enforcement, its moral effect will vary with the 
peculiar disposition of the defendant, and that the practical result is that the 
difference between the influence of such a judgment upon a person in a condition 
of Insolvency, and one in prosperous circumstances, is only one of degree- 
In Great Britain, there is no such thing as what we understand by the term or- 
ganic law. The king, lords and commons of that country can, whenever so 
minded, effect any conceivable change in the institutions of the United Kingdom. 
Hence, there is no fundamental or constitutional law in that country, securing 
freedom of speech or of the press, though there is no land in which that freedom 
is practically more assured. But not even in that country, where the rigid re- 
straints which bind our government do not exist, have any of its coarts, since the 
abolition of the Court of Star Chamber asserted the jurisdiction which the plain- 
tiff invokes. When, in the hurry of a trial nisiprius, an expression fell from the 
lips of the presiding jurige, tending to the assertion of such jurisdiction, or rather 
UoagEnfng such a jurisdiction to be vested in another court, the intimation, though 
plainly obiter dictum, alarmed the vigilanee of the English Bar, and occasioned an 



unmistakable protest. In the case of Du Doet vs. Beresford, 2 Campb. 511, Lord 
Elleuborough, at nisi prim, let such an expresion fall. This was in 1H10, a time 
when Tory views of government were in the ascendant. In the edition of the 
State Trials, by Howell, in 1816 {vol. 23, note to page 79tf+ , the learned and careful 
editor, annotating the case of Rex vs. Home, tried before Lord Mansfield in 1777, 
say;-: "Not unconnected with the law of libel upon which Mr. Home said so much 
in this case, Is the dictum of Lord Ellenboroiigh in the case of Du Bo3t vs. Beres- 
ford, 2 Campbell's Nisi Priue, R. 511, being an action for destroying a picture 
which was publicly exhibited, but which was largely defamatory of a gentleman 
and bis wife, who was defendant's sister, Lord Ellenborongh (C.J.BvK.) said ' If 
it was libel upon the persons introduced into it, the law cannot consider it valua- 
ble as a picture. Upon an application to the Lord Chancellor, he would have 
granted an injunction against its exhibition, and the plaintiff was both civily and 
crimiualy liable for having exhibited it.' " " I have been informed by very high 
authority," proceeds Mr. Howell "that the promulgation of this doctrine rela- 
ting to the Lord Chancellor's injunction excited great astonishment in the minds 
of all the practitioners of the courts of equity, and I had apprehended that this 
must have happened, since I believe there is not to be found in the books any deci- 
sion or any dictum posterior to the days of the Star Chamber, from which such 
doctrine can be deduced, either directly or by inference or analogy, unless, Indeed, 
we are lo except the proceedings of Lord Ellenborough's predecessor, Scrogga 
and his associates, in the case of Henry Care, in which case it was ordered 
that the hook entitled the Weekly Packet of Advice from Rome, or the 
History of Popery, be not further printed by any person whomsoever." 
The case of Care is to be found in 7 Howell's State Trials, p, 11L1. A case 
was tried in 1C80, in the reign of Charles II.; Scrnggs, C. J., presided, and Jeffries 
prosecuted. This, it seems, furnished the only precedent since the abolition of the 
Court of Star Chamber, on whieh Lord Ellenborough could have relied. The law, as 
laid down in England by Lord Eldon, in 2 Swanston 412, 418, Gee vs. Pritehard, and 
by Lord Langdale, in 11 Beavan, p. 112, Clark vs. Freeman, and In New York bv 
Chancellor Walworth, in 8 Paige, 24, Brandreth vs. Lance, utterly repudiates the de- 
cision of Scroggs and the unguarded dictum of Lllenborough. The last authority is 
that of an American court, which treats almost contcmytuously the suggestion that 
the publication of a libel may be enjoined. To the same effect, see § 9 48 (a) of 2 
Story Coram, on Eq. Jurisp. (11th edition). 

No case is cited by the learned counsel for appellant in which the jurisdiction here 
claimed has heen exercised. All that they venture to suggest is, that the various 
English courts which have refused to exercise such a jurisdiction have placed their 
refusal on grounds which do not make such refusal certainly apposite to the circum- 
stances shown bj" this petition. The refusal has been uniform. The reasons assigned 
for it have been various, according to the peculiarities of the cases in which they 
were given. To argue from the qualifications of so many concurring refusals, that it 
may be inferred that, but for the qualifications, the refusals would not have been 
made, would be an exceedingly unsafe line of argument anywhere. In Missouri, 
where we are expressly forbidden by the constitution to assume the power we are 
asked by the plaintiff to exercise, our answer cannot be doubtful. It is hardly neces- 
sary to quote the familiar language of our organic law, whieh has always declared 
" that every person may freely speak, write or print on any subject, being responsi- 
ble for the abuse of that liberty." If it be said that the right to speak, write, or 
print, thus secured to every one, cannot be constructed to mean a license to wantonly 
injure, and that by the jurisdiction claimed it is only suspended until it can be de- 
termined judicially whether the exercise of it in the particular case be allowable, our 
answer is, that wc have no power to suspend that right for a moment or for any pur- 
pose. The sovereign power has forbidden any instrumentality of the government it 
has instituted to limit or restraiu this right except by the fear of the penalty, civil or 
criminal, which may wait on its abuse. The General Assembly can pass no law 
abridging the freedom of speech or of the press; it can only punish the licentious 
abuse of that freedom. Courts of justice can only administer the laws of the State, 
and of course can do nothing by way of judicial sentence which the General Assembly 
has no power to sanction. The matter is too plain for detailed illustration. 
The judgment of the Circuit Court is affirmed. All the judges concurring. 
Note. —See a late case in England, Mackett vs. Commissioners of Heme Bay, 3 
Cent. L. J, 555, 24 W. R. 845, where an injunction was issued restraining the preach- 
ing of a sermon, and the cases there cited Daw vs. Ely, 17 W. R. 245, L. R., 7 Eq. 4S>; 
Tichborne vs. Mostyn, 15 W. R. 1072, L. R , 7 Eq. 55; re Cheltenham and Swansea R. 
R. vs. Wayne Co., 17 W. R 463, L. R. , S Eq. 5S0. 

LATEST PRICES OF IMPORT AND EXPORT ST A. LE-. 



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OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

OCEANIC January 16th, April 17th, July 17th and October 16th. 

BELGIC February 16th, May 16th, August 16th and November 16th. 

GAELIC March 16th, June 16th, September 18th and December 18th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, pplyatthe Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRA DBURY, President. Dec 23. 

FOR ARIZONA AND MEXICAN PORTS. 

For Cape San Lucas, La Paz, fllazatlan, Gnaymas and the 
Colorado River, touching at Magdalena Bay, should sufficient inducement 

offer. —The Steamship NEWBEKN Master, will leave for the above 

ports on TUESDAY, Feb. 10th, at 12 o'clock m., from Folsom-st. Wharf, connect- 
ing at the Mouth of the Colorado River with the Steamboats and Barges of the Colorado 
Steam Navigation Company for all points on the River. Through Bills of Lading 

will be furnished and none others signed. Freight will be received on 

No freight rco-.-ived for Mexican Ports after , at 12, noon, and Bills 

of Lading for those ports must be accompanied by Custom House and Consular Clear- 
ances. SPECIAL Notice: No freight for Mexican Ports will be received on board 
of this Steamer without an order from this office. For freight or passage apply to 
January 20. J. BERM1NGHAM, Agent, 10 Market street. 



.hill. 



1S77. 



CALIFORNIA Al>\ KHTISEH. 



la 



THE DELHI DURBAR. 
The Viceroy of India hifl ii<> i«IU< tiiiK-cf it tin-* Christmas. During 

) native 

II 
Itbg \" lii- rank « *■ attempt 

count would 
only have given ri boartburniu ad would 

li ivc d aqaeness. Tin 

ind well equipped retatnen "t the 
otdefi ind the shabby veblcloe and ragged Following "f the petty hill 
njaha waa very remarkable >»* ii i* U.iN sno Holkar drove op, eaon at- 
tended, u beeame Bdahratta dbJefs, by ■ small but Boldier-nke body of 
l.an«-vrs; m body of EsJrly mounted ouinsBlen escorted the tfaharajsiiat 
Ceahmere; end troopers on cameli preoeded the plain oloee carnage "f 
inn of BbopaL Behind her oame ten or twelve horsemen, and at 
tlu- end of tli-- procession ;i mi arable old man, riding an equally miserable 
pony. Now and then ;i chief came up with troops dressed in what 
d to be cast "if British uniforms; then a body guard clad with chain 
acme* oarried the imagination bach t<> the Middle Ages, only to be speed- 
By racalled t-» the present by the appearance of a motley troop repre- 
senting i. military type, and showing in their equipment that 
mixture of splendor and squalor so characteristic of the East. 

One of the most intsrestnu receptions was that of the Kahn of Khelat 
on Friday Greater Chiels than he have attended the Durbar during the 
we«_*k, but they for the most part are our own feudatories — men who are 
frequently seen at the Viceregal Court. The Kahn comes from beyond 
the border, and had never entered British India before the beginning of 
the present month. The Kahn was quite at his ease, and answered the 
Viceroy's questions without hesitation. He had seen, he said, in British 

India, three things which greatly surprised him— namely, steamboats, 
railways and telegraphs. Lord Lytton replied that he hoped two of them 
might shortly be introduced into His Highness 1 dominion*), and that the 
British Government would be glad to assist the Kahn in establishing 
I henx Then th« Viceroy said a few words by way of exhorting the Kahn 
and Sirdars to live for the future on better terms with one another. They 
had come here peacefully together, and he hoped they were ready to 
forego old feuds and to remain friends. Presents, which comprised guns, 
shawls and a variety of other things, were brought, and His Excellency 
handed to the Kahn n commemorative gold medal as a personal gift from 
the Empress. Then binding a jeweled sword round his visitor's waist, he 
said he trusted it might never be drawn save against the common enemies 
of England and Khelat. The interview then closed, and when the Kahn 
got to the door he found awaiting him another gift in the shape of a mag- 
nificent elephant, Which yreatly pleased him. 

Each chief got a commemorative medal— gold for greater princes, silver 
for those of inferior rank. The Viceroy himself hung it round each 
chief's neck, while the Foreign Secretary made a short speech in Hindus- 
tani, to the effect that this was a personal gift from Her Majesty in honor 
of her assumption of the Imperial title. The medal, which is large and 
handsome, bears on one Bide the Queen's head and on the other the Words 
"Kaiser I. Hind," in Arabic and Sanscrit characters. Each of the 
greater chiefs also received a heavy and beautifvdly worked banner, em- 
blazoned with the arms of his house, and carried on a gilt pole, which. 
bore the inscription, " From Victoria, Empress of India. 1st January, 
1877." Two stalwart Highlanders supported the banner before the 
Throne, and the Viceroy, rising and grasping the pole, addressed to his 
visitor some such words as these : " Whenever this banner is unfurled let 
it remind you of the relations between your Princely House and the 
Paramount Power." As the chiefs left the Vice-Regal presence they 
were again saluted according to their rank and received all the military 
honors which gunpowder ami music could bestow upon them. 

ART JOTTINGS. 

It is understood that the artists are busy preparing for the exhibition 
at the new galleries, to open on the 8th of next month. The room allotted 
to the School of Design is already in order, thanks to the untiring energy 
of that sincere and disinterested friend of the school, Vice-President Mez- 
zara, who has personally superintended the removal of the property of 
the school, and placing it in position in the new quarters, so that when 
Director Williams returns from a two months' visit to his country seat he 
will find eveiy thing arranged for the opening of his school. Now that 
quarters have been procured where the terms of the school cannot conflict 
with the exhibitions of the artists, it might be well to shorten these vaca- 
tions a little, and make the school more remunerative without any addition 
to the expense account; for the rent is, of course, continuous, as is also 
the Director's salary, and it must be admitted that, with reference to the 
latter, §3,000 a year, with four months' vacation, is a little too generous, 
while so many worthy and competent artists are devoting all their time 
to teaching, without earning anything near this salary. 

Thomas Hill has completed a large painting, " Purissima Falls," show- 
ing the spot where the creek of that name empties into the ocean on the 
coast, in San Mateo county. It is a warm sunset scene, with the waves of 
old ocean gently rolling to the beach, where numberless sea fowl are stationed, 
as if resting after a day of wrestling with the sea. The landscape part of the 
picture is but a succession of ban-en rocks, only made attractive by the glow 
of the setting sun. The water is quite as good, if not better, tban that 
found in any marine picture ever painted or brought here. It is exactly 
sea water, pure and simple, in color and action, just as it appears to one 
standing on the beach and looking seaward towards a brilliant sunset. It 
is to be regretted that Mr. Hill's first picture, after his victory at Phila- 
delphia, should have been first a still life, and now a subject necessarily 
forbidding the exercise of his highest talents. They, however, tend to 
show that this artist can make a good showing with any subject. 

Art matters, in common with everything else, are decidedly dull, and 
no revival is looked for until after the art reception above referred to. 



Mr. Isaac Allen is not yet out of his troubles. Miss Rosa Mailhouse, 
•whose name has been prominent of late in connection with the late Sec- 
retary's benevolence, sues him for §25,000 damages. The charges which 
sbe brings against this elderly Don Juan are not of a character to allude 
to in our columns, hut one of the offenses charged is of a nature to insure 
him a long residence over the bay if proven. What use is it to buy 
pianos for young ladies and help them in distress if they return good for 
evil by immediately bringing suits of this nature? This last blow is 
enough to close Mr. Allen's heart to all charitable appeals forever. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOK WEEK ENDING JAN. 20, 1877. 





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16 


A.M. 
IS 

li 

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A.M. 

20$ 

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191 

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71 

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A.M. 
101 

1« 

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168 


r. m. 




23 

9 

■J 




Atlantic • 



Alpine 

■• ■ i m 



r.. .i .v Belcher . 


Boston 

Benton. 

•Crown Point... 

Chollar 

Con Virginia 

Caledonia 

Cosmopolitan- .. 
Cone Imperial . .. 
Coso * Ion.. 

Con. Comstock . . 


li 
73 

IV 
461 

ll 


Dardanelles. . . . 

East Justice 


22 


Gould & Curry . . 
Great Eastern . . . 


i 
li 

i 


Golden Chariot .. 
General Thomas. 

Grand Prize 

G. E. Gravel .... 
Hale& Norcross. 




16 




Jenny Glynn 

Knickerbocker . . 

K. K. Cons 

Lady Bryan 

Lady Wash'n 


4 

14 

1 
34 

li 

21 
li 




43 


Mexican 

Monumental 


Manhattan 

Meteor 

Mclones 

Martha & Bessie. 

New Coso 

Northern Belle . . 
N. Con. Virginia. 
Nevada 

Niagara 

N. Monumental., 
N. Carson 


'51 
12i 

3 

44 

27 

i 

8 

2Si 

~i 

9 


Occidental 

Og. Comstock . . . 
Oregon. 

Poorman 

Phil Sheridan . . . 

Panther 

Raymond & Ely. 

Rock Island 


Sierra Nevada. .. 
Silver Hill 
Syndicate 

Superior 

Shasta 

Southern Star... 
Succor 

Soutli Chariot . . . 

S. V. Water 

S. Modoc 

Twin Peaks 

Utah 

Union Flag 

Washoe 

Woodville 

Wells Fargo 

Ward 

WestComstock .. 
Yellow Jacket. . . 


8} 
74 

1£ 
_3 

16 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Mining Com- 
pany will be held next Tuesday. The transfer books were closed yesterday. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jan. 27, 1877. 



COURT CHAT, 

And the Upper Ten Thousand at Home and Abroad. 

The Empress of Brazil has presented the Queen of England with a 
dress the equal of which has never been seen. It is woven of spiders' 
.vebs, and is, as may be imagined, & work of art as regards quality and 
beauty. The handsome silk dress cannot compare with it ; but it can 
only be admired, hardly imitated. There have already been many at- 
tempts to make use of the threads spun by spiders, but up to the present 
the experiments have not been satisfactory enough to encourage any fur- 
ther efforts in this direction. In the year 1710 it was discovered that to 
make a piece of silk it would require the webs of 700,000 spiders. The 
Spaniards had already tried to use the spiders' threads and made gloves, 
stockings, and other articles of the sort ; but even these were so trouble- 
some and yielded so little profit that, in spite of the fabulous prices paid, 
they were obliged to abandon the trade. In certain parts of South 
America garments made of these threads are worn ; but the spiders in 
these lands are unusually large. It is likely that the above-mentioned 
dress was made of the smaller species of the American spider. There is, 
therefore, some hope that the time is not far distant when, thanks to the 
progress of modern industry, fashionable ladies may have the satisfaction 
of wearing elegant silks of the same delicate texture. — Court Journal. 

The Empress Eugenie continues to enjoy her sojourn in Florence. 
Victor Emanuel and she have exchanged visits. She receives every day 
at five o'clock in the Turkish room of the Villa Openheim, and thither 
flock all the great Italian dames and the most distinguished of the for- 
eign residents ; there is tea for those who like it, and a charming hour for 
all. The conversation is always gay and animated about the chair of the 
Empress, and she speaks of the public matters of the day with fine acu- 
men and without any trace of bitterness; the old grace and seduisance so 
celebrated at the Tuileries have lost nothing of their infinite fascination. 
When will the brilliancy of France ever again be represented by two 
such women as the one whom France did to death in the eighteenth cen- 
tury and the one whom she drove into exile in the nineteenth ? 

The Marquis of Salisbury's pace is too fast for the Marchioness. 
These frequent long journeys have wearied her much, and she has bad to 
rest at Florence, than which there could hardly be a resting-place more 

fileasant. The Marchioness, it will be remembered, is a daughter of the 
ate Mr. Baron Alderson. She is a woman of great ability, and when 
her husband was only Lord Robert Cecil, and glad to eke out a very 
scanty younger son's portion by the pen, she aided her husband in the 
same way, and was for some years a frequent and caustic contributor to 
the Saturday Review. She has now became a prominent leader in the 
great world, and will be more influential than ever after her return from 
Constantinople. — Court Journal. 

One of the fashionable lions of the present month is the Esquimaux 
Chief, Olnik, who has for some days past resided in Thavies-inn, Holborn. 
On Tuesday week he dined with the Prince of Wales at Captain Allan 
Young's, and on Sunday he was to be seen at the Zoological Gardens. He 
took a vast interest in the Polar bears as old acquaintances, but the surly 
animals did not take much notice of his squat figure ; in fact, the mon- 
keys seemed far more anxious to recognize him as a "man and a brother." 

The Empress of Austria takes a keen interest in English literature 
and its "working staff." It is not so many years ago that she might 
have been seen daily walking and chatting by the side of a young English- 
man, a poet and an invalid, who used to be wheeled about the public 
gardens in Kissengen in a Bath chair. The Empress has recently sent to 
Isabel Burton, a handsome gold locket, with her monogram and an impe- 
rial crown in diamonds as a mark of her appreciation of that lady's book 
on The Inner Life of Syria. 

Victoria Melita is the pretty name that has been chosen for the in- 
fant daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Edinburgh; and her Majesty 
must have given a sigh of relief at the intelligence that there were only 
two additional denominatives to remember in the enlarging circle of royal 
grandchildren, whose names alone previously numbered over a hundred. 

The Duke of Westminster, who is president of the Metropolitan 
Drinking Fountains Assoiation, will hear with a feeling of envy that a 
certain refiner, M. Leguay by name, has died and left by will £20,000 for 
supplying Paris with fountains. Happily the duke can do better than 
the refiner — he can give £20,000 for drinking fountains in London without 
dying. 

One of the most artistic and valuable presents made to Lady Muriel 
Talbot, was a dessert service for eighteen persons, specially manufactured 
by Minton. Each plate was painted with a well-executed sketch of the 
several mansions and ancestral halls of the two families. 

A letter from Constantinople states that Lady Salisbury often goes 
out for a drive with Mdme. Ignatieff, and Lorn Salisbury is constantly to 
be seen strolling arm-in-arm with General Ignatieff along the Grande 
Hue de Pera. — Court Journal. 

The Duchess GaUiera has presented an addition of a million to the 
Pope. A distinguished body of collectors of Peter's Pence in Borne of- 
ferred a large sum to His Holiness on the festival of the Immaculate 
Conception of the Virgin. 

A Curious Coincidence— The Prime Ministers of England and 
France are both Jews, and both were born on the same day of the month, 
the last day of the year; but Benjamin Disraeli was born nine years be- 
fore Jules Simon. 

At a dinner given in Turin to Herr von Flotow, the composer of 
Martha, he proposed the following toast: *' I drink to Italy, which will 
always be the native land of melody, and, perhaps, its refuge!" 

Lord Charles Beresford contributed a very characteristic present on 
the occasion of Viscount Helmsley'e marriage to Lady Muriel Talbot — 
six silver salt-cellars, each of which was a tiny cradle. 

The talk is that the Marquis of Salisbury will, if he returns success- 
ful, be made a duke, and succeed Lord Beaconsfield as Premier. 

M'lk as Food. —There is said to be an old gentleman in England who 
has found the true elixir of life to be the food of infancy. He always 
has five wet nurses "on tap," and grows "fat and well liking " as he 
verges on centenarianism. 



JV1EDICAL DIRECTORY. 



DE. HUNTER'S PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS. 

Toronto School of Medicine, Toronto, July 14th, lS6S.-«- 
I certify that the bearer, Dr. James A. Hunter, attended lectures at this insti- 
tution for two sessions, viz. , 18G1-02 and 1868-04, and obtained license to practice from 
the Medical Board for Upper Canada. (Signed) H. II. WRIGHT, M.D., 

Secretary Toronto School of Medicine. 
Dr. Hu nter's Office is at '22-2 Post street. September 16. 

TEETH SAVED! 

Filling Teeth a Specialty. —Great patience extended to 
children. Chloroform administered, and teeth skillfully extracted. After ten 
years constant practice, I can guarantee satisfaction. Prices "moderate. Office— 120 
Sutter street, above Montgomery. ]June 6.] DR. MORFFEW, Dentist. 

DR. J. H. STALIARD, 

Member or the Royal College of Physicians, London, etc., 
author of " Female Hygiene on the Pacific Coast." 37 Post street. Office 
Hours, 12 to 3 and 7 to 8 p.m. Nov. 4. 

ARTIFICIAL TEETH. 

Beautiful celluloid plates made by JD>r. Jessnp, corner 
Sutter and Montgomery streets, at $20 a set, are for superior to vulcanite rub- 
ber, and the color of the natural gum. Feb. 20. 

STEELE'S SQUIRREL POISON. 
[Patented October Wth, 1875.] 

Sure death to Squirrels, Bats, Gophers, etc. For sale by all 
Druggists, Grocers and General Dealers. Price, $1 per box. Made by JAMES 
G. STEELE & CO., San Fraucisco, Cal. Liberal discount to the Trade. Aug. 21. 

PHYSICIAN, SURGEON AND ACCOUCHEUR, 

J. J. ATJERBACH, M.D., 

March 13. 310* Stockton street, San Francisco. 

0. P. WARREN, M.D. 
clectic Physician, corner of Fourteenth and Broadway, 



E 



N. MILLER, M.D., 

Physician, Oakland. Oflice, 1004 Broadway ; Residence, 364 
Eighth street. October 2. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

D. F. Hutchinos. D. M. Dunxe. J. Sakderson. 

PHC3NIX OIL "WORKS. 

Establishetl 1850.— Hutchings A- Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. S. 

J. G. MERRILL & CO. 

Wholesale Auction House, 204 and 306 California street. 
Sale days, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10 a.m. Cash advances on consign, 
ments. Dec. 14. 

CHARLES LE WAY, 
American Commission merchant, - - I Rue Scribe, Paris. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS. 



Newtos Booth, C. T. Wheeler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W. W. Dodge, S. F 
W. W. DOD&E & CO., 

Wholesale Grocers, corner Front and Clay streets, San 
Francisco. A pril 1. 

REMOVAL. 

L. H. Newton.] NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., [Morris Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, have removed to 204 and 20U California street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. June 7. 



s 



TABER, HARKER & CO., 
uccessors to Phillips, Taber A Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, 108 and 110 California street, below Front, San Francisco. April 15. 



A- S. ROSENBATJM & CO., 

Southeast corner of California and Battery streets, invite 
the attention of their customers and others to their large assortment of the 
Best and Finest Brands of CHEWING and SMOKING TOBACCO, HAVANA CIGARS 
and CIGAR1TOS. Consignments of Choicest Brands of Cigars received bv every 
Steamer. [Oct. 18 ] A. S. ROSENBAUM it CO. 

•\ K&- PRINTS *^a 

[■637 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

) BELOW MONTGOMERY. 



BRUCE, 



BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRlE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

Sax Francisco. [May 24. 

CASTLE BROTHERS.— [Established, 1850.] 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Nos.313 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

PERSONS VISITING THE EAST 

Will find full files of Pacific Coast papers and conve- 
niences for letter writing, etc., at Wells, Fargo & Co. 's Office, 65 Broadway, 
New York. March 25. 

REMOVAL. 

Sutro A Co. have removed to No. 408 Montgomery street, 
opposite. Jan. 6. 



.Inn. 8ft, 1877. 



CALIFORNIA Al>\ EKTISER. 



15 



SPECIAL BREVITIES. 



On i*. : 'i fifty 

I y, :»inl 

'.■-. |ii..\ i.lcl wai ,* donki 

for th« patient, but stubborn molf mum- 

. qr thttir spui 

• I r»i. i of tl..' day. Tiit' flu wu l<»v^ oi 

iy, and the laughter wan loud and long 
ut ill- figure out l>> tome oi the compeUton. At tut one asa, evidently 
away from the rat 1 to be winning, 

d iwn, in ■*■ oanl I ering wai tremendous; the betting wiw 

Bvea t.. ona and do taken. He nenred the winning-post a distance "f at 
him from the second moke. Bis rider, secure 
be thought, determined to do the last two yards in style. 
He applied the ipurs! siss, with dire effect, for the brute put his head 
down, Itfoked furious] sd short, and would not budge an inch! 

N..t i\ moment was t-> be lost! Those wn i were running second and third 
aan their comrades difficulty, and redoubled their efforts. Slowly but 
surely they rum.- aloo them to the goal! The ex- 

citement was intense] At last the rider oi donkey number one came to 
the conclusion that some action oughl to be taken and that at once. 

Should he let the prize *li|> from his hands, when it seemed almost within 
n He Sprang to the ground without a moments hesitation, and. 
il, put it over his shoulder, and draped the unwill- 
ing animal backward past the post! Time by Benton a chronometer, 
outers of an hour. An objection was Lodged, but the decision 
n in favor of the winner. 

The Elephants at the Zoological Gardens. —A very singular ac- 
cident occurred) recently, at the Zoological Gardens, London. The 

smaller African elephant, Alice, which, some few monthfi ago had its truuk 
unfortunately torn off, was turned out into the elephant-yard while her 
being m ept out. In the large yard in question some new pipes 
had been laid down to supply the pond with water. The workmen had 
not filled in the excavation with sufficient firmness, and, Alice treading 
with her right fore-leg on the soft ground, it gave way below her. and she 
was immediately buried up to the shoulder. Her present keepers came to 
her assistance] but the animal was in a state of great fury and excitement, 
and the only person that dared £0 near her was Scott, her old keeper, 
and formerly joint-keeper of the elephant-house with Andrew Thompson. 
Pulleys and hoisting tackle were brought to the spot, and planks inserted 
under Alice's jaw. The pulleys were brought to work on these planks, 
her head was lifted, and then beams were placed under her chest. Fi- 
nally, after an hour's hard work, partly by digging away the ground 
around her, and partly by bringing the pulleys to bear, she was rescued. 

The Largest Roasting Jack in England. —Messrs. Feetham, of 
Snip, square, are at present engaged in fitting up a jack for the kitchen 
of the residence of the Duke of Westminster, known as Eaton Hall. It 
is 22 feet in length. The motive power is water, which is conveyed from 
the cistern to the water-wheel by a /inch pipe. The wheel is 4 feet in 
diameter and 5 inches in breadth, and it sets in motion six horizontal and 
four vertical spits. Over the wheels which communicate motion to the 
spite are five oil-boxes. The jack is capable of cooking about a ton of 
meat. It is entirely under the control of the cook, who can regulate its 
speed by simply turning a water-tap. The wheel will not be hidden from 
view, and will be enclosed in a glass case, and surmounted by an arch in 
ornamental brickwork. 

A correspondent, writing from Shoumla on December 1st., states 
that on November 5th the Bishop of the Catholic Seminary of Zytoraierz, 
in Poland, Mgr. Kruzynski, was suddenly banished to Simbirska, without 
any previous notice or trial, for refusing to give his consent to the ex- 
tinction of the Polish language in the said institute. After this act was 
committed, the Russian Government sought to enforce the use of the 
Russian language in the ecclesiastical seminary, and when the chapter 
refused to comply, the institute was surrounded at night by the gend- 
armes, and all the seminarists were the same night forcibly transported 
to Wilno. 

A Horse's Food. — The following are the quantities given out in the 
stables of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company: 771bs. of hay 
and 114lhs. of grain per horse per week; or lllhs. of hay and 161bs. of 
grain per horse per day. The following are the quantities given out at 
the stables of Messrs. Thompson & Kay, carriers, Manchester: 75lbs. of 
hay and straw, and 1331bs. of grain per horse weekly ; or lOlbs. of hay 
and straw, and lGlbs. of grain per horse daily. The following are the 
quantities given out in the stables of the Scavenging Department at 
Manchester: lOOlbs. of bay and 1401bs. of grain per horse per week ; or 
141bs. of hay and 201 bs of grain per horse daily. They are all powerful 
dray horses. 

The Sporting Gazette states that there is a likelihood of another Po- 
lish expedition being fitted out next summer. It is to be a private under- 
taking, set on foot by the united yacht clubs of the kingdom. Each 
yacht club has guaranteed a subscription, and the scheme has advanced 
so far that the distinguished geographer, Dr. Petermann, is now hi Lon- 
don for the purpose of consulting with the promoters of the expedition on 
the best route to be adopted. 

It is understood that at the election of Governors of the Bank of 
England to be held in April next, Mr. Edward Howley Palmer, the pres- 
ent Deputy-Governor, will be proposed as Governor, and Mr. John Wil- 
liam Birch, of the firm of Mildred, Goyeneche, & Co., for many years a 
director of the Bank, as Deputy-Governor. 

The "Academy" understands that the first volume of Mr. Her- 
bert Spencer's " Principles of Sociology" is completed, and may be looked 
for before long. It will form the sixth volume of the Synthetic 
Philosophy. 

A saying prevails in Turkey that it takes two Turks to swindle a 
Greek, two Greeks to swindle a Jew, and two Jews to swindle an Ameri- 
can. 

A new tax of fifteen piastres for every male between five and sixty 
years of age has been decreed in Turkey. 

The religious newspapers are discussing the propriety of using ale 
in the Communion service when wine cannot be had. 



WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 



CUTlfcK WHI&KV. 

AP. HotedJnsr 4 <<►.. No. ut Jnckmn jrtrees, are the sole 
• \ I il I i i I i i: mii i. . 

i from Lou ■.■... , tie pur- 

n brand* oi "J H, < uttei Old Bourl " Owing i« 

■ 
ipadoa 1 1 i~ real!) tfao Bant Wtnssv in thi Ui States, Maron D 



A. M 

Importer nmi Wholesale 
li Pino 
' Old Port and Sh< 
Celebrated CACHET Hi. AM' 

hi i ri ks. 



OILMAN, 
itcjaos 1 Dealer, son California 

bon ' 1 1- 1 R] a W i:i-i. ir i, Brsndli -, i inf 
. StUl and Sparkling Wtnt ant for the 

(.iiAMi'Ai.Ni; Bole agent tor mills' STOMACH 

Bforofa i 



i.i Uou 



KOHLER & FROHLING, 

Grower* Of and I>enler* In California Wines anil Bra inly, 
offer to the public their large itock oi ■ ■ I « i. and absolutely pure Wines end 
Brandies, In lots to suit, 6S6 Montgomery street, and southeast corner Sutler and 

iMipnut Mr.. els, Slui l-'runeihiro. October -1. 

J. H. CUTTER OLD BOURBON. 

(1 P. Moorman A Co., Manufacturer*, Louisville. Ky.— 
j% The above well-known House 1 ia represented here by the undersigned, who 

li;m' I- 'ii !i|i|tniiiU:il tliur Suk- Au't-nts fur 1 1 1 1_- I'sicilic (JoSSt 
July 3. A. P. HOTALINO & CO.. 42B and 431 Jackson street. S. F. 

ROEDEREB CHAMPAGNE. 

Cia r ( i' Blanche, the Celebrated Iiraiiri of Mr. Louis Koederer, 
J of Reims, in bund or duty paid, quarts ur pints, for sale to the trade in lotn to 
Mm, bj MACONDRAY & Co., 

Sept. 23. Sole Agents for the Paeilic Coast. 

J. H. CUTTER'S OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKY, 
HiiuTactured l>y Milton J. Hardy A Co., Noiis-iii-Xaw and 



M 



Successors of J. H. CUTTER, Louisville, Ky. li. MARTIN lV. CO., 

Aujrust 14. No. 40S Front street, Sole Agents (or the Pacific Coast 

Samples Free. 

P O. VIUKERY, Augusta, Maine. 



& ?.?*tll l T , y a Week loAsmis, 
MPtJtfHsPf 4 October 21. 



BROKERS. 



Thomas Gahdixek, 
Late of the Sacramento "Union." 



R. 0. Hooker, 
Member S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. 

GARDINER & HOOKER. 

(1«»m mission StoeK Rrolicrs. 336 Pine street, north side, one 
J door below Montgomery, San Francisco, Cal. Buy and eell only on commission. 
Liberal advances made on active accounts, I>ec, 23. 

JOHN PERRY. JR., 

Member of the San Francisco Board of Brokers, has removed 
his Office to 824 CALIFORNIA STREET, under Wells, Fargo &Co's Bank. Es- 
pecial attention paid to the purchase and sale of Water and Gas Stock ; also, City and 

County and L'nitcd States Bonds, and other local securities. Sep t. 9. 

REMOVAL ! 

JW. Brown A Co., Stock and Money Brokers, have re- 
• moved to No. 317 Montgomery street. Nevada Block, 
J. W. Brown, Member S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. Jan 8. 

J. K. S. Latham.] LATHAM & KING, [Homer S. King. 

Successors to James II. Latham A Co., Stock and Money 
Brokers, 411 California street, San Francisco. Member S. F. Stock and Exchange 
Board. Money loaned on Stocks. Stocks bought and carried on margins. Aug. 12. 

HUBBARD & CO., 

(Commission Stock Brokers, 324 1-2 Montgomery street, mi- 
j dcr Safe Deposit building, San Francisco, will transact business through the 
San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board. July 17. 

E. P. PECKHAM, 
Commission Stock Broker and Member S. F. Stock Ex- 

J change, 413 California street. Stocks bought, sold and carried. Liberal ad- 
vances made on active accounts. Orders receive prompt execution and return. 

[June. 19. ] 

D. M. Hosmer.] HOSMER & BOURNE, IJB.Bolr.se. 

Stock Brokers, 116 Halleck street, San Francisco. Post- 
office Address, Lock Box 1837. March 25. 







M- 



LIBERAL ADVANCES 
arte on active stock accounts by Callagban, Lynch &. Co., 

llXi Loidesdorff street, June 17- 

REMOVAL. 

Lovelauil, David * Co., from 108 Leltlesdorn" street to JTo. 
421 California street, corner Leidesdorff. Feb. 2<i, 

TO OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE! 

Persons Owning Real Estate that has heretofore been as- 
sessed in the former owner's name, are requested to appear personally, or send 
their deeds to the Assessor's Office, 644 Merchant street, City Hall, immediately, and 
have the proper changes made for next year's Roll. The work on the Real Kstate 
Roll for 1S77 will .'eminence in a few days, after which it will he too late for any 
chances. ALEXANDER BADLAM, 

j an . 13. City and County Assessor. 

VEHICLE LICENSES. 

License Collector's Office, Boom No. 7, City Hall, San Fran- 
cisco, January 4. 1877. Licenses on Vehicles are now due and payable at this 
office. Will he delinquent on February 1st next, when a penalty will be added. Pro- 
duce Peddlers' and all business licenses for the current quarter are also due. 
j on . 13. R. H. SIMON, License C ollector. 



SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY, OF S4N FRANCISCO, 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and California Sts. 

CAPITAL . S3.000.000. 

This Company is now open for thcrentingof vaults ami the 
transaction of all business connected with a Safe Depository. Pamphlets jjii me 
full information and rates can be obtained at the office of the Company. Hours, 
from 8a.m. to li r..M. September 18. 

G. G. GARIBALDI. 
Fresco and Decoration, Nevada Block, No.'s 73 and 74. 

[January 13.] 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEft. 



Jan. 27, 1877. 




•'THE MISSING LINK." 

The Tailed Islanders of Kalili — Darwin Trlum] 

It is with no ordinary sense of the responsibility which r« 
shoulders that the NeiVs Letter undertakes this week to presl 
readers the well authenticated and fully verified statements of] 
George Brown, of the Wesley an Missionary Society, who h' 
turned from his field of labor in the New Britain and New Ireland group 
of islands on the east coast of New Guinea. The London TiittA, with its 
usual caution, refrains from commenting on the facts as related by its 
correspondent, but the Daily Ttleyrapk of the 28th ult., tjie Bristol 
Times, and other prominent European journals do not hesitate to discuss 
the matter fully and freely. The facts, assent to the London Times, are 
verbatim as follows : 

" The natives in Blanche Bay affirm most positively the existence of a 
race of men with tails at a place called Kahii. They deny most indig- 
nantly the supposition that they must be monkeys, asking if monkeys 
fight with spears, plant yams, make houses, etc. They say that the ap- 
pendage is hard and inflexible, bo much so that they have to dig a hole in 
the sand before they can sit down, as they die at once if the tail is broken. 
They also say that any child born without this appendage is destroyed, 
for fear it should be ridiculed when it grows up." 

Blanche Bay is in the New Ireland group and may be readily found 
marked in any modern atlas. The presentation of such a statement un- 
confirmed would be of little use to the readers of the News Letter, and we 
should not have noticed the occurrence were we not happily in a position 
to more than verify the alleged existence of this race, and go still further 
by presenting our readers with a picture of a Kalilian Islander, which, 
together with the statements of Mr. Uruoco, have been made the sub- 
jects of affidavits before a notary public of this city. Before proceeding 
to the details of the narrative regarding these islanders it will interest 
our readers to know where they live. The northern point of Australia is 
Cape York, which is situated eleven degrees south of the Equator. Torres 
Straits divides the continent of Australia from Papua, or New Guinea, 
to the east of which lies the group of islands known as New Britain, New 
Ireland and the Salomon Islands. Dampier Straits separate the main- 
land of New Guinea from the islands of New Britain, immediately to the 
east of which is the New Ireland group. Blanche Bay is the chief harbor 
of the last named isles, and Kalili is the principal settlement in the hills, 
situated about twelve miles from the sea coast. Kalila is in the northern 
portion of the island and about three degrees south of the Equator. 

Now let us hear what Mr. Brown, the Sydney missionary, has to say 
about the islands, after which we will append the statements of Don Jose 
Uruoco, an old resident of California, and proprietor of an extensive sil- 
ver mine near Cerro Gordo, Inyo county, California, to whom all- further 
inquiries may be addressed by the curious or the skeptical among our 
readers. The London Daily Telegraph, in an editorial, alludes to the 
strange story as follows: 

" The Rev. George Brown, a Wesleyan, has lately returned to Sydney, 
after staying about a year in the New Britain and New Ireland group of 
islands, on the east coast of New Guinea, and has brought back with him 
some most extraordinary stories. Instead of being eaten, Mr. Brown 
had a very good time of it. The islanders, so far from knocking him on 
the head and afterwards "utilizing" him, have let him alone, possibly 
from a tradition current amongst cannibals in the South Seas that white 
men taste abominably salt, which fancy probably arises from the fact 
that they usually get hold of well-pickled, salt-junk-eating sailors. 
Amongst the South Sea islanders, morality, in the more technical and 
limited acceptation of the term, is an altogether unknown virtue. The 
consequence is that in most of the islands the leading chiefs taboo their 
daughters until they are married— that is to say, they confine them in an 
inclosure surrounded with a taboo fence, and any sacrilegious male who 
may enter those precincts is immediately speared. Mr. Brown, however, 
having won the confidence of the natives, was allowed, as a tribute to his 
priestly character, to pass the portals of one of these mysterious bounda- 
ries. Within the outer fence he found, he telle us, ' three conical -shaped 
structures made of pandanus leaves sown together, and about four feet in 
circumference at the bottom, that circumference being maintained for 
about four feet upwards. From that point the structures tapered off to a 
sharp point at the top. Each place was closed by a double door of plaited 
cocoanut and pandanus leaves. In each of these structures, and raised 
about three feet from the ground, was a young girl, their ages apparently 
being eight, ten and fourteen years respectively.' In these cages, he tells 
us, the girls are kept until they are married, and during the whole of 
that period their feet are not once allowed to touch the ground. So 
strictly, indeed, is this rule observed, that when the little princesses take 
their limited walks abroad, or leave their huts for the purpose of ablu- 
tion, a carpet of bamboos is laid down for them to tread upon. Extraor- 
dinary as this story is, it yet falls far short of what Mr. Brown has to 
tell us about the natives of Blanche Bay, in the New Ireland group. 
He was here most positively assured that up in the hills, at a place called 
Kalili, is to be fouud a race of men with tails. The appendage in ques- 
tion is, they told him, hard and inflexible — so hard, indeed, that before 
the wearer dares to sit down he has to dig a hole in the sand, for if by 
any accident the tail is broken, death immediately ensues. Mr. Brown 
inclines to the opinion that the natives »of Blanche Bay were telling him 
the truth, for they kindly volunteered to go up into the hills and spear an 
adult specimen for him — an offer which he firmly declined, on the ground 
that it was contrary to his religious principles to allow human life to be 
thus needlessly taken. It seems, according to Mr. Brown's information, 
that these tailed men are adroit handlers of the spear and war club, that 
they run with astonishing rapidity, that they are devil worshipers, and 
that they are so profoundly cannibal in their tastes as to prefer ' long pig' 
to any other form of diet." 

Here Mr. Brown's story rests, and our Californian informant, with his 
sketch-book and affidavits, comes to the front. The following is the 
sworn testimony of Don Jose Uruoco, divested of the usual legal pream- 
ble: "My name is Jose Uruoco. I am 51 years of^age, a native of Anda- 
lusia, and now engaged in silver mining. My claim is known as the 
Buena Sera, and is situate 37 miles east of the Cerro Gordo mines. In 
1857 I was miuing in South Australia, and in '58 I was at Ballaarat, 
Bendigo and the Victoria diggings. Meeting with no success I shipped 
as clerk on board of the trader Ann Courtenay, bound for Papua. The 
Dutch Scientific Commission were on the West Coast at the time I was 
there. I picked up considerable of the Papuan language during a three 
mouth's stay at. Dorey, in the northwest part of New Guinea. The lan- 



guage I learnt is the Mafoor dialect, which is spoken by the Papuans of 
Mansinam, onJRohn Island. We traded our cargo for skins of Birds of 
Paradise, tortoise shell, wild nutmegs, and tripang. There are more 
brilliantly plumaged birds there than anywhere else in the world that I 
have seen, and after making a successful trip we returned to Port Jack- 
son in January, '59, to discharge cargo and reload for the coast of New 
Guinea. In this way I made three trips, and became thoroughly con- 
versant with the habits and customs of the natives. On my fourth voy- 
age, in 1862, a strong gale from the west drove us out of our course, and 
we sighted the Salomon Islands, two miles to the east on the morning of 
the 3d of May, of that year. I have read the accounts given by the Rev. 
Geo. Brown of the inhabitants of Kalili. The account, though incom- 
plete, is correct as far as it goes, with one exception. THe Kalilian,s are not 
cannil.als, nor are they hostile to the coast tribes or the natives of other 
islands. The spine contains 8, 9 and 10 lumbar vertebra?, instead of 5, 
which is the full complement, of an ordinary spine. It cannot well b*e 
called a tail, because it is incapable of motion and extremely tender to 
the touch. The vertebrae do not diminish in stee, bnt on the contrary are, 
if anything, larger toward the last. On the occasion of my fourth Voy- 
age, above alluded to, we put into Blanche Bay for water and some slight 
repairs. The inland settlement alluded to as Kalili is noted in my diary 
as Manasvari-Kali; but the error probably exists with me. On the second 
day of our stay at Blanche Bay numbers of the natives swam out to the 
ship. I was first attracted by the peculiar appearance of these vertebras 
in the water. Those who came on board remained standing, or else 
crouched on their knees. In no instance was my curiosity satisfied by 
seeing them attempt to sit down, and I heard the same story about their 
digging holes in the ground, which Mr. Brown relates. The animals on 
the island were all marsupial except the Papuan dog, which has been 
taken there, and the hog, winch one finds on all these islands. The Kali- 
lians use a blow gun, with which they are very skillful, and they kUlnumbers 
of birds with this weapon without injuring their plumage. This renders 
them more valuable in the eyes of the traders. The sketches which I 
made of the natives are faithful, as far aa my skill permits. With regard 
to the continuation of their spines I am very well satisfied with the 
drawing of the Kalilian boy which you offer to your readers this week. 
The tail is as I sketched it, though afterwards I saw many full three 
inches longer. My only objection is to the face. The lithographer has 
not made the lips thick enough." 

Our picture this week is a humorous though true sketch of a Kalilian 
boy holding converse with two apes, and explaining to them what in 
sober earnest is the real truth— that his tribe are truly the connecting 
link between the tadpole, the quadrum anous arboreal mammal and the 
bipes implumis, known as man. 

A small but accurate diagram of the islands is appended to the picture 
of the Kililian Boy, and will serve to enlighten our readers as to the ex- 
act position of the New Ireland group. This was deemed advisable, al- 
though the description already given of the locality above should be suffi- 
cient to explain the position to all careful readers. 

A BIT OF DIPLOMACY. 
Diplomacy is a curious science. It is true of it that it often finds 
the longest way round to be the shortest way home. That little dispute 
between Hamilton Fish and Lord Derby about the extradition treaty will 
be remembered by all. Derby claimed that a local act of Parliament, 
recently passed, forbade ministers to give up a prisoner except upon an 
undertaking that he would not be tried for an offense other than the one 
for which he was extradited. Mr. Fish, in a most able paper, contro- 
verted Derby's position, and made his best point upon the argument that 
no act of Parliament, or of Congress, could vitiate a treaty solemnly 
entered into between two nations. The Ashburton treaty called for no 
such assurances as to what should or should not be done with a prisoner, 
and therefore Mr. Fish, in high dudgeon, refused to give any. For a time 
Derby was equally persistent, and as a consequence Winelow and others 
were released, and President Grant announced that he would neither 
receive nor make requisitions for offenders. Suddenly Derby backed 
down, and confessed that whilst he had no doubt whatever of the right- 
eousness of the English act of Parliament passed with the intent to pre- 
vent a man from beiug extradited for one offense and tried for another, 
yet with the very sublimity of submission he confessed himself converted 
by Mr. Fish's argument that a treaty could not be set aside by acts of 
Parliament or of Congress, and that the proper course was to negotiate a 
new treaty. Meanwhile he agreed to continue the old one as if nothing 
had happened, and Mr. Fish, delighted with his evident triumph, con- 
sented to enter upon the consideration of a new one embodying the prin- 
ciple contended for by Derby, which is admitted on all hands to be a just 
one. Thus the whole thing ended lovely. Our Secretary had beaten 
England's Foreign Minister in a- fair argument. The American eagle was 
prouder than ever, and the good feeling between the two nations was pro- 
moted by our vanity being soothed. Now comes a fact that illustrates 
how diplomacy often finds the longest way round the nearest way home. 
Just prior to Derby's sudden change, Congress had accepted the Hawaiian 
treaty. That document has an effect which we pointed out at the time, 
but which our politicians do not seem to fully realize even yet. The 
shrewd representatives of the nation of "shopkeepers" saw it directly. 
The United States are solemnly pledged by treaty to admit British goods 
upon equal terms with the most favored nation. Hence, as the Hawaiians 
have sugar and a long line of other articles on the free list, it necessarily 
follows that under her treaty England is entitled to like privileges. It 
might have been claimed that the act of Congress in ratifying the 
Hawaiian treaty virtually set aside the English one. But the able argu- 
ment of Mr. Irish, and the complete submission of Derby, takes that 
ground from under our feet. And now we find that English producers 
are in real earnest in their intention to avail themselves of their treaty 
rights. The European Mail of the 22d of December points out to its 
British colonial readers what their rights are in the premises, and promises 
to follow the subject up. The case is put with such clearness that it 
would seem impossible to resist its conclusions. We wonder if Lord 
Derby saw all this when he was submitting to a principle that in the end 
was to prove so greatly to the advantage of his country ? Whether lie saw 
it or not,* the effect is the same. 

Judge Wheeler's bad law, upset by a high Court of Appeals, as re- 
ported in another column, will not furnish him with pleasant reading this 
morning. Upholding, as it does most nobly, the liberty of the press, it 
is worthy the notice of our contemporaries everywhere. 






M$kr 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 





Offloe-607 to 01-"> Merchant Strot'l. 



VOLUME £7. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 27, 1817- 



NUMBER 1. 



BIZ. 



Imports during January have been quite light, while the exports 

have i «»_-*' i i well kept up by shipments of Wheat, Flour, Quicksilver, etc. 

'I'll.- genial weather thua Far during the month has been productive of 

much good in bringing forward grass and grain rapidly, and giving hope 

■. to the perishing sheep and cattle; while the 

ts have 'if l:iU' iitrn greatly improved by the rainfall of an 

men with which we were visited last week. Our interior exchanges speak 

\ aa to the good effects of the rain, enabling the farmer to 

ttivate Ins land to good advantage, while the warm, growing 

: ■ i few days has painted the hills and valleys with living 

Oui merchants and ship-owners begin to look with more confi- 

as to the future, hoping that 1877 will give us full average crops, 

ami thus give freight to the large fleet of ships that may reasonably come 

bis Summer and Fall seeking business. At this writing tonnage is 

a] and freights low, several ships having been chartered during the 
week to load Wheat for Liverpool at £2. Some ship-owners are now 

j for a alight advance in Wheat freights, and it is possible that 
rement may be realized therefor in the month of February, 
as v. have remaining about 150,000 tons of Wheat yet to be exported. 

Last week we presented some valuable statistical figures concerning 
the business of this coast, taken from the Commercial BeraU£s Annual 
Review. We now purpose to allude to its well filled columns once more, 

therefrom some Lumber statistics which will be found valuable to 
our readers. 

Our Lumber exports in 187."> aggregated 10,000,000 feet, valued at 
n. The same in 1876 reached 10,800,000 feet, valued at 8200,000. 
Our receipts of Lumber seem to have been immense, showing how vast 
the local consumption has become within the past few years. Of Pine 
the receipts fur 1876 aggregated 161,300,000 feet ; of Redwood, 115,000,000 
feet; of Cedar, 10,500,000 feet; of Spruce, 17,000,000 feet; of Sugar 
Pine. 4,500,000 feet, besides other kinds, the whole reaching upwards of 
309,000,000 feet. Then of sundries we find, of Shingles, 144,000,000; 
laths, 62,000,000; besides a vast number of Spars, Piles, R. R. Ties, etc. 
\\ e have vast unexplored forests of Redwood and Pine in this State, as 
u. 11 as I'ujet Sound, Oregon and Washington Teiritory. The opening up 
of the Northern Pacific Narrow-gauge Railroad to the Russian River 
country opens up to a vast territory of valuable Lumber that will be of 
inestimable value to the trade and commerce of this port. The Burrard 
Inlet Mills, British Columbia, also furnish considerable timber for export, 
and within a few days the ship Lookout has been chattered to proceed to 
that point for a cargo of Lumber for Australia. The freight of same to 
Sydney, £3 12s 6d ; to Melbourne, £3 17s Od ; or if to Adelaide, £4 2s fid. 

The foregoing lumber exhibit shows an increase of receipts of 3,000,- 
000 feet over those of the year preceding. Of late there has been estab- 
lished at Sancelito a Lumber Depot, where the Russian River product 
will be distributed. This promises to be a very important feeder to the 
lumber trade of this port. 

Quicksilver. --The New Almaden Mining Company, through Mr. J. 
B. Kandol, manager, furnish a statement of its product for 24 years and 3 
months, starting July, 1850, to December 3Lst, 1S7G, showing a total 
product of all the mines on the company's property of 027,002 flasks of 
76i lbs. each, or in pounds 47,965,653. These mines were first worked in 
1843, but on a small scale, and no records kept thereof until 1S50. Some 
500 or fiOO men find steady employment the year round. The reduction 
works of the Quicksilver Company consist of nine (9) furnaces, and in- 
clude the most improved methods of working Cinnibar ores known, and 
the whole working force as perfect and complete as possible. In our issue 
of last week we showed that the total quicksilver product of California in 
187fi aggregated 75,074 flasks, and of which the New Almaden produced 
20,031 flasks — present market price 50c. 

Treasure Exports, — Our exports for 1876, through public channels, 
excluding Post Office and Sub Treasury transfers, aggregated £49,780,000, 
against £43,000.000 the year preceding, and with all this large increase 
California was never so well off in gold and silver coin at the banks or 
monetary reservoirs as they now are and have been for months past. The 
accumulation of real wealth on the Pacific Slope the past few years is 
something marvelous. 

The Raisin product of this State in 1876 was not less than 38,000 
boxes of 20 lbs each, and had it not been for the early rains in October 
and November, it is probable that the quantity would have reached 50,000 
boxes at least. The stock here is large. . Some of the Raisins, particu- 
larly Blower's Muscatel, are of superior quality, yet we are sorry to be 
compelled to say that more than half the product is not up to the full 
standard of trade requirements. Nevertheless, we feel proud of Califor- 
nia's two years' experience in Raisin making. 



The Fruit shipments Eastward of green and ripe fruits in 1876 h 

the Pacific Railroad, including Pears, Crapes, etc., was Large, and of con- 
si lerable value. Sacramento and other growers figure up several hundred 
ear Loads to Chicago, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, St. Louis, etc., 
and it is probable that by the use of refrigerator cars in 187b' this trade 
will be prosecuted with renewed vigor. 

Hops.— Our receipts in 1876 aggregated 9,711 bales, against in 1875 of 
4,024, an increase of 2,787 bales. We have now a stock on hand of about 
,000 bales, held at 20(§ 22£c for good to choice. 

Hides. -- The receipts in 1876 were 16,300 less than in 1875, and the ex- 
ports 33,000 less. Low rates prevailed until the closing month of the 
year, when, by reason of an active trade in New York, prices here rallied 
to 20('_' 22c tor Dry, but have since fallen back to 18c. 

Tallow. —The market is quiet at 6c for good standard quality. 

Butter and Cheese. — Our Pacific coast product shows a steady gain, 
making us now self-producing, and entirely independent of Eastern marts 
for Butter, although some people will have a little Eastern Cheese. Our 
receipts of Butter (home dairies) in 1874, 7,408,500 lbs; 1875, 9,500,000 lbs; 
1876, 10,000,000 lbs. Of Cheese the local product received in 1874, 
5,000,000 lbs; 1875, 6,000,000 lbs; 1876, 7,000,000 lbs. The present price 
of good to choice Table Butter, 30(a.;35c; of Cheese, good to choice, 10@ 14c. 

Wheat. ~ Our exports since July 1st consist of 247 cargoes, 8,570,706 
ctls, value $15,356,053; same time, 1875, 126 cargoes, 4,558,863 ctls, value 
810,142,187, besides considerable Flour in same ships. We have at date 
on the Liverpool berth 22 ships, of 29,566 registered tons. The present 
price of shipping cargoes, S2 124@2 15; choice milling, $2 17i@2 20 $ 
ctl, market firm. 

Barley. ~ The recent advance has been lost in some measure, yet there 
is a strong undertone to the market, with sales of Feed at SI 25; Brewing, 
SI 35@1 37i. There is some small inquiry for Australia. 

Salmon. — There is a pause in the market for Oregon 1-th Fish for 
1876 catch. The last sales made for English account were at 811 50 ■Is 7 ? 
dozen. It is probable that more could be contracted for to be delivered in 
midsummer at this rate, yet prospective holders are not anxious to go too 
far until they know something more of the probable catch in Columbia 
River. Very large calculations are made for a big haul of Salmon in the 
spring. 

Borax. -- We hear of nothing doing at present. Prices low, as for 
months past. 

Bags and Bagging. — There is a demand for standard Burlap grain 
sacks at S-jsc, but holders demand 9c. Some expect the Spring market to 
open at 10c. Of course much depends upon the Spring season, wet or 
dry. If the former good prices will rule. 

Coffee. — Owing to a decline of l.J c. in New York buyers here purchase 
sparing!}'. Our stocks, however, are light, and leading holders will not be 
in a imrry to sell. The steamer Granada, from Central American ports, 
brought 3,500 bags, new crop, to many consignees anxious to realize, and 
this perhaps may be worked off at 20c.@21c, according to quality. 

Rice. — Stocks are large and the demand light. Hawaiian has been 
sold at 5£c.@6c; China, 5£c.@5;£c. 

Sugar. — There is an invoice of 1,000 bags China at hand per steamer 
now upon the market, and some 2,500,000 lbs. Hawaiian grocery grades. 
All the balance of our stuck, 7,500,000 lbs., is held by the Refiners, which 
gives a firm tone to the market— say 13c.@13.lc. for White, ( .k:(<< 10!c. for 
good to choice Yellow. 

Teas. — An auction sale of the " Hand" brand of Japans was held yes- 
terday at S. L. Jones & Co.'s, but with indifferent success. The " C. B." 
brand, "L." in a diamond, and " M. & Co." are the three brands which, 
to a great extent, rule this market, being both Black and ( rreen, China 
and Japans, either in bulk or papers. The standard price of Japan 
papers is 35(5>37-^c. There are, of course, many other brands in the mar- 
ket, such as " Comet," " Oolong," " Sutil," " Dragon," etc., but more is 
sold of the three brands first named than all of the others combined. 

Coal. --By reason of light imports of late from the colonies, *nd the 
few vessels loading at Newcastle at last mail dates for this port, cargo 
sales of Australian Steam have recently been made here at $8 \>l\0~i 8 75, 
while one cargo of Wallsend has been placed at §9. Seattle, Coos Bay 
and Bellingham Bay are now quotable at §8. Wellington and Nanaimo 
are held higher. 

Metals. —We hear of nothing doing in Pig Iron, Tin Plate, Sydney 
Tin, etc. The trade generally is very quiet at present, and pi ices for the 
most part favor the buyer. 

From China and Japan. —The Pacific Mail Steamship Alaska has 
arrived from Hongkong via Yukohama since our last, bringing for cargo 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAIST FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 27, 1877. 



4,207 pkgs. Tea, 3,440 mats Rice, 1,000 bags Sugar, etc., for this point; 
also in transitu for the East by Central Pacific 1,248 pkgB. Tea for New 
York, 1,744 pkgs. Tea for Chicago, 103 pkgs. for Baltimore. 

Kerosene Oils. —The ship Mary Whifcridge, for Hongkong, in Ma- 
condray's hue, will carry 3,000 cs. Devoe's Coal Oil, price 45c. Increased 
attention is being given to the production of California Earth Oil by the 
Star Oil Works Company. Several capitalists have taken hold of the 
matter in good earnest, and supplies are now arriving quite regularly 
from the southern coast counties. 

Wool.— The market at present continues inactive, with only a mod- 
erate stock, about 125,000 lbs, fair Northern fleece taken this week by 
local buyers at 15J@20c, according to quality. 

Flour.— The local trade continues to be supplied liberally with Baker's 
and Family Extras by the Golden Age, Golden Gate and Vallejo Starr 
Mills, at $6 50C« 7 § obi. Shipping Extras can be bought at 86; Extra 
Superfine, So 50; Superfine, 65 W 196 lbs. 



CONDENSED NEWS OF THE WEEK. 

LOCAL. 

Saturday, January 20th. —Bennett, ex-Pension Agent, was sentenced 
to two years 1 imprisonment, or $5,000 fine.— "Warrants have been issued 
for merchants on Clay and Davis streets for obstructing the sidewalks 
with their goods. ' ■■■ There are seventy-five persons aw liting examination 
by the next Grand Jury. The last Grand Jury examined 168 present- 
ments and found 134 true bills.— —Louis Foley, a wholesale butcher, was 
arrested nu a charge of mayhem. 

Sunday, 21st. — Frederic Luchs, a native of Germanj--, thirty-one 
years of age, died suddenly in a lodging house, No. 869 Market street. 
The body was taken to the Morgue.— Charles L. Benham, arrested on a 
charge of having obtained money by means of false pretences, has waived 
examination in the City Court, and is held to answer before the Grand 
Jury.— A State Convention of Turners is announced to take place in 
this city on February 18th and 19th.— Bishop Kip administered the 
right of confirmation, at St. John's Episcopal Church, to-day. —Father 
H. P. Gallagher lectured to-day, at St. Mary's, Oakland, on "Borne and 
and its Impressions." The offertory was for the benefit of the Hongkong 
Mission. 

Monday, 22d. — The next Palace Hotel hop is announced for Thurs- 
day evening, the 1st proximo. -^The second match between Crittenden 
Robinson and Captain Bogardus did not come off on Saturday. Both 
parties were on the ground, but could not agree upon the selection of a 
referee.-^— Mary F. Howland, forty-two years of age, and a native of 
Massachusetts, has been committed to the Napa Insane Asylum. The 
real estate agents doing business in this city have petitioned the Board of 
Supervisors to reduce the rates on license which it is proposed to issue to 
them. 

Tuesday, 23d. -- Judge Dangeifield to-day rendered judgment for 
plaintiff for Sl,300, in the suit of the Boston and Savannah Glass Com- 
pany vs. A. P. Bacon. Annie C Frie was granted a divorce to-day 
from Andrew J. Frie in the Fourth District Court, on the ground of 
habitual intemperance.— —Francisco Moreno, for making a burglarious 
entry into a Dupont store and carrying off a clock and other articles, was 
to-day held to answer in $3,000 bail.— The divorce suit of Gurnazzo vs. 
Gurnazzo has been referred to the Commissioner of the Third District 
Court. -^— Judge McKee has rendered judgment for §10,808 in favor of 
the plaintiff in the suit of Tracy vs. Des Rochevs et al. 

Wednesday, 24th. — The estate of the late Frank Swift will receive 
81,000 from the American Mining Board, New York, he having been a 
member of that institution, and the above amount being from the 
life insurance fund.— — The certificate of election of Gustave Touchard, 
D. J. Staples, Wm. Olmstead, A. J. Bryant, C. A. Laton, J. O. Grant 
and Hugh Craig, as Directors of the Underwriters' Fire Patrol, has been 
filed. —The steamer South. Carolina, which has been lying idle in port 
for several weeks, sailed for Panama at noon to-day. 

Thursday, 25th. — The Bohemian Club, with appropriate ceremonies, 
removed into its new quarters over the California Market last evening. 
The apartments were fitted up at a cost of §10,000, and the club enters 
them free from debt.— —The body of a man recently found hanging at 
Saucelito has been identified as that of David Perkins, sixty-nine years of 
age, a native of Maine, and a house-mover by occupation. < The Super- 
visors are investigating in their new work what grade is suitable for the 
Fifteenth avenue extension. 

Friday, 26th. —Ernest Wagner, a farmer of San Joaquin, has filed his 
petition in bankruptcy. His liabilities amount to 814,931, and assets to 
§12,000. Also Max Wagner, a saloon-keeper of Stockton. His debts 
amount to 55,712, and assets §0,300.^— Janagen Rene was assaulted in 
his room in a lodging house on Pacific street, between Dupont and Kearny, 
last night, by a quartet of ruffians.^— Robert Silbey, for a long time 
marine reporter for the Merchants' Exchange, died at Oakland on Wed- 
nesday, aged Gl years.— Ex- Assessor Levi Rosener is ill at the Palace 
Hotel with plenro-pneumonia.— — Don Yglesias and suite arrived as 
fugitives from Mexico. 



TELEGRAPHIC. 

Saturday, January 20th. — The ice in the Potomac broke up, doing 
great damage. The sharp running ice cut down and sank two or three 
schooners, several tug boats and a number of scows, loaded heavily.^— 
At a local election in Delisle village, Canada, some forty men engaged in 
a brutal free fight. The Town Hall was completely sacked.— The Sea- 
man's Protective Society of New York to-night passed resolutions author- 
izing the President to inform Mr. PHmsoll, M. P., England, that crews 
of fully ten vessels are starving on the streets of New York, and that the 
British Consul had been appealed to and can do nothing. 

Sunday, 21st.— The President has signed the bill authorizing the Van- 
couver Water Company to lay pipes across the Military Reservation.^— 
Tne President to-day nominated Solomon Cooper Receiver of Public 
Money at Humboldt, California.— -The nomination of J. L. Burchard 



to be Indian Agent at Round Valley Agency, California, was confirmed 
by the Senate to-day.— General John A. Miller leaves Washington to- 
night for California.— Judge Widney has arrived in Washington to urge 
the enactment of a bill confirming title to California school indemnity 
selections. Horton, of San Diego, has also arrived and is working with 
Felsenheld to defeat the Texas Pacific Railroad bill unless it be amended 
so as to provide for a direct line. 

Monday, 22d.— By order of General Augur, the State Librarian, who 
was deposed by Nicholls yesterday at New Orleans, was reinstated to- 
day. Barron left the Republican House to-day, and was sworn in by the 
Democratic House. — It was ascertained to-day that the President has 
said it is his intention to sign the bill providing for the counting of the 
electoral vote in case it passes both houses of Congress. The twenty- 
fifth annual meeting of the B'nai Brith of the United States commenced 
at Cincinnati to-day. About one hundred delegates have arrived. 

Tuesday, 23d —The steamer Lotus sails to-morrow from New Haven 
for Constantinople', with a cargo of arms and ammunition for the Turks 
valued at a million and a quarter. Charles W. Chadwick, one of the 
parties implicated in the forgery of the check for -%4,000 on the Union 
Trust Company, was arrested this afternoon.-^— John R. McPherson was 
to-night nominated for United States Senator of New Jersey by the Dem- 
ocratic caucus. -^At a meeting of leading business and professional men 
of Richmond the Joint Committee's bill was indorsed. 

Wednesday, 24th. — Grisley, who has been on trial at San Diego for 
the past week for the murder of the stationkeeper, Bowers, at Mountain 
Springs, was found guilty of murder in the second degree. The prisoner 
will receive sentence next Tuesday. Hon. Charles B. LawreiKx- was 
unanimously nominated by the Republican caucus for United States Sen- 
ator of Illinois, General Logan having peremptorily declined to permit 
the further use of his name. — -It is expected that the special House com- 
mittees on the Presidential election in Florida and South Carolina will 
make their reports at the close of this week. — The House Seryeant-at- 
Arms left New Orleans this evening for Washington, via Mobile, with 
t lassaneuve and ICei.ner, members of the Returning Board. 

Thursday, 25th. — The Secretary of the Treasury to-day issued the 
thirty-eighth call for the redemption of ten millions ot five-twenty bonds 
of 1805, May and November. The principal and interest will be paid on 
and alter the 24th "f April next, and interest will cease on that day.-^ 
General Belknap has informed District Attorney Wells that he will apply 
on the 29th instant for a trial of the suit against him in the Circuit 
Court.— At 7:30, after an all-night session, the Senate passed the Com- 
promise bill without amendment. Various amendments were submitted, 
but all voted down. Eaton was the only Democrat who voted against it. 

Friday, 26th. —James H. Bland, a prominent young lawyer of Los 
Angeles, died of malignant diphtheria. —In the Massachusetts House 
to-day resolutions were adopted favoring the Electoral bill and an amend- 
ment to the Constitution clearly prescribing the mode for counting the 
Electoral vote. Only 10 dissented.— —Judge David Davis of the United 
States Supreme Court was elected Senator from Illinois on the first ballot 
to-day. 



FOREIGN. 

Saturday, January 20th. —With the break up of the Conference 
ends the old-fashioned policy which accepted Turkey as an hereditai-y 
responsibility of England. Henceforward Turkey must patch up its 
credit the best way it can and fight its own battles. —The Austrian 
Government has concluded a loan of 70,000,000, gold, with various Lon- 
don, Vienna and Paris banks. This loan is the balance of 110,000,000 
florins, which the Keichstadt authorized the Minister of Finance to raise. 
Two important engagements have been recently fought on the island 
of Cuba. The most important took place at Farrallones, where the Span- 
ish were defeated by the Cubans under Generals Modesta, Diaz and An- 
tonio Macea. The other was at Zopata, and here also the Spanish forces 
suffered another reverse.-^— Russia is endeavoring to secure the neutral- 
ity of Austria in the event of war. 

Sunday, 21st.— The German Government has decided to abolish all 
honorary Consulates in the United States in favor of paid officials, the 
Consulate General at New York and the Consulate at San Francisco ex- 
cepted. ^— The work on the fortifications at Metz and Strasbourg is being 
pushed forward to completion with the utmost haste, and provisions for 
the same are arriving. ^— The coral fishers of Terre del Greece are fitting 
out vessels for an expedition to a newly discovered reef between Bermuda 
and Nova Scotia. -—The Porte informed Servia that it would on no con- 
sideration renew the armistice, but would march on Belgrade if Servia 
did not treat directly with Turkey for peace before March 1st. Prince 
Milan is in favor of such peace. 

Monday, 22d.~ The Marquis of Salisbury and suite left Constantino- 
ple to-day for Brindisi, calling at Piraeus and Corinth. He will return to 
London before the opening of Parliament.— The Porte has intimated 
that soon after the closing of the Conference it would spontaneously offer 
considerable concessions to the Powers, which it now refuses to yield 
to compulsion.— A cable special says the German Government possesses 
ample proofs of the existence of a large monastic conspiracy in France to 
gain power in that country for purposes hostile to Germany. 

Tuesday, 23d. —It is now beyond doubt that the American ship 
George Green, Captain Wilcox, has been lost with all on board. An in- 
quest has been held at Kingston, Devonshire, England, on a body winch 
has been identified as that of the Captain's wife.— —A special from Vi- 
enna reports that the officers of Russian railways have been ordered to 
hold their roads in readiness from the end of the present week for a large 
increase of military transportation.— Prince Hohenlohe, German Em- 
bassador, has lost no opportunity of assuring the Duke de Cazes that 
Germany regards the attitude of France in regard to the Eastern compli- 
cations with the best feelings, notwithstanding the attacks of the German 
press. 

Wednesday 24th.--The Registrar-General's report shows that small- 
pox in London, England, is decreasing, 70 deaths occurring last week 
against 100 the week previous.- — ' 



-Commercial intercourse between Rus- 



J in. 87, L877. 



POSTS* RIPTTO THE SA» FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



MINING STOCK CONVULSIONS. 
The following article ia from the ( Berald, probably the 

best tin;ii:.-i;U authority in tin- country. We reprint it without comment : 
.ii" time p.ust the atmosphere which envelope the mining stock 
market hits been thick, murky ;m<l pestilential, by reason of the douhte, 
fears, bickerings, accusations and counter accusations, rings, cliques and 
rate combinations with which it has been corrupted; and we Bhall 
the gloom aud let in a little pure air and light. From 
the date of -n rast ami rich on- bodies in the ConistuL-k lode. 

■ Ivanoed and n ■• d< d, and, in anmeroDs cases, in accordance 
n i tli developments in the mines. Panics and serious depressions in Btocks 
however, occurred without satisfactory reason.' It will be remem- 
bered that January loth was on..- oi the darkest days ever known in the 
!. Its approach had bees heralded by constant depressions and 
downward tendencies for a week preceding, and at the date specified the 
culminating point was reacfied, producing something very near a panic. 
It i- a well known attribute uf human nature, as a rule, to throw the 
onus "i" misfortune upon the Bhoulders of some one else, and especially is 
this true of those whose dishonorable practices have procured affliction 
!. to shelter themselves by accusing others. It is also undeniable 
that the pros] • cons are generally objects of envy and malevolent feeling 
to the unprosperous, and we have been in no wise surprised at the malig- 
nant tone and character of the charges that have been hurled at Messrs. 
Flood, O'Brien, Mackay and Fair, the envied controllers of the '* bonanza 
mines.* 1 But, without dwelling on that significant fact, we are of opinion 
that a natural solution can be reached without difficulty by simply com- 
paring the alternations in the prices of a number of mining stocks during 
•Inly last, when very serious depressions occurred, and those ruling in 
January, culminating on the 13th. We annex a short table: 

■/»!>/, 1870. Jan. 13, 1877. 

Alpha $47 00 sn* no 

Belcher 18 00 8 00 

Bullion 42 00 8 00 

Exchequer 17 00 4 00 

l Ion. Imperial (j 00 1 37A 

Justice 2G 00 9 50" 

Kentuck 13 00 4 00 

Ophir 50 00 16 50 

Savage 22 00 7 50 

Sierra Nevada 17 00 5 00 

Union 17 00 7 00 

-Mexican 40 00 14 00 

Yellow Jacket 30 00 9 50 

Crown Point 12 00 4 75 

Chollar 100 00 40 00 

Attention is directed to the exceeding discrepancies in prices of the 
above stated stocks, and we now turn to a consideration of those which 
took place in tlie bonanza stocks during the same period. In July Cali- 
fornia sold at §56 per share, and since then has paid dividends to the 
amount of $12 per share, while its selling price on the 13th of January 
was $45 per share. Con. Virginia sold in July at $45 per share, and on 
the 13th of January at §35 per share, having in the meantime disbursed 
dividends of $10 per share. Furthermore, we state right here that 
seventy-two per cent, of the gross yield of these two mines have been paid 
to the stockholders under the management of Messrs. Flood, O'Brien 
Mackay and Fair, while the very best managed among the other mines 
of the Comstock lode has never paid more than fifty per cent, of the gross 
yields to the shareholders. Had not the bonanza firm recently sustained 
the market prices would have reached a far lower depth than they did, 
and this we assert positively. It has become quite apparent that the raid 
recently inaugurated upon bonanza stocks is the work of a combination or 
" ring," backed up, according to report, by a fund of §7,000,000, and it is 
beyond question that what is known as the " borrowing process," or the 
duplicate use of stocks, has been carried to greater extremes than ever 
thereby placing stocks actually owned by parties other than brokers, yet 
confided to brokers for negotiation, in the most jeopardous and precarious 
position. We learn that quite a number of brokers have been warned, by 
an authoritative source, to desist from such questionable operations giv- 
ing a limited time to heed the warning. After a cool, dispassionate' sur- 
vey of the facts, we express our conviction that grave injustice has been 
done to parties who are not only blameless but praiseworthy for the gen- 
eral course of their management and the promptitude with which they 
have acted to put a quietus to unscrupulous practices which endanger the 
interests of a large number of stockholders. 



. I *till, owing to prohibitory di 

the 1 v 

■ niier.'^— A lit-- broke out in Si 
.■id. to-day, while the men were it work, and 

1 ' now !i t" bai i ' is mi 

t-wr the bodiea. ■ ' 'The Turkish Bml 
inaultatton in Peath to-day on Turkeys future course, informed 
-v that the Porte intended to make paaoa with Servia and 
tnd requested Aaidrasay's mediation. 
Thursday, 25th.-- Safvet Pasha had an interview with General tgnat* 
i i notified him of the Por ication to France and England 

. I inf< inwd him that the Porte proposed to cany out 
..1 bisown tic- will .dl 1 4 forma demanded by the Conference.— The 
irreepondent of the Ttswi states that M1dh.1t Pasha intimated to 
If that upon the bre*Kiug up <<i the Conference be would enter 
into direct negotiations wil b Russia.— • A dispatch from Semlin bi 

1 orkiah Envoy i> waiting in this place with powers t<> 
te preliminaries of peace with Servia. The policy of Servis is 
mill undivided. 

Friday, 26th.— Russia and Turkey are continuing their warlike prepa- 
rations ' ' 1 Servian troops are again marching to the front. —Peaceful 
measun d in Cuba. ^— Tin- French Chamber of Deputies has 

Committee. The saooeesful candidates are Republi- 
cans, and the majority are Gambettists. The election of Gambetta as 
President of the * Committee 1- assured. 



CRADLE. ALTAR. AND TOMB. 



CRADLE 

Arxmtin In this city, Januarj if 1 a son. 

. . ■ .1 El. Brown, a 00 

January 18 Corcoran, a ion. 

> * ■ ■ ■ In this dty, J [J ■■ . hler. 

of Ernest Emmrich, a ion. 
Fbrkcu In this city. J&nuu 1 20, to I hi ■■ Ifi ol J B Fr< m b 

1 In this city, J uiuarj 21, to th ol 1. Goldsmith, a daughter. 

11 ls.ru Id ti ■, ■.■ ,-.- ..in 11 iri Is, ad lighter, 

lo thU dty, Januarj 10, to the wife of Wm L Joffory.ason, 
Kati in tonicity, January 21, to the wifo ol K. Katx, a daughter. 
Loxa in i a in- oi 11 Long, 11 son. 

In this city, Januarj L6» tothi * Ife ol P \. UcDonald, a daughter. 
In 1 in- city, Januarj 20, - thi Ife ol John Marshall, a. daughter. 
Pkckiuu In Ibis city, Januarj 16, tol a ol B n Peotcham, ■ 

h L8, to tho v ■ Roberta, a ion. 

Simpson in Hij- city, Januarj 22, to the w lf< of Oapt J. Blmpson, a daughter. 

Inthl city, J .''■;, L0, to thi nrlfe of W. J. Vincent, a Bon. 

WuiTB In this city, Jai •} 10, to the wife ol Wm. 11. White, a daughter. 

ALTAR. 
r, in mi, 1. -si am, 1 .v In Oakland, Januarj 22, T, R, Coghill to K. E Stanley. 
GiBSOtr-SiULLiNQ in this city, January 23, i. B, Gibson to J Shilling. 
11 muiv-Tuask Is Sun Jose, .January 'in, M. Ii. llanli to E. P. Trask. 
Kisa Shki.i in tbifl city, January 26, T. B King to E, a, Noble. 
Uoro&n-Moonb -in this dty, January is, i;. Morgan to M. A. Hoone. 
Norm asn-simi.n -in this city, January , L. Nordmann to Ida Simon. 
Olivbr-Harrok — In this city, January IS, J. Oliver to V Harron. 

s, m ; Si i:ismas -In i his city, January 21, Wm. Schreffer to L. Stoinman, 

Todd-Qamppbr iii this city, January 21, 0. W. Todd i" s. K. Gampper. 
Wiiittman-Kaliiklkis.ii— hi this city, January 21, <;. Whittman to L. Kalbfleisch. 

TOMB. 
Abbott-- In Oakland, Jauuary -22. Mary E Abbott, aged 71 years. 
Bahluw— In this city, January :!"-', Alice Barlow, aged SSy.ars. 
i odb In thiscity, January 21, John Code, aged 51 years. 
Daly— in this city, January 21, Peter Daly, aged 50 yearg. 

l-'oLKV In this city, January '0, Fernainl«'i l-'nley, a/etl '.1 years'. 
Gallejo— In thiscity, January 24, Sdanuel Gallejo, aged 27 years. 

linn an In this city, Januarj liii. M;iry Hogan, aged 4,'. year's. 

KitANznu In this city, Jouuury 22, Joseph Kranzer, aged S2yeara 
I LAFFlN- In this city, January 23, Walter Latlin, aged '■'■'< years. 
.Mult in this city. Januarj' ^l, George Molt, Dgea 28 years. 
McLkan — In tlm city, January 24, (.'. McLean, aged 'S-i years. 
O'Roi/rke— In this city, January 10, Dora O'Bourke, aged 54 years. 
Phillips— In this city, January 21, Elizabeth Phillips, aged 41 years. 
Ralph— in Alvarodo, January 20, J. FI. Ralph, aged 20 years. 
Kri.iusoN -In tins city, January 20, Mattie Palmer Rulofson, aged 12 years. 
Smith— In this city. January 21, Pauline Smith, aged 21 years. 
Trass— In this city, January 25, A. B. Traek, aged 55 years. 
WlLLBOK— In this city, January 2.i, .h.hn (_'. Willson, aged 23 years. 



LIES OF THE DAY. 

A lie has no lepa, and cannot stand: but it has wines, and can fly far and wide. — 
Wardortom. With the adaptability of a lie, sin has many tools, but a lie is the handle 
which fits them all.— Lord Brougham. A lie begets others: one lie must be thatcbed 
with another, or it will soon rain through.— Lord Thurlowe. 

"And the Parson made it his text that week, and he said likewise, 
That a lie which is half alio is ever the blackest of lies; 
That a lie that is all a lie may be met and fought with outright. 
But, a lie which is part a truth is a harder matter to fight.— Tennyson. 

San Francisco Lies. — It is not true that the clay bust presented to 
Judge W. did not amount to much, but it was " the head and front" and 
all that was left of a busted bank. ^— That Moody and Sankey are likely to 
be worsted in their proposed wrestle with Satan in San Francisco.—" 
That " a wise and learned judge " has established a precedent by which the 
Evangelists will be injuncted from any hostile demonstrations against Mr. 
S.^— That gravestones being "as cheap as wood," it behooves the poor to 
lay in a stock thesre ma'arious times. ^— That, though a Democratic com- 
munity to the chore, we all cry in chore-us, "Vive la Heine."— That 
Schleswig may be great on the piano, but his /orfc is pedro.— — -That I. G. 

Al n's favorite maxim ia "charity begins at home."— That a large 

portion of his charitable contributions seem to have stayed there.— — That 
he is about to join the angelic choir led 1 y Kalloch, who are preparing to 
receive the Lord's annointed, viz.: Moody and Sankey. —That the dis- 
charge of Moreno, the wife-beater, was in order, as it was not a case of 
assault, but only a little game of " poker." That the next time she in- 
tends to hold a full hand.— —That the Chronicle reporter declined a 860 
douceur to hold his peace on the " paviug outrage."— That the way the 
contractors' will probably take is always well paved — " with good inten- 
tions. "^— That "the feast of reason and the flow of soul " are now the 
sole attractions at the melodeons. < That owing to the unusual moral 
demonstrations of the police the whisky will henceforth cease to flow.— 
That a ra d on the ladies was unnecessary, as they were arrayed them- 
selver — though in scant attire.—— That Mordyand Sankey's first efforts in 
San Francisco will be for the conversion of the News Letter and the other 
religious press.^^That Frodsham's calves were not padded at Crystal 
Fount masquerade. 

British Columbia Lies.— It is not true that the Premier, having been 
politely requested by expectant office-holders to resign, has shamefully 
neglected to do so.— ^That Lord Carnarvon has telegraphed us not to 
disrupt the British Empire until his letter arrives.— That unless he 
gives us " the terms" we shall secede, and annex California and the ad- 
jacent States.^— That we are a small community, but full of the devil 
when riled. 

Central Pacific Railroad. — The gross earnings of the Central Pacific 
Railroad for December were reported at §1,411,000, against §1,279,000 for 
the same month last year. The total earnings for the year 1870' are given 
at 818,184,200, against §16,970,000 in 1875, and 14,522,800 in 1874. It is 
needless to say that the receipts last year were the largest yet. A force 
of one thousand operatives are now steadily at work on the Southern 
Pacific Railroad east of Indian Wells in the Colorado Desert, and it is 
estimated that the line to Fort Yuma will be fully completed by the end 
of March next. This work has been carried out with tremendous energy 
and great administrative ability. — Com. Herald. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 27, 1877. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Keccrdsd in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for tha 
Week ending January 25, 1877. 

Compiled from the Record* of the Mercantile Agency of John McEilloj) tfc Co., 
401 California Street, San Fra7idsco. 



Friday, January 19th. 



liHANTOR TO GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Edw Pond In Chaa Randall 

Thos M Smith to w" II Wieeter.. 

Wm Hollis toS S Wright 

J s < lohen to A Hay ward 

TBReut to E J Baldwin 



Wm Hollis to John A Remer |W Buchanan, 25 s Sutter, 23:6x87:6., 

Jno Philippi to II A Philippi Und % s O'Farrell, 137:6 e Fillmore, e 

68:9x120 

. |Blk4(i4, W A 

.|Loes225&nd 227, Gift Map 1 

. \V Jessie. 216:6 n 21et, 21:Hx75 

,|Und '; blk 19. N B, to correct error 

. Se Market. 275 ne 6th, 1 37:15x170 ; also, 

so Stevenson, &70ne 6th, 137:6x70 

Annie Coster to Wm Levy lLot 1575. Gift Map 3 

IsancS Allen to Alice J Allen .... IE Dolores, 61 n 23d, 1S8xl 17:6; also. lots 
21 ro -21, I.Ik 829. Tide Lands, subject 

tomort for $4,000 

N*wl7th and Folsom, 140x245 

N O'Farrell, 62:6 e Iiflgnna, 25x120 

N O'Farrell, 87:6 e Lacuna, 25x120 

ELaauna, 95 n O'Farrell, 25x62:6 

Se Market, 275 ne 6th, 137:6x170; also, 

bc Stevenson, 275 ne 6th, 1:37:6x75 

Portions of O L hlks 617. 646. 645, 614.. 

Lots 383. 385, 387, Gift Map 2 

Se Sanchez and Valley, 100x26:6 

W Buchanan, 25 8 Sutter, 22:6x87:6 



Wm Center to Wm A Steele 

S S Wclton to Julia Hunt 

Same to Pat'k O'Connor ., 

Same to John C O'Mahony , 

F McCrellish to E J Baldwin 



Lloyd Tcvis to R C Wood worth . 
M (i Sullivan to Jane Sullivan... 
.T Steinbergerto Jerry Falvey... 
TR E A to J A Rnner 



$4,250 

Gilt 

yn.tioo 

300 

3.560 

4,200 

10 
125 



5 
5 

275000 

20,1 i 

250 

525 

4,250 



Saturday, January 20th. 



Wm Hollis to A M Goldsmith ... 
S P O'Connor to John II Turney. 

RFlcniken to A P Willev 

Terminus H As n to S S Eckfeldt 
F L APiocheto.I M Eckfeldt ... 

Wm Moody to Virginia Farish 

A Kronberg to J C Weir 

Paul Roil«ael to Jno Van Berge 

B .1 Shay to Geo Tbistieton 

B E Arnold to City und Co S F. 
City and Co S F to B E Arnold. 
Bridget Bannan to A Spinetti.. 



D L Randolph to W Bartlett.. 
AuneM Randolph to same 



. W Buchanan, 02:6 n Post. 23:6x92:6 

. S Jackson, 117 w Dramm, 38x120 

. W Taylor, 34:6 n Jackson, 40x125 

. Lots 6 and 7, blk 136, Terminus H'd 

. Lot 20, blk 13, Junction H'd 

.ISnndry lots in various homesteads ' 

.lL Post, 110:6 w Laguna, 27x137:6 

.|Nw Baker and Fell, 275x396:10^ 

. LotS blk F, R It H'd 

. Streets and highways 

. N 24th, 116 e Folaom, 37:6x100 

. Com at a pt in w 1 of 50-vara 374, 57:6 n 
Green, 20x5^:9 

. Und H e Tiylor, S7:6 s Turk, 25x85, sub- 
ject to mortgage for $5,000 

. X Ellis, 210:7^ w Powell. 34:4^x137:0, 

I subject to mortgage tor $10,000 

John Center to Thos Cusack IE Marrinou, 125 s^22d. 30x100 

W J Gunn to Ma.-y A Mowry Se 30th and Bartlett, 50x125; also, s Val- 

I ley, 289:10 e Dolores. 27:6x114 

Jas Young to Wm Barclay I Lot 6. blk 14, Market St H'd 

Sam'l Hancock to John Cody Nw Natoma, 175 w 6th, 25x75 

B W Gunn to Jno Wpoitiswood |Ne Steiner and Wildey, 25x82:3 



$4,250 

3,700 

16.01(0 

1.000 

350 

2,000 

2.600 

40,000 

192 

1 



1,500 

6,000 

22,000 
2 

1,250 

700 

2,850 

1,350 



Monday, January S2d. 



II Ens! man to E H Rixlord 

Ell Rixford to Lafayette Story .. 
John Martin to Mary J Martin... 

Luke Stone to Mary Stone 

loss to Bridget Noonan ... 

Q Mc Williams to A McNeil 

Same to Stephi n McNeil 

B G Lathrop to Emma Luclers 

S V H'd As'n to M Housman 

J W Flood to A Hem me 

Wm Ristenpart lo J W Flood.... 

Adam Parker lo A T Corbus 

L S Wilton to Jane! Patou 

T D Tobin to M J McDonald 

B V U'd As'n to Jus H Page 

S Gilmoreto same 

J H Page to John Taylcr 



O F Gifiin to Ann Puree]! . 
W J Gunn to F C Kleebaui 



S Clay, 53:4 e Taylor, 3x60 

Same 

W Van Ness. 70 e Ellis, 50x109:9.. 

S Waller, 117 w Bnchamm, 24x137:6.... 

N Parker, 100 w Cal'a av, 50x100 

Sw Prospect av and Eugenia si, 23:4x70 
S Eugenia, 23:4 w Prospect av, 33:4x70 . 
N Francisco, 68:9 e Powell, 23:11x68:9. . 
Lot 5, blk 18, S V H'd 

s Eddy, 137:6 e Scott, 25x137:6 

Sume 

W Jones, 52:6 n Jackson, 311x87:10 

Se Laguna and Pine, 80x47:6 

S O Parrel), 110 w Larkin. 27:6x137:6 ... 

Lot 6, blk 513, Bav View H'd 

Ne29th av, 35 nw J si, 75x150 

Same ; also, lots 3 and 4, In blk 27, F.x- 
celsior H'd : also, lot 6, blk 513, Bay 
View H'd ' 

Se Stevenson, 275 sw 7lh, 55x75 

S Clipper, 202 e Church, 52x114 



Gift 

Gift 

900 

267 

217 

1,500 

360 

1.210 

1.240 

7, 0U0 

15,500 

500 

1,080 



5 
5,500 



Tuesday, January 23d. 



Jus Kelley to Cecilia Mahon iS Tyler, 20 w Dale pi. 20x57:6 | 

J B Bourne to Mary ABourne [Com 195 n 25th, ana 117:6 e Bartlett, n 

I n 25, etc ; also, e BarMelt, 195 n 25th, 

1 n 65, e 117:6, s 5, etc 

D P Barstow to Jae R Keene [Sundry blks in Potrero Nuevo 

L s We lion to Janet Paton 'BLajruna, 70 e Pine, 22:6x80 

David Wooslerto A A Webster ...|W Webster, SO n Fulton. 20x55 | 

Columbia H As'n to G F Waller. . |E Sanchez, 51:6 n Valley, 75x100 

L Dinke'.spiel to Rob'-. Mitchell ...(S Turk, 1 10 w Franklin, 37.11x1211.. . 



Geo Kennedy to R J Uuekley , 

A Downey to Wm Boyle 

Jas Moore to J Borncmann.. 



C J McFaddin to G McWilliams .. 

GeoMcWilliamstoEG Clark .... 
Mary McFaddin to G McWilliams. 

T C Cave to Louis Schultz 

L Desculso to M C do Laveaga 

T K Southern to Jas T Getchell.. 

C D Olds to John L Stove 

E F Palmer to John F Ortmann . . 
F O Wakerauu to C McCormick. .. 

H H Whitcomb to A A Webber . . . 
Nathan Troll lo Allie Cary 



G McWilliams to John White 

Chaa Mayne to John Patterson 

.1 i. Kinnpke to B L Brandt 

SFLHiRR Co to A Buckiuan 
T B Lewis to same 



S Pine, 23 e Broderick, 21:6x07 

Lot 11, b,lt3. Noe Garden H'd 

Lotsl to 3, blk D. lot 1. blk Q, lot 7. blk 

Q, Eureka H'd: also, w Dolores, 65 n 

34th; 55x117:6 

Sw Guerrero and 17th, s 35x80 ; also, w 

Guerrero, 60 s 17th, 100x89 

W Guerrero, 110 s 17th, 511x80 

W Guerrero, 160 s 17lb, 50x80. 

X Filbert, 187:6 W Pierce, 40:1x137:6 

NeTnik i.nd Polk, 137:6x137:6 

Lots 1415 to 1417, Gift Map 3 

Sundry lots in Western Addition 

Nw Pacific and Buchanan, 68:9x260:2^ 
Nw Greenwich & Fillmore, 137:6x137:6; 

w Fillmore, 155 n Greenwich, 24x93.. 

Ne Church and 17th, e 114:10, etc 

N Greenwich, 206:3 e Dupont,17:2 , . 1 s70; 

n Fell, 55 W Gongh. 27:0x126 

W Cal'a av, -165 n Virginia av, 25x100 .. 

Se Church and 28th, 26:6x100 

SeTonquin and Webster, 4 12:6x875 

Blk 135. and Iota 8 .ml 9, Univ'tv M S.. 
Same; also, lot 164, blk 129 



$ 



Gift 

31,000 
5 
1,500 
1.200 
6,500 
3,600 
450 



9,000 
7,250 
3.383 
1.750 

35,000 
1,100 

13, cob 

75 
412 

5,210 

550 

3,50il 

1 

450 



Wednesday, January 24th. 



T II Selby by exrs to M S Latham 



Henrietta I Selby et al to same.. 
Martin Bllzzini to Joseph Black 
John While to Edward Barron.. 



T H Holt et al to Jno L Jones.. 

Wm Nelson to F H Di uffer 

City and County S F to H Gabb Jr 
HGahh.Jr to G Dietach et al.. .. 
Edward E Potter lo Wm B Ward.. 
City and County S F to J Sullivan 
J J Reardon to City and Co S F. . 

Gui-eppe Solari toCath Solori 

C W Bonynge to R S Bonynge 

Hib Savand Loan Soc to S Jones 

Same to Peter Enright 

Bridget Howling to Mlchl Kenny. 
Patrick Grady to Caleb J Doposs. . 



Wm Hollis to Mary E Talcott . 

W Chapman to W J Gnnn 

M de Suza to Marg't de Suza.. 
Same to same 



Und ^ aw Market and Main, 45:10, se 

45:tn, se 91:8, sw 22:11, etc 35,000 

Same 10 

Lot 12, blk 1, Garden Tract Hd 300 

3 Eddy, 275 e Mason, S 94:9, ne 161:9, w 

131:3 to commencement 250000 

Se Buchanan and Chestnut, e 27:5x137:6 1,0. ;s 
N Filbert, 30 w ol" Taylor, 11 60, e 30, etc 10 

S 26th, lOlie Minion, e 87, s 100, etc 

S 26th, 143:/;. e Mission, n 43:6, s 120, L -tc 2.500 

S Bush, 68:9 w Lvon, 59x137:6 2,000 

Nw Market and Polk, n 16:31, etc 

Streets and Highway? l 

Lots 5. s, 8, b;k 21, West Bod Map 1.... Gilt 
N California. 91:8 e Dnimm, e 88:1, etc. Gilt 

E Hartford. 86 s 19th, £9*125 525 

Nw Clary, 100 sw Ritch, 25x75 2,500 

Ne Pacific and Salmon, 20x70 5.000 

S 19th, 155 e Nop. e 50x114— lot 6 blk 107 

Buena Vistu Hd— sub to mort lor $450 150 
N O'Farrell, 337:0 w Steiner. 22x82:6 . . . 3,790 

E Sanchez, 101:6 s Duncan. 25x100 234 

I W Potrero av. 20 n 23d, 25x100 :.| Gift. 

|Lo ts 1 to 16, h lk 235, Tide Lands | 1,400 



Thursday, January 25th. 



Bailey Sargent to H Schmiedel . . . 



Nw Market, 175 ne City Hall av, 25x100; 
UW Market, 160 ne City Hal! av, 25x100 

Nw 43d av and D st, w 112:10, etc 

Se 29th and Sanchez, 80x114 .. 

I, i>! 3, blk A.PacSuv & H'd Ass'n 

W Steiner, 125 s Bush, 25x110 

Ne Spiar, 1S3:4 nw Folsom, 45:10x137:0. 

W Kansas, 225 n Nevada. 25x100 

X Tyler, 125 w Devisadero, 12:0x137:6 .. 

S Sadowa, 50 w Marengo, 25x125 

;Se Howard, 275 sw 5th, 25x8 1 

j\V Fair Oaks. 122 s 2id, 36x117:6 

[Sundry lots in Fairmount and G Map 3. 



W H Grattun to Jno M Nichols. 
S and L Soc'v to Jno E Treacey. 

Thos N Wand to C CKane 

A McNullanto A McNnllan 

S F Sinclair to A B Grogan 

T P Riordan to Mary Crobcrt . . . 
A B McCreery to Jim Sullivan .. 

John MorrisloJ B Neuleus 

C A James to Susan K James . . 

F Pl'eiffer to W J Houston 

I Co!m to M B Lichtenstein 

H S and L Soc'y to same Se Pine and Scott, 62:6x82 

Benj Dreyl'nss toO^nlzer Sundry lot- in P N 263 

W S wnd ley to A Dohrmau E 41si av, 225 s O 5t, 50x120 

Geo Anthony to E W Burr S Bush, 30 w Clara, 85x137:6 

E W Burr to Minnie Anthony Same 

Morris Shloss to Wm Williams 'e Powell, 115:6 n Cal'a, 22x72, subject to 

I mortgage lor $2.374 

RC Rogers toMDore IN Kate, 81:3 e Fillmore, 25x120 

Jno Harrington to M Harrington. . N Post. 162:6 e Buchanan, 50x137:6 



880 
1,000 
Gilt 

125 

800 
150 
50 

Gift 

8,800 
800 

2,825 

4,000 

101 

3,000 

5 

3,625 
1,100 

G ll't 



[Permanent Advertisements.] 

A ROGUE'S RETROSPECT. 

[From the New York Tribune, June 6, 1849.] . 
" Loring: Pickering-, late editor of the St. Louis Union, absconded recently, 
" leaving, it is said, many of his friends in the lurch for large amounts. On the 25th 
" ult- a warrant was issued for his arrest on a charge of forgery, preferred by Samuel 
"Treat, Esq. Officers were immediately Bent up the Missouri' in pursuit of him, us 
" it was supposed he had started for California.— Philadelphia Bulktin." 

[From the New York Tribune. June IS, 1849.] 
"Arrest of Pickering:, late Editor of the St. Louis Union. — Subse- 
" quent accounts do not entirely confirm the reports hitherto received. It is now 
"stated, by those who ought to know, that Pickering was arrested in St. Joseph by 
" Messrs. Treat A: Krumrun, and subsequently committed to the custody of Mi" 
"Sheriff, or one of Ins deputies, of Buchanan County. While in custody lie fi 
"means to escape, and made off to parts unknown. The party in pursuit of him, it 
"is said, only succeeded in obtaining 5=700 L-om him, and no other property or notes. 
" Those in pursuit, we are told, were not prepared with any authority to follow him 
" beyond the limits of the State. — St. Louis Republican, UUh. 

[From the New York Tribune, June 20, 1849.) 
11 The Abscjuatulator. — Information was received from St. Joseph yesterday 
"that Messrs krumrun & Treat came tip with Pickering at that place; that they 
"compounded with him for his offenses by receiving some $750 in money and about 
"$4,000 in notes of hand, etc., and then let him go. When the boat left be was fit- 
" ting out for California, and they were returning by easy stages to St. Louis. — &t. 
" Louis Republican, 9th. 

["The above named Loring Pickering is now one of the Proprietors of the San 
Francisco Duihj Keening Bulletin, and Mowing Call, two papers published in 
this city.] 

CENTENNIAL SURGERY. 
The foUowing liniment was prescribed for a broken thigh-bone by— 



Chloroform 

Tinet : Arnica (?).. 



Oakland. | Dr. Babcock State Medical Examiner. 

i. A. F. SaWYEB San Francisco : 

2 02. I Tinet: Camphor 2 oz. 

2 oz. I Ol : Origanum (V) 1 oz. 

Ol : Olive 1 oz. M. 



Ft Liniment — Sign — Apply with friction two or three times a day. 
Use the above for two mouths, and, if it should not produce the effect desired, use 
t on your boots. THE VI (TIM. 

Is it Repudiation ? — For the State of California to issue bonds, neglect to pro- 
vide for tbeir redemption at maturity, refuse payment and then deny the holders the 
right of trial in her own Courts. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMsHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's steamers will sail as follows at 12 SI.: 
ALASKA, February 1st, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

GRANADA, January 30th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at ACAi'i" [<( i, 
SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA and PUNTA ARENAS. Tickets to and from , urope 
by any line for sale. 

ZEALANDIA, January 31st, or on arrival of the English mails, for HONOLULU, 
K.WOAVAU, AUCKLAND, SYDNEY and PORT CHALMERS. To Sydney or Auck- 
land — Upper Saloon, $210; Lower Saloon, $200. 

DAKOTA, Jan. :«th, CITY OF PANAMA, Feb. 10th, and alternately on the 30th, 
10th and 20th of each month, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND. SiiATTLK, l A 
COMA and OLYMPIA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad (or 
PORTLAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. oh day of sailing, 

For freight or passage apply at the office, comer of First and Branson street . 

January T. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents. 



The Special Organ of "Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co. "—Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 



Price per Copy, 15 Casts.! 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. iy. r >6 



Annual Snbioription (In i old , S1.SO. 



**i~- — -^ /..iiiii-i.-^ ^ 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 27. 



SAN F&ANOISOO, SATOBDAY, FEBEUAE? 3, 18/7. 



No. 2. 






OlIiiM'* of i In- Nnn Frnurlnrn News Totter, Clilua Mail, Cull lor- 
iiIh Hail Bnx< South siiiu Merchant street. No. 607 to (SIS, San Francisco. 

GOLD BARS 880Q900 Silver Bars- 3@12 t? cent. disc. Treasury 
Notes aw Belling ut 95. Buying, 95. Mexican Dollars, par@l 
per cent preiu. Trails Dollars, par (5 1 per cent, prera. 

<S" Exchange on New York. 45-100(5 !, per ceut. for Gold ; Currency, 4J ; 

gtr cent, premium. On London, Bankers, 49$d.; Commercial,, 49Jd. 
aria, 5 franca per dollar. Telegrams, k&i per cent. 

*»* Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 2d, at 3 P.M., 106.}. Latest 
price of Sterling, 484 &®486. 

jO~ Price of Money here, 3(2)1 por cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, i(Etl&. Demand active. 

Latest troru the Merchants' Exchange. — New York, February 
2d, 1076. Gold opened at 105J; 11 a. Iff., at 105J ; 3 p.m., 10.54. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1807, 113 ; 1881, 110&. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 85@4 864, short, Pacific Mail, 24J. Wheat, $L 50@1 65. West- 
ern I'uion, T'"'j}. Hides, dry, 22(522A, quiet. Oil — Sperm, *1 35(5*1 40. 
Winter Bleached, $1 65 (5 1 70. Whale, 70(5/75; Winter Bleached, 
76@85. Wool-Spring, fine, 32@30 ; Burry, 12(5 17 ; Pulled, 25@38. 
Fall Clips, 17@22 ; Burry, 16@22. London', February 2d. — Liverpool 
Wheat Market. 10s. (id. (5 10s. 9d. Club, 10s. 8d.@lls. 3d. United States 
Bonds, 1073. Consols, 95 11-16. 

BUSINESS PUFFS BY THE WAT. 

Under tbiB heading the British Trade Journal, just to hand, makes 
the futf vwing comments on the News Letter: 

" We know of no paper that illustrates more faithfully the peculiar 
vein of humor which ruus through American periodical literature than 
I Mk- San Francisco Newa Letter. In this uniqxie publication, political satire, 
"J.'^j'ir personalities, scoffs at the powers that be, smart generalities. Yan- 
Kee witticisms, and puffs of every shade— from the direct to the oblique — 
find trenchant expression. But full of extravagancies though it be, there 
is an undeniable cleverness about the Navs Letter that covers a multitude 
of sins against good taste. The art of puffery finds in it an original ex- 
p.uieii., as may be judged from the following specimens of the way in 
which it renders the qui ft pro quo. Name? are of course suppressed." 

[Here follows a column of " Notabilia, 1 ' which are every week so pleas- 
ant a feature of this paper, and so useful a medium for advertising.] 

Califtmj!tE3<£ibroad.--PAurs, Jan. 6, 1877: Mrs. S. L. Bee, James 
Bingham, David Bixler, Mrs. David Bixler, Mrs. Bosworth, Mrs. Wm. 
I iogswelL Dr. R. B. Cole, Miss Josie Cole, C. Dorris. Mrs. C. Dorris, H. 
Epstein, Horace Hawes, J. B. Hereford, Mr. Hilltown, Mrs. Hilltown, 
S. L. Simons, San Francisco. London, January 6th, 1877. — Louis 
Dunkelspiel, A. Hoffman, Miss Bella Thomas, San Francisco. Nice, 
January 6th, 1877.— Miss Arner, Mr. Cook, Capt. Kohl, Mrs. Captain 
Kohl, Mrs. Natts, San Francisco. GENEVA, January 6th, 1877-— G. 
Barnett, A. B. Redman, San Francisco. Rome, January 4th, 1877.— 
William and Mrs, Beckman, Sacramento. Naples, January 4th, 
1877. -F. G-. and Mrs. Merchant, Baron Dacier Merchant, San Francisco; 
Charles and Mrs. McCreary, Mrs. G. W. Mowe, Miss Mowe, Mrs. Gen. 
Redington, Miss Redington, Mrs. Mary N. Scudder, Mrs. S. W. Sander- 
son, California. — American Register, January 6, 1877. 

Beerbohm's Telegram. --London and Liverpool, Feb. 2d, 1877. — 
Cargoes on Passage neglected, and no business doing; Mark Lane, in- 
active; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 50s.; California Off Coast, 53s@53s. 6d.; 
do. nearly due, 53s. 6d.; do. just shipped, 55s.; English and French 
Country Markets, cheaper. Liverpool, quiet; California Club, 10s. 9d,@ 
lis. Id.; do. average, 10s. 7d.@10s. 9d.; Red Western Spring, 10s. Id. @ 
10s. 9d. 

Finance. —We have nothing new to report. Money is abundant at 5 
to 6 per cent, against collaterals. Gas has risen to 113J to 114; water to 
106i to 107, with an upward tendency. Silver has declined to 57J pence 
in London. Mexican and Trade Dollars are weak at par to h premium. 
Silver bars are quoted at 3 1 to 4 per cent, discount. 



For Hongkong via Yokohama.— The Pacific Mail steamship Alaska 
sailed yesterday, carrying a very valuable cargo of Quicksilver, mer- 
chandise and treasure. 



Mr. F. Algrnr. No. 8 Clements Lane. London. 1m Authorized to 

receive subscriptions, advertisements, communications, etc., for this paper, 



Published with this tveek's issue an Eight- 
Page Postscript. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF FACT AND THOUGHT. 



The Man Clay Mulcted in Large Damages. —The case of Weske vs. 
Clay has resulted in a verdict against Clay for $15,675 15. The trial 
occupied two days, excited much interest, and was determined by a jury, 
but the Bulletin, which makes a specialty of court business, and knew 
what was floitiy on, has not yet so much as mentioned the case. We are 
informed that two other judgments have been recorded within the past 
few weeks against the man Clay for large amounts, but they, too, have been 
eluded by the Bulletin. That is the way it attempts to carry its friend and 
ally. In the Weske case there were some curious developments, which 
"a Wheeler injunction" declares we must be silent about, however much 
the public may be interested in knowing them. 

Stocks. — The market closed strong for the bonanzas, owing to good 
news from the 1650-foot drift in Con. Virginia. The market generally 
looks well. We have had a quiet week, business having fallen off mate- 
rially compared with last week. The Modoc four-bit dividend knocked 
the price of the stock from $10 to 82 50 per share. The Modoc is one of 
Pierson's favorite mines. J. W. has treated this excellent mine with the 
usual consideration given mines that bave come under his control. All 
are looking for a better market next week, owing to the marked im- 
provement in several of the mines. 

The Mexicau Government through its representative at Washing- 
ton, handed to Hamilton Fish, the Secretary of State, at the stipulated 
hour of the 31st ultimo, $300,000. This is a part of the Joint Claims 
Commission award. The total amount of claims allowed are about 
$4,600,000, payable yearly in the above stated sum. The people of this 
country should be thankful that Sir Edward Thornton was made the 
umpire. 

For New York.— The ship Orient, in the Dispatch Line, carries: 
Borax, 570,900 lbs; beans, 2,000 sks; brandy, 2,800 galls; shingles, 1,000,- 
000; horns, 2,825; lead, 16,231 pigs; copper, 50 tons; iron ore, 630 tons; 
rags, 720 bales; jute rope, 63 bales; pelts, 48 cks; wine, 42,727 galls, etc. 

The properties of Barron Forbes & Co., seized by thePorfirio Diaz 
party, who now assume the affairs of that unhappy land, will probably be 
released ; otherwise serious trouble may ensue. 



Senior Yglesias and suite leave for a port in the State of Guerero, 
Mexico, in a few da} r s, as the prospects for a revulsion in their favor are 
brightening. 

A review of an important treatise condemning vaccination^ by Ed- 
mund Proctor, of Newcastle -on-Tyue, is unavoidably postponed till next 
week. 

"Why not supply the police with hoes and brooms, and let them keep 
the crossings clean, instead of standing on the corners ? 



Brokers are buying Half Dollars at 6|@7 per cent, discount, and are 
selling them at 6£(5j6J per cent, discount. 

A shipment of $4,288 from the Tybo Consolidated on the 27th ult. 
makes $44,249 on January account. 

Supervisor Strother is afraid of the diphtheria now, and will vote for 
cleaning the sewers. 

The coast steamers Senator and George W. Elder will sail for the 
usual ports to-day. 

The British steamer Zealandia is expected to sail to-day for Hono- 
lulu and Sydney. 

Legal Tenders here are irregular at 95£ buying and 95| selling. 

Trade Dollars are quoted in this market at 100 buying and 100A selling. 

Subscribers not receiving' their "News .Letter" regularly will 
please leave word at the office, 609 Merchant street. 



Printed and Pnblished by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California, 



HAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



TOM HOOD'S 

In Brentford town, of old renown, 
There lived a Mister Bray, 

"Who f«U in love with Lucy Bell, 
And so did Mri Clay. 



COMPANIONS. 

But first they sought a friend apiece, 
This pleasant thought to give — 

When they were dead they Btill should 
Two seconds still to live. [have 



To see her ride from Hammersmith To measure out the ground not long 

By all it was allowed, The seconds then forbore, 

Such fair outsides are seldom seen, And having taken one rash step 

Such angels on a cloud. They took a dozen more. 

Said Mf, Bray to Mr. Clay: They next prepared each pistol pan 

"You choose to rival me, [court Against the deadly strife, 
And court Mist) Bell, but there your By putting in the prime of death 

No thoroughfare shall be. Against the prime of life. 

"Unless you how give up your suit, Now all was ready for the foes ; 

You may repent your love j But when they took their stands 

I, who have shot a pigeon match, Fear made them tremble, eo they 

Can ehoot a turtle dove. They both were shaking hands, [found 

" So, pray, before you woo hermore, Said Mr. G. to Mr. B. 



Consider what you do} 
If you pop aught to Lucy Bell, 

111 pop it into you." 
Said Mr. Clay to Mr. Bray: 

" Your threats I quite explode ( 
One who has been a volunteer 

Knows how to prime and load. 
"And so I say to you, unless 

Your passion quiet keeps, 



Here one of us may fall ; 
And like St. Paul's cathedral now, 

Be doomed to have a ball. 
"I do confess I did attach 

Misconduct to your name, 
If I withdraw the charge, will then 

Your ramrod do the same?" 
Said Mr. B. : "I do agree; 

But think of Honor's courts! 



I, who have shot and hit bull's eyes, If we go off without a shot 



May chance to hit a sheep's. 
Now gold is oft for silver changed, 

And that for copper red ; 
But these two went away to give 

Each other change for lead. 



Thero will be strange reports^ 
" Butlook,themorningnowis bright, 

Though cloudy it begun : 
Why can't we aim above, as if 

We had called out the sun V* 



So up into the harmless air 
Their bullets they did send ; 

And may all other duels have 
That upshot in the end. 



-Thomas Mood. 



THE READING OF THE TURKISH CONSTITUTION. 

The Porte is a large building, having a great number of windows, fa- 
cing the square in which the crowd thus waited ; and at about the center 
a kind of logia was fixed, hung with rich scarlet draperies, and embla- 
zoned with the crescent and star. This overlooked tae great mass of the 
people and the old Seraglio, and from it could be seen not only the Stam- 
boul itself, but the Bosphorus, the shores of Asia, and even the Sea of 
Marmora. The day was hazy and damp — else the panorama was of the 
grandest. More than that, it was full of suggestiveness to those to whom 
was the duty of proclaiming the new Constitution of Turkey. Presently 
troops began to file into the courtyard, and line its sides*, . the military 
bands also came and commenced to play Turkish national airs. At 
length, as one o'clock (« la Franca) approached, a large fanfare of trump- 
ets announced the arrival of the Sultan's secretary, who, riding on horse- 
back, and accompanied by a splendid escort, bore the Imperial firman, 
which was enclosed in a magnificent envelope of satin and velvet, richly 
embroidered with gold and studded with diamonds and pearls. Awaiting 
the arrival of this great State document was the Grand Vizier, who, 
standing in the logia in sight of the people, took the envelope, kissed it, 
pressed it to his forehead, and afterward handed it to other great offi- 
cials, who repeated the ceremony, significant of obedience. 

In a loud voice Midhat Pasha then read to the assembled crowd the 
terms of the new Constitution. On the platform temporarily provided 
were all the great civil and military dignitaries of Turkey, the great ec- 
clesiastical chiefs, and the naval officers. Sumptuous costumes in every 
conceivable variety were on every side, from that of the Sheikul-Islam, 
who wore a white mantle embroidered with gold, and .a white turban 
wreathed with cloth of gold, to that of the Jewish Rabbi, who was attired 
in a blue turban embroidered with silver, and those of the Armenian 
priests, who bore the curious head-gear of their nationality, and the still 
stranger veils. Of - the decorations, too, it is impossible to speak, they 
were so numerous, but nearly all wore either the broad red ribbon of the 
Medjidie or the green one of the Osinanli. 

A little while elapsed after the formal reception of the firman which 
was to confer a new Constitution upon the nation, and then the Imam of 
the Porte came forward, and in a grand sonorous voice recited ten pray- 
ers. In the petitions thus offered all appeared to unite, extending their 
arms simultaneously, while the bands joined in the strange chant, and 
gave even greater volume to the deeper amens with which the crowd re- 
sponded. At length there came a prayer for the Sultan, which, couched 
in Arabic, supplicated long life and health for Abdul Haniid; and, this 
being received with loud and emphatie cheers, the bands struck up a 
lively national air once more, while the guns of the batteries firing an- 
nounced to Constantinople that the Constitution had been proclaimed, 
A general salute followed, and then the crowd disbursed, for the rain was 
falling heavily. 

As night came on, the public buildings of the capital were illuminated 
in honor of the event, and a grand torchlight procession went to the pal- 
ace of the Sultan. Everywhere the populace seemed enthusiastic, bands 
played, lights were burned, and Stamboul, with its scores of minarets and 
domes, presented a magnificant appearance. Only one thing tended to 
mar the brilliancy of the scene — the heavy rain which fell, and which 
spoiled in great measure the effect of the strange gathering of costumes 
and faces which assembled on this grand historical occasion. 



A tailor and his son were in the olden days doing- a day's work at a 
farmhouse. The prudent housewife, to secure a good day's work, 
lighted candles when daylight began to fade. The tailor looked to his 
son and said: "Jack, confound them that invented workin' by caunle- 
licht." "Ay," replied young snip, " or daylicht either, father." 



"Grace before meat, " as the young lady remarked when she laced 
herself so tight that she couldn't swallow. 



Hissing is becoming popular in London theaters. 



BANKS. 



SWISS AMERICAN BASK. 

Incorporated in Geueva, Switzerland. Jitunnry 2-itb. 1873. 
Head Office, in Geneva. Capital, $2,000,000. subscribed. $1,000,000 paid 
up. President, HEN'KY HENTSCH. San Francisco Branch, successors to Mossrs. 
Heotsch & Bertou, 5»7 Clay street. Directors : FKAMCIS BERTON and ROBERT 
WATT. 

This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on Europe, and to transact every 
kind of Banking. Mercantile and Exchange Business, and to negotiate American Se- 
curities in Europe. Deposits received. 

Bills of E.vclituij-o on New York, Philadelphia, London, Liverpool, Paris, 
Lyons, Marseilles, Bordeaux, OlOTOn, Brussels, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort, Geneva, 
Lausanne, Chaux-de-Fonds, Neuchatel, Fribourg, Bern, Aarn, Soleure, Baden, Basle, 
Zurich, Winterthur, Shaffhausen, St. Gallen, Lucem, Chur, Eellinzona, Locarno, Lu- 
gano, Mendrisio, Genoa, Turin, Milan, Florence, Rome. 

An Assay Office is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz ores 
and sulphurets. Returns in coin or bars, at the option of the depositor. 

Advances made on bullion and ores. Bust and bullion can be forwarded from any 
part of the country, and returns made through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks. 
[September 1S.1 ^^ 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FiiANCttCO 

Capital ! $5,000,000. 

». O. AIIULS President. | WM. ALVOR»...Vice-Pres»t. 

THOMAS BROWN Cashier. 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfonua ; Boston, Tremont National Bank ; 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
tbe principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antweip, 
Amsterdam, St. Petcrsburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Syd ney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

THE NEVADA JiANK, OF SAN FBANCiSCO. 
Paid Up Capital $10,000,000. 

Louis MeLnne President. | J . €. Flood. .Vice-President. 

>". It. Mas ten Cnshicr. 

Directors :— J. C. Flood, J. W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien-, Jus. G, Fair, LouisMcLane. 

Correspondents :— London— Smith, Payne & Smiths, Paris — Hottinguer & Co. 
Hamburg— Hesse, Newman & Co. New York—" The Bank of New York, N. B. A." 
Chicago — Merchants 1 National Bank. Boston— Second National Bank. New Orleans 
— State Na-tional Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to receive deposits on open account, issue certificates of de- 
posit, buy and sell exchange, purchase bullion, and transact a general banking busi- 
ness. Collections made and proceeds remitted at current rates of exchange. Oct. 9. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, R. <\ Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, George W. Kodinan ; Assistant 
Cashier, W. Ritchie. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolpb Low, Peter 
Donahue, James C. Floud, Edward Martin, James Mo ffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

CokRESi'ONDKNTs— London : Baring Bros. & Co.; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hainburjj : Hesse, 
Neuman &Co. Paris: Hottinguer & Co. NewYork: National Lank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and .Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Pixchange. Dec. 13. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.—- Capital paid up, SI, SO** 
000, with power to increase to $10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office — 5 East India Avenue, London.' Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South Ame r " " d 
Japan — Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and OrientaJ «nfctt&a 
and New Zealand — Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

Dec. 9. W. H. TILLINGHAST. Manager. 

L05C0N AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 

(Capital, ^5,000,000, of which $3,000,000 is fully paid up as 
J present capital. San Francisco Office, 424 California; London Office, 22 Old 
Broad street. President, M. S. LATHAM ; Manager, JAMES M. STKEliTEN ; Assist- 
ant Manager, CA.MILO MARTIN. London Bankers, Bank of England and London 
Joint Stock Bank ; New York Bankers, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston Bankers, 
Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General 
Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said 
cities and all parts of the world. October 23. 



42.2* 



THE ANGLO-CAHFORNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 
California street, San Francisco.--- Loudon Office, 3 

Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, Sti,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buv and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout tbe world. FRED. F. LOW, ) „ 

Oct 4. IGN. STEINHART, f JU - ina g er8 - 

THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital, 95,000. 000.-— Alvinza Ilnyivard. President: R. G. 
Sneath, Vice-President ; H. F. Hastings, Cashier ; R. N. Van Brunt, Secretary. 
Exchange and Telegraphic Trausfers on all principal Cities. Collections made and'a 
general Banking business transacted. August 22. 

SUTRO & CO., 

Bankers and Brokers, 408 Montgomery street.— Highest 
price paid for U. S. Bonds, County Bonds, Scrip, Currency and Foreign Coin. 
Exchange drawn on New .York. May "20 

MONEY TO LOAN. 

John T. Little, Mouey Broker and Real Estate Agent, dis- 
counts notes and loans money on all kinds of collaterals in large amounts ; buys 
and sells real estate. OFFICE : 405£ CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Dec. 25. Opposite Bank of California. 



IVk 8, 1*77. 



CALIF0RN1 \ AH\ ERTISEK. 



B 



DEAD. 

Aowara ftr.'. ill the l'':»ll. 

When Croal Hnd mow i* on r iill. 
i the warble face, ul Sowerl in Goda swift 

Bprinft, 
Hid ih<? violets <>( li i e3 - How fair shall be your QuMaomingl 
Will blnasoni under tranquil >kic«, 

lias, Dear tips, I I day, 

■ , . . . , i j ii 

Dead! and the orate arnnherbreaat itouohtn 

Arerlaeimlin infinite |>eat'e and rait, ••,!!.: lave of mine, whose -1 
\\ hiN- in llu-ir Iml.l a lily M.'. -in t |,j, 

J&htouptbsatWand shadowy room, ,;,„„. ,,, t) ;,. K „ T \,\ ,, f mysteries, 

deaths white mystery awes q |.by, till that world touohes this. 

me >■'. 
Willi torch of gold in eupol mow. "For iosl a little Ume good-bye. 
Dead! .,,,.1 her lips may not unclose f *adow dims the solemn b! 
Baneath my ki~. as does thi i h " 1 ' " '''•' •*"" " f . >'"'."' V : 

I In. ii 

hold ~ v ' 

Whs. roes the bee to woo and win ?' n '':, h ' :,rt ;, ' |t"5 pu with f a ''"• 

The treason that he Ends within, i,", ' m " '" r i" i ! "!' f i 

still lips, dear hands, and peaceful 

Dead! and the heart that thrilled bo "eye. 

much, Your lover breatheBearth'elastgood- 

At whispered word and bender touch bye." 



the rose J V'; 1 " "7/ 11 " "«™ ° V "V W 
I dcU.ii from ..Vr it, heart of gold S" 1 "K^ ■ ■ hrfo * ls „ rt . 
The leave* which such rarsswwtaess l " > im "Heaven, and aUthinga 



A CARLIST CHIEF. 

The Carlist chieftain was tried at Pamueluna, December 20th, ami 

1 ,tt daybreak 0x1 the following day. This man waa lieutenant of 

the * larlisl band c inunanded by the now famona Roea Samaniego, and his 

name, tike that <>t" Ids captain, and of Losano, executed two years since, 

nml the famous Terron, baa long been a byword to strike terror into the 

of the peaceable inhabitants of Ecala, Bstella.and Murieta. The 

murders proved against him number 20 to 25, but the number of which 

uilty may be placed at double that number. tXergoivs career 

ol crime commenced in January, 1873, with an unproved crime. In 

April nf the same year, on the 10th day, he stabbed, for lust of blood, a 

lame old man named Pedro Muneta in the neighborhood id Murieta. 

The old man was a harmless cripple. Every crime was proved in the 

of the trial. On that same day. his hands reeking with blood, he 
met a man called Juan lira, and killed him at once, throwing him over 
a precipice. * hi Baater day of the same year, 1373, he beat to a jelly a 

Jmor tanner of Bstella, and Bung him, half A'-x^, over the precipice of 
On the 28d of dune in the same year he beat to death a little 
boy, by name Felix Chevarri, and threw his body over the precipice of 
Ecala. In the same summer he killed, and threw over the precipice of 
Seals another boy, a day laborer, called Garin. Needless to say, he 
always robbed and despoiled his victims before casting their mangled re- 
mains, semi-conscious, over the abysses where was his haunt. On July 
Sth of the same year he beat to death Hipolito Sanz, casting his remains 
over the same abyss. In fact, the abysses of Iguzquiza and Ecala were 
turned by this man into perfect cemeteries of murdered men's bodies. On 
August 20 of the same year he captured Louis Pesado, close to Estella, 
tortured him one whole day, and killed him the next. It has been said 
by the CarHsts that the victims of this ruffian's club and knife were 
" spies, 1 and, as such, lawful game. Let us see by what follows. It was 
proved in evidence that on the same day, August 20, he outraged two un- 
happy married women, and flung them, half alive, down the precipice of 
Ecala! On the next day, or within two or three days, he robbed an old 
[ tai^mender, aged 7", "i" hia all, killed him, and flung him down the steep 
'"u ^uzquiza. Again, within a few days, he beat to death a gipsy, and 
J' dung bis body down. In Villatuerta, in the same year, he got hold of a 
girl of gentle birth, ravished, and then shot her, throwing her body down 
the precipice. He then commenced the attempt to bury victims alive ; 
when they struggled, he bayoneted them. A string of eight more proved 
crimes of murder, accompanied with every sort of horrid torture, here 
follows. Suffice it to say, that one of these victims, whom he threw 
alive over the precipice, was a Carlist soldier named Eusebio Arrieta, who 
tried to escape from participation in such awful and bloody deeds. 

HARRY MEIGGS' GREAT SCHEME. 

The following is an extract from a Peruvian paper of a late date: 
"The President has promised to sign, within a few days, the proposal 
made by Henry Meigga relative to the prolongation of the Oroya railway 
to the Cerro de Pasco and the drainage of the flooded mines of that dis- 
trict, all to lie performed at the expense of the contractor, who, in re- 
turn, will be entitled to the yield of the mines in question, now aban- 
doned, less ten per cent, of their product, which will be handed over to 
the guild of miners. As the guild itself is unable to incur the very con- 
siderable expense incident to the transportation of the requisite machin- 
ery, etc., to the Cerro de Pasco, Mr. Meiggs having given good guaran- 
tees as to his ability to carry out the undertaking successfully, aad as 
popular opinion is decidedly in favor of the scheme, it will doubtless soon 
be an accomplished fact. Persons who are thoroughly acquainted with 
the mineral wealth of the Cerro assert that in these flooded shafts at 
h-ast $200,000,000 in ore await the fortunate explorer. This may be an 
over estimate, but the sums of money already unsuccessfully expended in 

Sumping apparatus and skilled labor toward the object now proposed by 
ir. Meiggs prove that great results have always been anticipated." 

A New York bookstore has in its window pictures of Hayes and 
Tilden, with these lines from John Byron, who flourished early in the 
eighteenth century: 

"God bles3 the King, I mean the faith's defender, 
God bless — no harm in blessing— the Pretender, 
But who Pretender is, or who is King 1 — ; 
God bless us all, that's quite another thing." 

A fashionably dressed young woman, putting fancy touches to the 
music, was heard singing, " Backward, pin backward, oh, skirts in your 
flight, make me look small again, just for to-night." 

You never heard of an Old Man's Christian Association. 



HARD DRINKERS. 
A singular instance <d the power of absorbing liquor was lately 
brought t-. light at a Lobd< rt Three Britons and 01 a 

I drank at a single sitting, two champagne cups, nine bottl 

champagne, thirtrj ..f brandy, > 

mi.- bottles of -.-la. a single bottle "f very old brand; , end fchey smoked 
I '11 the day following th< I party 

again assembled, and drank nineteen large ami thirty two small gla 
brandy, one botUe of oM brandy, one bottle of ohablis, *i\ bottles of 
champagne, nml as many champagne cups. Numerous dgai 
smoked on this occasion, but no Inventory was taken thereof, Thi 
nf this joyous sacrifice t" Bacchus, twice repeated, was asserted b 
Deen a conspiracy on the part of three of the revelers to obtain the Big 
nature of the fourth to a oill of exchange for £500. Tin- bill appears t-> 
have '"''-ii signed and put into circulation, and hence theproceedli 
fore the London police court. The signer of the bill, a certain LeHunt 
Doyle, i- tin- possessor of £3,000 per annum, and it came out in the '".i 
denes that one «>f the jubilant conspirators had do tared his intention t-i 
suek it all out of the hard drinking Doyle. The servant of Doyle stated 
that his master was never sober, ami that as soon as he had slept off the 
effects of one drinking-bout he called for "a split." that is, soda-water 
ami brandy, and recommenced his bibulous practice. The circumstance 
is only worth remarking as testifying to the fact that the race of hard 
drinkers in Great Britain is not yet extinct. In the time of James II. 
hard drinking was very common among the upper classes of English soci- 
ety. It is even stated that Jeffries, when Lord High Chancellor, ran 
about the Strand in a state of nature after a nights carouse with some of 
Ins subordinate judges. But times have changed during the reign of 
0.ueeii A ictoria, and judges drink no more, but fine those who continue 
to imbibe a superfluity of liquor. 

George Francis Train says he has "sunk his egotism in the tiniver- 
sal." >inthing short of the universal would hold it. 

SAVINGS AND LOAN. 

COLLATERAL LOAN AND SAVINGS BANE, CORNER POST AND 
KEARNY STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Incorporated Under the Laws of the State of California. 

President ...J. S. SPEAR, JR. 1 Secretary F.S.CARTER. 

Vice-President ROB'T STEVENSON. | Appraiser GEO. O. ECKER. 

This Bank is prepared to loan money upon collateral secu- 
rities, such as Uonds, Stocks, Savings bank Books, Diamonds, Warehouse Re- 
ceipts, etc., at from 1J to 4 per cent, per month. The Bank will also receive Term 
Deposits, and allow the following rates of interest : Term Deposits of six months, 
1 per cent, per month ; Twelve months, 11 per cent, per month. 
November 4. F. S. CARTER, Secretary. 

GERMAN SAVIN33 AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Guarantee Capital 8200, OOO. —Office 526 California street. 
North side, between Montgomery and Kearny streets. Olfiee hours, from 9 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. Extra hour on Saturdays from 7 to 8 P.M, for receiving of Deposits only 
Loans made on Real Estate and other collateral securities, at current rates of interest. 
President L. GOTTIG. | Secretary GEO. LETTE. 

DIRECTORS. 

F. Roeding, H. Schmieden, Chas. Kobler, Ed. Kruse, Dan. Meyer, George H. Eg- 
gers, P. Spreckles, N. Van Bergen. Feb. 1. 

MARKET S f REET BANK OF SAVINGS, 
634 Market St., Opposite Palace Hotel. 

President THOMAS B. LEWIS. 

Secretary W.E. LATSON. 

Interest alloweil 011 all deposits remaining; in Bank over 
thirty days. Interest on term deposits, 12 per cent, per annum. Dejiosits re- 
ceived from one dollar upward. No charge for Bank Book. On receipt of remit- 
tances from the interior, Bank Books or Certificates of Deposit will be forwarded or 
delivered to agent. Bank open oa Saturdays till 9 o'clock p.m. October 28. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 
*T»Jb> California street, corner Webb. Capital and Re- 
pJ*J -*C serve, £-J:U,000. Deposits, £6\ 919,000. Directors: James de Fremery, 
President ; Albert Miller, Viee-President ; C. Adolphe Low, D. J. Oliver, Charles 
Bauin, Charles Pace, Washington Bartlett, A. Campbell, Sen., George C. Potter ; 
Cashier, Lovell White. Dividends for two years past have been 7A and 9 per cent, re- 
spectively, on ordinary and term deposits. Dividends are payable semi-annually, in 
January "and July. Money loaned on real estate and on United States Bonds, or 
eq uivalent securities. October 30. 

PIONEER LAND AND LOAN BANK OF SAVINGS AND DEPOSIT. 

Sonthcast corner California and Montgomery streets, Safe 
Deposit Block. Incoriiorated IS'59. Guarantee Fund, $200,000. Dividend No. 
102 payable on December 5th. Ordinary deposits receive 9 per cent. Term de- 
posits receive 12 per cent. This incorporation is in its eighth year, and refer* to 
over 4,900 depositors for its successful and economical management. 

H. KOFAHL, Cashier. 
Tuos. Gray, President. J. C. Dcnxax, Secretary. March -11 

MASONIC SAVINGS AND 10AN BANK, 

No. 6 Post street. Masonic Temple. San Francisco, Cal.— 
Moneys received on Term and Ordinary Deposits ; dividends paid semi- 
annually ; loans made on approved security. This bank solicits the patronage of all 
persons. [March 25.J H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary. w - S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 

Francisco. O ct - 14 - 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bnsh street, above Kearny, O. Mahe, Director. Loans 
made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



411 



SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and California Sts. 

CAPITAL 82,000.000. 

This Company is now open for the renting- of vaults and tbe 
transaction of all business connected with a Safe Depository. Pamphlets giving 
full information and rates can be obtained at the office of the Company. Hours, 
from 8a.m. to 6 p.m. September 18. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



HIS SAT. MAJESTY, FROM MARRIOTT'S AEROPLANE, DROPS A 

TEAR, AND ADDRESSES THE "NEWS LET1ER 

CONTRIBUTOR." 

"What splendid fun, ballooning ! such a rushing, reckless pace ! 

Where's some lusty little cherub now ? I'd like to have a race ! t 

There ! Port your helm ! So ! Gently. Let's rest a while from flying, 

And gaze in sad reflection on the city 'neath us lying. 

How small it seems ! Mere nothing ! A tiny little speck ! 

Hold on, old man ! you're dizzy: take care ! you'll break your neck I 

This rain's a cursed nuisance ! We'll get a frightful soaking. 

Bad luck to Deacon Fitch, I say, who, with his psalms and croaking, 

Has been praying for a week or more for the Lord to send us rain, 

As if the Almighty cared a fig for all old Fitch's prayin' ! 

So Piper's got his monkey up ? and swears the count's a fraud ! 

'Cause " Honest Davis" spent more cash than he could well afford ! 

Tho' " who will pay the Piper" now to investigate the facts, 

I suppose will be decided by another city tax ! 

But who's this Captain Douglass? this mentor? did you hear? 

Who objects to ladies fiddling and to Germans drinking beer ! 

The Tivoli's surely harmless; but if he wants a name, 

There's the " Olive Branch," or " ScottyV place, of very different fame. 

This " Crooked whisky" business seems all the "go" of late, 

Tho', like Judge Hoffman, I prefer to take my whisky straight. 

I like a " nip" myself, you bet ! but then it's on the square; 

No "nightly nippers," please, in mine ! the thought I cannot bear ! 

Franconi's done his best, 'tis true, but the evidence is crushing, 

And I think, as " Billy F." would say, it's all V. P. with Cushing ! 

You're lucky, tho', in one respect, that Thistleton's in quod ! 

You'd be luckier still if only he was safe beneath the sod ! 

That blackguard sort of howling; that sacrilegious wail, 

Believe me, sounds much better in some dismal city jail ! 

There's another, too, that Post man, and the Bulletin, his mate, 

If they continue in their lying will meet no other fate. 

! what a curse is money!— at least that's what they say. 
For faith ! it is but little coin that ever comes my way. 
There's Hart and Harris, brokers, have broke a judge's heart, 
And "han-is'd" him to death almost by playing him too smart. 
Then Johnny Patrick! Look at him! That check'll raise a storm; 
He'll have to get! He can't stay here! He'll find the place too warm. 
How soon before election comes? A change is good you know. 
Those "Bromley bills" might then be paid, and the Co.'s purse is low. 
'Twixt pavements, sewers and basalt blocks, poor Strother s nearly mad, 
And Eaton's "chain gang on the brain" will soon make him as bad. 

1 wish you'd tell one thing I can't get through my head: 
What's up with all your married folks, or why thy e'er get wed 1 
For from "cruelty" or "bigamy," or both, or other source, 

One scarce has heard they're married, when they're suing for divorce. 

" Matches made in Heaven" may sound uncommon well; 

But it seems to me in Frisco they must be made in Hell! 

Else why this scandal? What's the cause? There must be something bad. 

It's no joking matter, I assure you, when it makes a devil sad ! 

If I could only stop awhile, we'd quite reform the town. 

What say you though? It's getting late! Let's gently wander down. 

We'll soon be reaching Heaven! The distance isn't great; 

And what do you think old Peter 'd say to the devil at his gate 1 

Here's terra firma, once again. Let's celebrate our trip! 

And tackle Gibbs'! He's close at hand! I'm dying for a nip ! 

Gibbs can't be beat for cocktails. His brimstone's hot and strong. 

But " Frank's" for toddies! In that line my judgment's never wrong! 

Once more, old man! Good bye, then! I must hurry up and go, 

Those imps 'U play old Harry with the whole concern below! 

Last time I stayed too late here. They're had all grown cold. 

No roasting! but a general drunk, and no one there to scold. 

A LONG STRIDE IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION. 
We call special attention to our medical directory published with 
this issue of the News Letter. In it will be found the names and qualifi- 
cations of the different practitioners who, up to date, have obtained li- 
censes from the three different boards thatwere authorized to grant the same. 
These men are now the only persons entitled, under the law recently 
passed,' to practice medicine or surgery within this city. All others are 
quacks and pretenders, who may be summarily dealt with in the Police 
Court if they attempt to practice. The law ought to be put in motion 
forthwith. The dangerous, advertising, death-dealing crowd ought to be 
shut up, or sent to jail without delay. A properly organized effort in 
that direction should be set on foot at once. There ought to be no ques- 
tion as to whose duty it is to see that means are provided for carrying out 
the law. The recognized medical societies ought to have no hesitation 
about the matter. We refer them to a paragraph in another column, 
taken from an English exchange, which shows the exact modus operandi 
by which the medical men of Birmingham accomplished an exactly simi- 
lar duty. We look upon the law that is now in force as a long stride in 
the right direction. It recognizes the duty of regulating the practice of 
the profession, and for the first time it puts the worst class of quacks out- 
side the pale of legality. The classification is loose enough in all con- 
science. Many men are admitted who ought to have been excluded, but 
none are out, who ought to be in, and perhaps this is the best that could 
be done at the first attempt. As the State grows in population, know- 
ledge, and wisdom, more may be accomplished. As it is, the qualifica- 
tions are distinctby given in our directory, from which the public can se- 
lect their physicians from among those possessing diplomas from Euro- 
pean or American colleges of undoubted merit. We congratulate our 
readers, and ourselves, upon this result, to a fight undertaken and main- 
tained by the News Letter single-handed. Whilst the Bulletin and Call 
have made thousands upon thousands of dollars out of the advertisement 
of the quacks, we have spent thousands to end this wicked portion of 
their business, and to put their rascally customers where they ought to be 
— in jail. With what success, everybody knows. 

The Chinese ' ' physicians! " are, up to this moment, plying their vil- 
lainous compounds on the demented whites who have the coin to pay 
them. Lipotai, who, we understand, formerly toiled as a fisherman, has 
amassed wealth in that sphere. The United States is the only known 
country on the civilized globe where such rascality is allowed. What are 
the Medical Societies doing ? 



THEATRICAL, ETC. 

Grand Opera House. —The bill this week has chiefly consisted of the 
comedy A Wonderful Woman, by Dance, and a burlesque of Chilperic. The 
former is a most charmingly written trifle in two acts, and was given by 
Manager Wheatleigh's company in capital style. Mr. Lingham in the 
" Marquis," possessed a role of great opportunities, of which, however, he 
availed himself only moderately. He carried his semblance of airy im- 
perturbability to the verge of becoming stilted, but in other respects gave 
an excellent idea of character. Miss Carey and Mr. Polk both did admir- 
ably; the latter's "Cobbler" being as well rounded and intrinsically 
complete a performance as one could well desire to see. Chilperic we can- 
not applaud as a success. Containing some very nice little songs, and 
some novel effects, such as the umbrella dance, it is, notwithstanding, an 
unattractive piece. The relegation of Miss Jennie Beauclerc into her 
normal petticoats simply, went to show that Mrs. Oates had more than a 
rival in hoodlumism. Her sister had a better chance in her peculiar line. 
Obviously, these young ladies thrive best under their native fig leaves. 
Round Uie World in Eighty Days is being prepared with great expense, 
and much elaboration of detail. The indefatigable Voegtlin is at work 
day and night on unlimited new scenery. It takes the boards on Monday 
next, when the big theater will be all too small to hold the audience. 
Verne's famous Tour has been a success everywhere. 

California Theater. —Mr. Sothern Dundreary, or Dundreary Sothern, 
as the reader prefers, changed the bill on Thursday night t-> The Hornet's 
Nest. We caunot altogethtr flatter the star upon his new piece, or his 
new role. The former is a remarkably thin farce, stretched by main 
force over four acts, and the latter is more like a reminiscence of " Dun- 
dreary" than anything else. The plot of the new piece is the old story 
of a pretended fool, lived on by a motley collection of sharpers, and turn- 
ing out to be a combination of " Guy Livingston " and "Solomon " in the 
last act. The characters, and the piece itself, are forced with very ap- 
parent effort to give scope to a deluge of "gags" and plays upon words, 
and in this respect especially are as unnatural as may be. The puns are 
not always first chop, either. Mr. Sothern is often very funny in a way 
that instantly recalls " my Lord," and has one bit of very genuine and 
now-a-days sort of sentiment in his scene with Miss Wilton in the last 
act. The other parts are more varied than noticeable. Mr. Edwards, as 
the bombastic and bibulous old officer, being the most amusing of the lot, 
Mr. Bishop and Mr. Mestayer doing the best possible with small material. 
In brief, the new comedy is simply a wild absurdity, and worth seeing in 
the sense that any curiosity is, but will hardly do much to extend Mr. 
Sothern's renown. An early production of Home may be looked for. 

Academy of Music. — Manager Maguire opens the doors of this beau- 
tiful house again on Monday, with a new play, -4?/ for Cold, especially 
written for the lilipution star, Zoe Tnttle. Every one will remember this 
real little artist's hit as " Prince John." We predict a good business for 
the prodigy, and her veteran supporters. 

' ' Yours in all sincerity, A Christian, " from Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan- 
uary 7, 1877, will pardon our delay in noticing his very bright and kind 
notice of the News Letter, as he states he is one who regularly reads it and 
says so much in denunciation of "rogues, thieves and hypocrites." 
Our friend will not forget that the best locomotives do once now and then 
run off the track, and that straight lines are best for us all. If our Chris- 
tian friend will favor us with his private address we shaU have great 
pleasure in hearing from him not necessarily for his amiable ef- 
fusions to appear in print. 



Private Cuve"e are Hellmann Brothers & 



"The 'Wolf at the Boor." — Under this heading an occasional con- 
tributor sends us the following remarks: " Many of our good citizens 
would be surprised to know of the literal poverty, the actual hunger :>nd 
want of comfortable clothing among a class of our citizens who never 
fore have been without all the comforts and even the elegancies of lit*,. 
Ladies, the widows and children of old pioneers who occupied the high- 
est social position in California ten or twenty years since, have been to 
the Benevolent Association's rooms asking for bread within the past 
week. Think of that, ye rich pioneers! " 

The sole agents for Kru^ 
Co., 525 Front street. 

BALDWIN'S ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

Market street, between Stocktou ami Powell. --Commenc- 
ing Saturday, February 3d, and every evening of the following week, the Lit- 
tle California Favorite, ZOE TUTTLE.in a New and Original Drama, in Five Acts, by 
John D. Graham, Esq., of this city, entitled ALL FOR GOLD ! Supported by the 
popular young actor, MR. M. H.BROWN, as "Caleb Cobb" and " Prof. Pogue." 
All the ladies must see it ! All the children must see it ! New and Effective Scenery 
by Genrge W. Dayton. New and Original Music by George F. Evans. Elegant Stage 
Fittings by John D. Sherman. Box office open for the sale of seats on Monday, Janu- 
ary 29th. Grand Sunday Performance on Sunday, February 4th. Feb. 3. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Mission street, between Third ami Fourth.--- Acting: Man- 
ager, Mr. Chas. Wheatleigh ; Scenic Artist, Mr. Wm. Voegtlin. This Eve- 
ning, February 3d, positively last appearance of the popular and accomplished 
BEAUCLKRC SISTERS ! The successful operatic extravaganza, CHILPERIC ! Pre- 
ceded by the comic drama, A WONDERFUL WOMAN ! Matinee to-morrow at two 
o'clock P.M. Monday, February ftth, with new scenery (by Voegtlin) and elaborate 
appointments, THE TOUR OF THE WORLD IN EIGHTY DAYS, by Jules Verne. 
The grandest production ever witnessed in California. Box Office now open for sale 
of reserved scats. Feb. 3. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Bush street, above Kearny.— .John McCnllongh. Proprietor 
and Manager; Barton Hill, Acting Manager. Second week of MR. SOTH- 
ERN. This (Saturday) Evening, February 3d, and every evening until further no- 
tice, and at the Saturdav Matinee, first production in this city of a new and original 
farcical comedy, entitled A HORNET'S NEST ! IN THREE BUZZES AND A 
STINGER ! Written specially for Mr. Sothern by H. J. Byron, Esq., author of "Our 
Boys," etc. Appropriate Scenic Illustrations. "Sydney Spoonbill." E. A. Sothern. 

NEW BELLA UNION THEATER. 

Kearny street, between Washington ami Jackson.— Samuel 
Tetlow, Proprietor, CHARLEY REED, Ethiopian Comedian, Character Ar- 
tist and Stump Speech Orator. THE WYMANS. ALFRED and LULU, Specialty and 
Sketch Artists. CARRIE LE.">N and SAM SWAIN, the Celebrated Acrobatic Song 
and Dance Artists. SHED LkCLAIR, the Great Flving Trapeze Artist. MADGE 
AISTON, Song and Dance Artist. EDWARD GLOVER, the Celebrated Australian 
Comic Singer. The Great Double Company in Comedy, Farce and Drama. Feb. 3. 



1V1.. 8, 1877.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PARACRAPH IAN A. 
Pro Bono Publico. 



Grest Red Estate Sale. At Platt'a II .11. M »nday, i 

. mill the fori ■! i lobb 

:■'. ndj I City Gartl 

Into 100 lota. Thii property m within 3,800 foot of the New City II.,il. 

an>l within 3,800 yards Prom the P*hun Hotel, and reached by five tin is 

one ••! th in passing io front ot the property every five 

minute* of the day. Term* the most liberal ever offered in this city or 

i follow ii Twenty per oent nab, in L'. 3. guld uoin, the balance 

In eight equal yearly payments, to bear interest at the rate of 7'. per 

cut. perannum t tlie aeierred payments to be Bocured by mortgage. To 

oirin ■ to pay .ill oasfa a deduction of one years interest, or 1\ 

percent*, will be made "n deferred paymentai 

N. l'.. Maps, diagrams and catalogues, as well as all information re- 

S inline this fine estate, can be obtained at offios, No, 410 Pine street, 
evade Block. The galleries of Piatt's Hall will be reserved for Indies 
wishing t<> attend the sale. 

o> this Pbopbbty Pibpbct. Living water Running through 
the sewers In tin- driest seasons, thus precluding the necessity <»t Sashing. 
This and the positive absence of Summer fogs, the property being located 
in the sunny belt, ensures a healthy neighborhood. 

■ i .•. M Tula property is surrounded and intersected by five 
great thoroughfares -three ox them B0 feet and over wide. No narrow 
uor aUi \ way,- tn breed epidemical diseases. 
Location and Gradb. -Within walking distance of all the business 
parte of this city, and has been graded to n Little above the highest official 
grade, and the neighboring property i? uow undergoing a more startling 
oharure and desirable improvement than any other part of the city. 

[MVESTtfBNT. No property within the city (from its central location) 
commends itself more advantageously to buyers, whether for residence or 
speculation, than this. The sale is positive. The terms, as above, so 
very easy that it is brought within the reach nf all. 

' ' Geo. Francia Train's Paper. "—We have received the first number 
Of "Geo. Francis Train's Paper" — for such is its title -a neatly printed 
Bight-page weekly, of rather small dimensions. It is to be published for 
the benefit of -Mrs. Lant and her family, who are asserted to be left desti- 
tute by the committal to jail or the father, as a penalty for printing 
Train's prayer for Henry Ward Beecher in the Toledo .Sun. Geo. Francis 
still sits, like Diogenes, in his tub; and in despair at finding an honest 
man, has blown out his lantern and taken to howling anathemas at all 
mankind through the bung-hole. The rain of his execrations falls alike 
upon the just and the unjust, though we are inclined to think the latter 
are in the majority. Hia views, on the innumerable topics of the day, 
are given in imaginary dialogues with a mythical editor. They are cer- 
tainlv original, and are stated in language which it cannot be denied is 
most brilliant and striking. He calls his ideas " psychologic evolutions," 
and whatever may be their real value it is well worth any man's while to 
pay one dollar a year (the price of the paper) for the diversion of reading 
them. 

Steve Massett— Twenty -six years ago, as the proprietor of the News 
Letter was coming down from the Yuba river with a few ounces of gold 
in a glass bottle, he first made the acquaintance of Steve Massett, the 
ever bright and genial deems Pipes, of 1'ipesville. tn fact, Mr. Massett 
converted our dust into coin of the realm, and, as far as we remember, 
was a remarkably honest broker. He is now in Los Angeles, making a 
little tour of the southern country, and will presumably give a few nf his 
choice drawing-room entertainments while there. His repertoire is much 
larger since his visit to Europe, his voice as sweet as ever, and his powers 
'" u' mimicry and pathos unabated. We sincerely wish Mr. Massett a 
pleasant and profitable southern trip. 

Madrona. — We have just received from Roman & Co. a volume en- 
titled " Madrona," which has proved a veritable surprise to us. A story 
more interesting and more neatly told in poetry — more subtle or refined — 
we have never met in any other author. Indeed, the wonder is that any 
man who could write BUCh a beautiful work should never have published 
before. "Calderon," which f illows, is a drama of intense Interest, abound- 
ing in exciting scenes and telling' points, and is characterized by the same 
exquisite language as " Madrona. ' Both works are certainly remarkable, 
deserving to rank high in romantic and classical literature, and evince, on 
the part of the author, the rarest quality of genius. 

In these days of adulterated liquors, when druggists manufacture 
their own brandy and whisky, and wine merchants fill up their spare time 
in mixing Sonoma wine with French claret, and labeling it Chateau 
Lafitte, it is of great importance to know where to go for good wines and 
spirits. Mr. John Butler, of No. 7 Sutter street, and 506 Market street, 
carries on one of the few houses in the liquor trade which is entirely free 
from all suspicion of keeping mixed or adulterated goods. His specialty 
perhaps is fine old sherry; but be keeps a full line of the purest wines, 
liquprs, ales and porters to be found in the city. 

Dr. Jessup has made a new departure in dentistry which will be ser- 
viceable in giving a new lease of life to many a worn out old grinder. By 
a system of his own he affixes a gold crown to the stump, thereby render- 
ing it serviceable for mastication and preserving it to its owner. Dr. 
Jessup says he can apply this crown to the veriest remnant of a tooth 
so to lender it as good as ever for all practical purposes. 

A Cincinnati man told his tailor that he wouldn't pay for " that last 
epilepsy." It was discovered that he meant '"bad fit." There is no 
epilepsy about the fit of J. M. Litchfield & Co.'s clothes. They keep the 
most stylish garments in the city. Their place of business is on the corner 
of Washington and Sansome streets. 



St John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. — The Rev. Win. A. Scott, O. D., pastor, will preach Sunday at 
11 A. M. and 7a P. M. The public very cordially invited to attend. 



J. M. Litchfield & Co., the ( 'nobby , 'tailors, cornerof Washington and 
Sansome streets. 



SIGNAL SERVICE METEOROLOGICAL REPORT. WEEa 
fiNDING FEB. 1, 1877, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Hill ft i- at "»"' Lint-tut liu rumvtrr. 



Frl. 20. 


Silt. ^7. 


Sun 28. [ Mon. 2a 


Tuos 30 


Wed 31 


Tin 1. 


30. 14 


80 0:1 


, 


.in 18 


SO. 'I 


30.17 




-ii 


10.70 | 29.08 


90.00 


80.00 






Muj-imum "nil Minimum Tlir-i-mimi- l< <•. 




60 


01 


60 1 OS M 


h: 


ii:. 


IB 


49 


.VI 88 


M 


87 


S3 


72 


T<: | 80 | 
I'yrfiiillii!/ Willi!. 


00 | 


87 


SW. 1 


SK. | 


SK. | S. | SK. | 

M i>ut--MUm Travehsdi 


N. | 


SW. 


03 


7(3 | 


1SI | 280 | IM | 
Stale uf Wenllur. 


113 | 


108 


Fiiir. | 


Fair. 


K:nuy. j Rainy. I 


Bainjr. 1 


Rainy. | 


Cloudy. 



I 



llalnfall in TweHty-four Hours. 

| .44 | .02 | 1.68 | .08 



Total Rat n Jiuriny Season hry'tnnimj >Tu\y 1, JS70.. 



| .33 
B.66 inches. 



SANITARY NOTES. 

One hundred and fifty-nine deaths occurred this week as compared 
with 135 last. The mortality is nearly double that of the corresponding 
week last year, and is the highest yet registered in San Francisco. There 
were 1)8 males and Gl females. Fifty-six were under 5 years of age, 22 
between 5 and 20, 71 between 20 and 00 years, and 10 over that age. 
Only 2 persons died of old age; of zymotic diseases the deaths were: 32 
diphtheria, 18 small-pox, 3 typhoid fever, 3 scarlatina, and 1 whooping- 
cough. It would thus appear that 57 persons died of preventable dis- 
eases, the 32 diphtheria and 3 typhoid fever being directly due to tilth, 
and the 18 small-pox to neglected vaccination. One person died of apo- 
plexy and 3 of brain disease. The mortality from diseases of the respira- 
tory organs continues excessive notwithstanding the warm and damp 
atmosphere. There were 21 deaths from consumption, 11 from pneumo- 
nia, 1 congestion of the lungs, and 3 croup. It is remarkable that bron- 
chitis is rarely fatal in comparison with other forms of lung disease. 
There were three deaths from inflammation of the stomach and bowels 
and 4 from heart disease; 3 from liver diseases, 1 from rheumatism and 3 
from cancer; there were 4 accidental deaths and 3 suicides. Small- pox 
continues to prevail. The deaths were 20 as compared with 14 last week. 
Thirty fresh cases have been reported. We have reason to believe that 
the disease has been occasionally propagated by inoculation. A whole 
family got the disease in this way, and as there were only a few pocks 
they ran about the streets unchecked; nay, they even went to be vacci- 
nated at the public vaccination office. Surely it is desirable that the 
propagation of small-pox by inoculation should be put down by procla- 
mation and punishment. 

The rain has not exerted any beneficial influence on diphtheria; 31 
deaths have occurred, as compared with 21 last week. 

The rain has continued to fall, and it is to lie hoped that some of the sew- 
ers have been cleansed out. We doubt, however, if the quantity has been 
sufficient to flush the lower levels of the city. The lakes of water and 
sludge attest the existence of an almost insurmountable obstacle to nat- 
ural drainage. In Montgomery street we saw the city officials removing 
the sludge from the gully holes which was put into them last week. The 
city will find this a profitable operation. It seems a most righteous thing 
to expect the Spring Valley to wash out sewers systematically filled up by 
the public scavengers, and to perform the herculean task of Hushing level 
Bewers, which fill up as soon as the stream is turned off. When the Su- 
pervisors have water works of their own, it is to be hoped they will put 
them to a better purpose. 

The neatest suits in the city at J. M. Litchfield & Co.'s 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO- 

(ilt.VIH VIKI) PRICES. 

EoomBwith Board $3 per Day 

Booms with Board ... $4 perEey 

Rooms w.thout Board SI per Day 

And Upwards 
Fob. 3. WARREN tlt.VM), Lessee. 

MAURICE DORE & CO., AUCTIONEERS. 

HA. Col»b, Auctioneer. —Special Great Real Estate Sale, 
a at Piatt's Hall, Montgomery street, on MONDAY, February 12th, 1877, at 12 
Noun. We will sell, on the most liberal terms ever offered in this City "r State, FOUR 
ENTIRE BLOCKS OF LAND, bounded by FoUmi, Harrison, Twelfth, Thirteenth 
and Fourteenth streets, well known as the CITY GARDENS, Subdivided into 100 
Lartje building Lota. Feb. 3. 

0D0RLTSS 

Excavating Apparatus Company of San Francisco.—Enipty- 
injj Vaults, Sinks, Cesspools, Sewers, Cellars, Wells and Excavations in the day- 
time without offence. Orders left at the following places will receive prompt atten- 
tion: Madison & Burke's, corner Sacramento and Montgomery streets; Office Super- 
intendent uf Streets, City Hall; Office, U12 Commercial street, or addressed to Presi- 
d ent, Post Office box 10, City. Feb. ?. 

W. Morris. Jos. Schwab. J, F. Kennedy. 

MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO, 

Importers and Dealers In Moldings. Frames, Engravings, 
Chromos, Lithographs, Decalcomanie, Wax and Artists' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

ARTIFICIAL TEETH, 

Beautiful Celluloid Plates made by Dr. Jessup, corner 
Sutter and Montgomery streets, at §20 a set; are far superior to vulcanite rub- 
ber, and the color of the natural gnini. Feb. 3. 

STUART S. WRIGHT, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, Sty. 504 Kearny street, 
San Francisco, California. Feb. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



COLUMN FOR THE CURIOUS, 

In Nature, Science, and Art. 

Talking by Telegraph. —On Sunday, November 2(3th, Prof. A. Gra- 
ham Bell experimented with the " telephone " on the wires of the Eastern 
Railroad Company between Boston and Salem. Prof. Bell was assisted 
at the Boston end of the line by two operators, and Mr. Thomas A. Wat- 
son by one operator at the Salem end. According to the account pub- 
lished in the Commonwealth of Boston, conversation was carried on with 
Mr. Watson at Salem, by all those present, in turn, without any diffi- 
culty, even the voices of the speakers being easily recognized. Whisper- 
ing was found to be perfectly audible, but was unintelligible. After a 
time, instead of grounding the wire at Salem, it was connected with 
North Conway, a distance of one hundred and forty-three miles from Bos- 
ton, thus leaving Salem as a way-station. After this change had been 
made there was a slight diminution in the loudness of the tones, but no 
difficulty was experienced in carryiug on conversation. Another change 
was made, whereby the electrical current was sent to Portland and back 
by another line to Salem, thus making Salem a terminal station at the end 
of nearly two hundred miles of wire. The result of this change was, 
that the tones of the speakers could be heard, but so faintly as to be un- 
intelligible. With electro-magnets of a higher resistance, Prof. Bell is 
confident that the sounds would have been perfectly intelligible, the mag- 
nets used, it must be recollected, being only intended for a twenty-mile 
circuit. 

The Scotsman gives a review of the work done in the ship-building 
yards on the Clyde during the past year. The total amount of tonnage 
launched— 204, 770 tons— is under that of last year by 23,430, and is 61.000 
tons below the aggregate for 1874, and 56,700 tons below that for 1S75, 
but, considering the general dullness of trade, the result is not considered 
altogether unsatisfactory. The number of vessels launched was 266 
against 276 in 1875, 225 in 1874, and 194 in 1873. Perhaps the most 
marked feature of the trade during the year has been the continued de- 
crease in the number and size of the steam-vessels turned out, their place 
being taken by iron sailing-ships, which, for the first time for many years, 
exceed in tonnage as well as numbers the screw-steamers launched. The 
change that has taken place in this respect since the great decline in the 
iron and coal trades is brought out in a comparison of the figures of 1S73 
with those of the present year. While in the former 125 screw-steamers 
of 218,000 tons in the aggregate were built, only 83 vessels of this class, of 
73,000 tons in all, were turned out. On the other hand, the 12 iron sail- 
ing ships of 1873, aggregating 19,000 tons, had increased in 1876 to 97 ves- 
sels of 96,000 tons. Among the vessels launched this year were four war 
vessels for the British Government. There is at present a fair amount of 
work in hand at the various yards. - • 

The Berlin Gorilla.— At a recent meeting of the German Association 
of Naturalists, I>r. Hermes, as we are informed by Nature, described 
some interesting characteristics of the young gorilla in the Berlin Aqua- 
rium. He nods and claps his hands to visitors; wakes up like a man and 
stretches himself. His keeper must always be beside him and eat with 
him ; he eats what his keeper eats ; they share dinner and supper ; the 
keeper must remain by him till he goes to sleep, his sleep lasting eight 
hours. His easy life has increased his weight in a few months from 
thirty-one to thirty-seven pounds. For some weeks he had inflammation 
of the lungs, when his old friend Dr. Falhenstein was fetched, who 
treated him with quinine and Ems water, which made him better. When 
Dr. Hermes left the gorilla on the previous Sunday, the latter showed the 
doctor his tongue, clapped his hands, and squeezed the hand of the doc- 
tor as an indication, the latter believed, of his recovery. For Pungu, as 
the gorilla is called, a large plate-glass palace has been erected in the 
aquarium in connection with the palm-house. 

How to Cook a Trout at the River Side. —Kindle a fire of dry 
wood ; take your fish when just out of the water, or from your creel, roll 
him up in some damp clay, then lay the fish among the embers of your 
fire ; when the clay presents a white color, which generally occurs when 
it has got thoroughly hard and cracked, the trout is properly done, and a 
slight blow will easily remove the clay, aud display to the hungry angler 
a delicious meal. Wandering tribes of gypsies frequently may be seen 
cooking various dishes in the above manner. The fish, I may observe, 
must not be cut open and cleaned' During the firing process the intes- 
tines and other impurities will draw togetter, and not in tne slightest de- 
gree injure the trout. In the absence of clay, paper may be used. Two 
or three folds of old newspaper rolled round the fish, the ends being 
twisted together, the whole being completely soaked iu water and placed 
on the fire until well charred, will answer the same purpose. Salt will 
improve the flavor of your trout. — James Armstrong's Treatise on Fishing, 

Lightning in a Telegraph-office. — A telegraph-operator, in an office 
on the Boston and Providence Railroad, was lately killed by lightning. 
This is said to be the only case on record of an operator killed by light- 
ning while in the office. Remarking*upon this casualty, the Telegraphic 
Jouriml says that "so far from being a source of danger, the electric tele- 
graph must be regarded rather as a cause of safety, as a network of lines 
spread over a country tends to prevent an accumulation of electricity at 
any particular point, by continually and silently discharging it to the 
earth. This is particularly the case in districts where every pole has an 
earth-wire fixed to it, running from the top to the bottom. That these 
wires effectually discharge a lightning -flash has been seen in cases where 
the wires have been terminated within a few inches of the top of the 
pole: a lightning-flash striking one of these destroyed the portion of pole 
above the wire, but at the point where the wire commenced all damage 
ceased." 

Writing of elephants, of whom 1,000 were in the late Durbar pro- 
cession at Delhi, a very noticeable feature in the march-part of the Peck- 
war garrison before Lord Lytton, on Nov. 25th, was a battery of 40 
pound Armstrongs, irreverently named the "Ark" or the " Menagerie," 
from its guns being drawn by elephants, and its caissons by bullocks. 
The well drilled pachiderms raised their trunks in concert as a salute 
when passing the flag, and the battery under salute was much admired. 

An annual report on the Kidderminster carpet trade says that among 
the Iatest'consumers of Kidderminster fabrics are the Chinese, for whom 
small squares of carpets on which to say their prayers have been made in 

considerable quantities in that Jown. 



INSURANCE. 



INSTTEAWCE AGENCY OF 

HUTCHINSON, MANN & SMITH. 

NO 314 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FKANCISCO. 

AGENTS FOB TUB 

Franklin Ins. Co Indianapolis, Ind New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas St. Paul F. & M. Ins. Co . . .St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio I Atlas Ins. Co Hartford Conn. 

People's Ins. Co Newark, N. J. Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

National L. I. Co., U. S. A. .Wash'n, D. C. JGirard Ins. Co. ... , Philadelphia, Pa. 

Capital Kepi-Dented, Twelve M ilions. 

POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY jvT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON, MANN & SMITH, General Agents, 

Dec. 5. 314 California street, San Francisco. 






N 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 
». 406 California street, next door to Banh of California. 

Fire Insurance Company. Capital, §300,000. Officers : — J. F. Houghton, 
President ; Ceo. H. Howard, Vice-President ; Charles R. Story, Secretary. H. H. 
BIGELOW, General Manager. 

Directoks.— San Francisco— Geo. H. Howard, F. D. Atherton, H. F. Teschemacher, 
A. B. Grogan, John H. Redington, A. W. Bowman, C. S. Hobbs, B. M. Hartshorne, 
D. Conrad, Wm. H. Moor, George S. Johnson, H. N. Tilden, W. M. Greenwood, S. L. 
Jones, George S. Mann, Cyrus Wilson, W. H. Foster, Jr., Joseph Galloway, W. T. 
Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling-. Oregon Branch — P. Wasserman, B. Gold- 
smith, L. F. Grover, D. Macleay, C. H. Lewis, Lloyd Brooke, J. A. Crawford, D. M" 
French, J. Lowenberg. Hamilton Boyd, Manager, W. L. Ladd, Treasurer. Marys- 
vine — 1). E. Knight, San Diego — A. H. Wilcox. Sacramento Branch — Charles 
Crocker, A. Redington, Mark Hopkins, James Carolan, J. F. Houghton, D. W. Earl, 
Isaac Lohman, Julius Wetzlar ; Julius Wetzlar, Manager ; I. Lohman, Secretary. 
Stockton Branch— H. H. Hewlett, George S. Evans, J. D. Peters, N. M. Orr, W. F. 
McKee, A. W. Simpson, A. T. Hudson, H. M. Fanning ; H. H. Hewlett, Manager ; N. 
M. Orr, Secretary. San Jose Branch — T. Ellard Beans, Josiah Belden, A. Pfister, J. 
S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, N. Hayes, Noah Palmer, B. D. Murphy , J. J. Denny, Man- 
ager ; A. E. Moody, Secretary. Grass Valley — William Watt, Robert Watt. Ne- 
vada — T. W. Sigoumey. Feb. 17. 

FLEE AND MARINE INSURANCE.— UNION I&S. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds. ---Established in 1S61. — >os. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital ¥750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed §1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco — J. Mora Moss, James Otis, Mosses Heller, N. J. T. Dana, M. J. 
O'Connor, W. W. Montague, Daniel Meyer, Adam Grant, Antoine Borel, . Charles 
Kohler, Joseph Seller, W. C Ralston, I. Lawrauce Pool, A. Weill, N. G. Kittle, Jabez 
H'.nves, Nicholas Luning, John Parrott, Milton S. Latham, J. Baum, M, D. Sweeney, 
Joseph Brandenstein, Gustave Touehard, G. Brignardello, George C. Hickox, T. Lem- 
men Meyer, J. H. Baird, T. E. Lindenberger. Sacramento — Ldw. Cadwalader, J. F. 
Houghton, L. A. Booth. Marvsville— L. Cunnigham, Peter Decker. Portland, O. — 
Henrv Failing. New York— J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, James Phelan. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N, G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Eohen, Surveyor. Oct. 26. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO, 
FIRE AND MARINE. 

jMasn Assets, Jan. 1st, 1876, 8478,000.— Principal Office, 

V> 21S and 220 Sansome street, San Francisco. Officers : — Peter Donahue, Pres- 
sident ; A. J. Bryant, Vice-President ; Charles H. Cushixg, Secretary ; H. H. Wat- 
son, Marine Surveyor. Board of Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. 
O'Sullivan, A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, 
George O. McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C F. 
Buckley. P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld. 
P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, O. W. Childs, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, -Sonoma County. H. W. Scale. Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of T,ife Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual C*>» £ a v 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- >» 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
April 23.] 313 Montgomery street, Nevada Block. 

H&MBURG-MAGDEBURG FIRE INSURANCE CO., OF HAMBURG. 

This Company is now prepared to issue policies against 
Loss or Damage by Fire at current rates. Every risk taken by this Company 
is participated in by three of the largest German Fire Insurance Companies, repre- 
senting an aggregate capital and surplus of over SIXTY-FOUR MILLION MARK, 
equal to SIXTEEN MILLION DOLLARS, U. S. GOLD, thus enabling this Company 
to accept large lines. GUTTE & FRANK, General Agents, 
Sept. 23. 321 Battery- street. 

BERLIN-COLOGNE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF BERLIN, 
GERMANY. 

Capital, 6,000,000 Reich-Marks, $1,500,000 U. S . Gold Coin. 
Having been appointed General Agents for the Pacific Coast, we arc now pre- 
pared to write Policies at the usual rates. TIDEMAN, HIRSCHFELD <fc CO., 
Nov. 4. Office: No. 302 Sansome street, under W. F. & Co.'s Bank. 

ESTABLISHED 1821. 

Capital, Gold 810,000,000. 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., OF LONDON. 

_ Dec. 16. Agents^ BALFO UR, GUTHRIE & CO. , 230 California st. 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN 

Subscribed Capital, £15, 000,000 ; Accumulated Fuuds, up- 
wards of $0,750,000 ; Annual Fire Premiums, less re-insurancc, £1,380,000. 
Losses promptly paid in United States Gold Coin. W. L. BOOKER, Agent, 

April 13. No. 319 California street, San Francisco. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., OF TORONTO, CANADA. 

(^ash Assets, $1,207,483.-- -London Assurance Corporation, 
J of London, England. Cash Assets, §14,093, 46b'.— Issue Policies of Insurance 
against loss by fire, at equitable rates. CROSS & CO., General Agents, 

Jan. 20. 31(3 California street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 
lapital 95,000,000.— >• -Agents: Balfour, Guthrie A Co., No. 



O 



230 California street, San Francisco. 



No. 18. 



E. D. Edwards. 



E. L. Craig. J. Craig. 

CRAIG, EDWARDS & CRAIG, 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law. Land Suits and Patent Right 
Cases a Specialty. No. 240 Montgomery street, San Francisco California. 
[July 29.] 



Feb. 8, 1877.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



HER ANSWER. 
All «Uv long iha h.l-l my question 

In hw heui ; 
Bhou an uu«ar ; 

M .i\ • ■■! ii' ii t ; 

Tbuobtd my hand In Good-ni hi rooting, 

n 
mamra early? 

Then Adieu 1 
Bent lirr head in farewell courl 

i >iiw Krd passed ; 
While a ii »1*1 lmml gripped mv heart-strinKS, 

1I»!. l them i.i-t. 
Still I waited, still I listened ; 

All in 1 
Trembled in tin- eyes thai watched her, 

And she stole 
l'l> the stain with measured footsteps 

But she turned 
Where a lamp in braaen bracket 

Brightly burned, 
Showed ma all the glinting ripples 

i »f her hair 
Veiled 1 er eyas in violet shadow— 

< rlimmered where 
Curved 1 her. month in soft compliance, 

A> she bent 
ard me from the dusky railing 

Where she leant. 
Ah, my love] * * * One white hand wanders 

Yi> her hair, 
Slowly lifts the rose that nestles 

Softly there ; 
Breathe* she in its heart my answer 

Shyly sweet, 
And Love's message mutely flutters 

To my feet. 

BOOK REVIEWS. 

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. By Murk Twain. The American Pub- 
lishing Company, Hartford, Conn.; Chicago, III.; Cincinnati, Ohio. A. Romun 

A: Co , Sun Fr.Linis 0, I laL 

Tl.i- 1 k i- sold only by subscription, and the agents for it are A. Roman 

<t Co., of this city. If proof were wanting to show that the possession of 
humor does not necessarily imply capability to write a book, Mark Twain's 
" Adventures of Tbm Sawyer* would furnish all the necessary evidence. 
1 nally the author's faculty of presenting the comic side of every- 

ropfl out but the story is a failure, devoid of interest, lacking in 
continuity, and without even the redeeming feature of probability. It 
ends as it begins in a muddle, and the volume drags through nearly 90 
pages before Mr. Clemens considers it necessary to introduce a dramatic 
incident involving a piece of body snatching and a murder. Most people 
will read it because it bears Mark Twain's name, but it might have been 
easily written by a schoolboy and embellished with a few humorous 
touches from the pen of the author of the "Jumping Frog." Here and 
there the humorist's pen appears, and then follows a blank and dreary 
waste, devoid of either interest or originality. The author throws down 
his pen at the end of the thirty-fifth chapter without rhyme or reason, but 
with a half threat to continue the history of Mr. Tom Sawyer at some 
future day, which may the fates prevent. The reader is forcibly con- 
strained to contrast the feebleness of the book with the vigor of such 
works as "Tom Brown " and other standard pictures of boys' characters. 
It is to be regretted that Mr. Clemens should have supplemented his 
works, which contain so much that is the type of American humor, with 
this vapid string of twaddle. It is but just to say that " Tom Sawyer " 
is profusely and capitally illustrated, though by whom the author does not 
state. The volume presents a very elegant appearance in its binding of 
blue and gold, and is beautifully printed on toned paper. 
An Historical Sketch of Los Angeles County, Californa. From the 
Spanish occupancy, DJ the* founding of the Mission San Gabriel Archangel, 
September a, 1771, to July -i, 167(i. Louis Lewin & Co., Los Angeles, 1870. 
This interesting history of the queen county of our State has been 
carefully and excellently compiled by J. J. Warner, «Benj. Hayes and 
J. P. Widney. It contains an accurate account of the progress of the 
county from the first settlement of the Fathers at San Gabriel up to the 
present time. It is a very valuable addition to the archives of our State. 
The CANADIAN Monthly for January, 1877, is well up to the mark of 
its usual excellence. It contains some capital poetry, notablv " Drifting," 
by H. L. Spencer ; " Visions of the Night," by Pearl ; "The Old Year 
and the ^ew," by Fidelis. "Juliet," Mrs. Swett-Cameron's story, and 
" As Long as She Lived," a novel by F. \V. Robinson, are continued, and 
there are several excellent original articles. 

Mrs. F. Hemans.— The poetical works of Mrs. Hemans have been re- 
published by Gall & Inglis of London; crown 8vo., 584 pages. We have 
only room for one brief poem. What words more full of genius than 
those of a "Butterfly Resting on a Skull?" 

The thoughts once chambered there 

Have gathered up their treasures and are gone. 
Will the dust tell us where 

They that have burst the prison-house have flown 1 
Who seeks the vanished bird 

By the forsaken nest and broken shell ? 
For thence he sings unheard, 

Yet free and joyous in the woods to dwell. 

A. L. Bancroft & Co. have just published a capital map of the Black 
Hills region, showing the gold mining district and the seat of the Indian 
war. The map, which is the most correct in existence of that portion of 
the country, gives a capital idea of the situation of the new diggings, the 
drawings having been made^by Mr. A. G. Bierce from the actual surveys 
ordered by the War Department. 



A Western editor, speaking of a concert-singer, says that her voice 
is delicious — pure as moonlight and tender as a shirt. 



[PssMAHsn AnruTuuDJum i 

A ROGUE'S RETROSPECT. 
Prom ii" Mm fort TOtnuw, Jtut I 
" Lorlnf? Pickering, lal 

ifoi . .i ,■■ mi 

" ull ■ wari ."i ■■ i 'i i foi 

1 ■ I ' up f '.. Ml ■ ourj In put mil of hliu, *s 

" ii w» suppuswi iw b ■ ■' ,i> PAUaMpMa dwfetta," 

t!i Ne« Bark Tribune. Jut 
"Arrest of Pickering?, Into Editor of the St. Louie Union. — SuW- 
"quenl accounts do not eutfralj confirm the reports hitherto i weived. II Ii now 

I, bj those who ought lo Know . I I ■ I . i In 31 J 

" MeNsra. Treat .v Krumrun, and subsequent!] committed i" tba custody ■>( th'o 
" Sheriff, or one of hi doputli ef But i Count While li utody he found 

pe, end nwdo off to perts unknown, Tnopertj In pursuit ol him , H 
■• i. ndd, onlj luoceedod in obtaining 1700 from hhn, amino other pro| 
■■ Those in pursuit, we are told, wars not prepared with was authority w follow hhn 
" beyond the limits <•( thu Stats, St. Louis /tejwbHctin, loth. 

[From the Now York Tribune, June 20. 1849. ! 
" The Absquatulator. — Information was receiwd from St. Joseph yesti r<l..\ 
"that Messrs. Krumrun A Treat came up with Pickering at that place; that tbcj 
" compounded with him tor bia offenses by receiving some $760 in money and about 
"$1,000 In notes of hand, etc., and then let him go. When the boat lufi In- uu- lit- 
" ting out for California, and they Were ruturniug by uaay stages to St. Louis.— St. 
" Louis Republican, 9th. 

| 'The above named Loring Pickering is now one of the Proprietors of the San 
Francisco Daily Keening Bullttin and Mond/if/ Call, two papers published in 
this city.] 

CENTENNIAL SURGERY. 
The following- liniment was prescribed for a broken thigh-bone by— 

Dr. Fish Oakland. | Da. Babcqck State Medical Examiner. 

Du, A. F. SaWVBB San Francisco : 

Chloroform 2 oz. I Tinct : Cauiphor 2 oz. 

Tlnct : Arnica (?) 2 oz. | Ol : Origanum (V) l oz. 

Ol : Olive 1 oz. w. 

Ft Liniment— Sign— Apply with friction two or three timea a day. 
Use the above for two months, and, if it should not produce the "effect desired, use 
t on your boots. THE VICTIM. 



Is it Repudiation P — For the State of California to issue bonds, neglect to pro- 
vide for their redemption at maturity, refuse payment and then deny the holders the 
right of trial in her own Courts. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Odd Fellows 4 Savings Bank .--- The Board of Directors of 
the Odd Fellows' Savings Bank have declared a dividend of eight and one-fourth 
(8,1) per cent, per annum on Permanent Deposits, and of seven and three-tenths 
(7 3-10) per cent, per annum on Short Deposits, for the semi-annual tenn ending De- 
cember 31st, 1876, payable on and after the 22d instant. 
San Francisco, Jan. 11, 1877. [Jan. 13.] JAMES BENSON, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank, No. 6 Post Street, 
Masonie Temple, San Francisco.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors of 
this Bank, held January 18th, 1877, a Dividend was declared at the rate of Nine (!)) 
per cent, per annum OH Tenn Deposits and Seven and One-Half (7£) per cent, per an- 
num on Ordinary Deposits, for the Semi-Annual Tenn ending January 21st, 1877, 
payable on and after January 25th, 1877, free of Federal Taxes. 
Jan. 27. H. T. CRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Saving's B uioii, 532 California street, corner 
Webb.— For the half year ending with December 31, 1876, a Dividend has been 
declared, at the rate of nine <9) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and seven and 
one-half (?i) per cent, on Ordinary Deposits, free of Federal Tax, payable on and af- 
ter January 15, 1877. [Jan. 6.) LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Saving's and Loan Society, 619 Clay street.— At a meeting- of 
the Board of Directors, a Dividend was declared for the tenn ending December 
31, 1870, at the rate of eight (8) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of 
Federal Tax, anil payable on and after January 15, 1877. 
Jan. 15. CYRUS W. CAKMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tlie Farmers'* and Mechanics' Bank of Savings have de- 
clared a dividend for the half year ending December 31st, 187(i, at the rate of 
nine percent, per annum on tenn, seven percent, per annum on class one(l) ordinary, 
and five per cent, per annum on class two (2) ordinary deposit, payable on and after 
January 15th, 1877. By order. [Jan. 6.] G. M. CONDEE, Cashier. 

" DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French Mntnal Provident Savings and Loan Society.. --A 
Dividend of nine (9) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Taxes, for the six 
months ending December 81, 1S76, was declared at the Annual Sleeting held on Jan- 
uary 15, 1877, payable on and after January 17, 1877. By order. 
Jan. 20. GUSTAVE MAHE, Director. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Dividend No. 5.— Collateral Loan anil Saving's Bank, cor- 
ner Post and Kearny streets.— An extra dividend of 5 per cent., for the six 
months ending December 31st, has been declared payable January 5th, to stock- 
holders of record December 27th. [Jan. 0.] F. S. CARTER, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Dividend No. 4.— Collateral Loan and Savisigs Bank, cor- 
ner Post and Kearny streets.— The Regular Monthly Dividend of 2 per cent., 
for December, is declared, payable January 5th, to stockholders of record Dec. 27th. 
Jan. G. F. S. CARTER, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Dime Bank.— For the half year ending- December 31st, a 
dividend as follows has been declared, viz. : on Tenn Deposits, 12 per cent. ; 
on Ordinary Deposits, per cent.— payable immediately. 
Jan. 0. 



W. McMAHi >N O'BRIEN, Secretary and Cashier. 



*T *T*6Lr% , '^>' a Week to Agents. Samples Free. 



%o5Z$77 



P. O. VICKERY, Augusta, Maine. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



THE "BULLETm" A3 A LEBELER. 
The " Bulletin" reads some half-dozen of its contemporaries, and 
the News Letter in particular, a homily upon the wickedness of libeling'. 
Angels of light defend us! Fancy Satan reproving sin! Of all the brutal 
verbal assailants — of all the vicious, insinuating maligners — of all the 
atrocious libelers San Francisco has ever known the Balletin is, and ever 
has been, the most vicious, the most insinuating, the most brutal, and the 
most atrocious of them all. Covert, sneaking and cowardly, as have been 
its attacks, yet no other paper has been so often convicted of libelling. 
Its record embraces more convictions than that of all the other papers, 
daily and weekly, put together. Its malice and deviltry have hounded 
some of our best citizens to their graves — aye, and have followed them to 
their tombs, when their spirits, no longer in the flesh, have taken their 
flight where the wicked cease from troubling and the weary are at rest. 
It is only a little more than a brief year since the whole city cried shame 
at this devilish libeler. The entire city uttered its sentiments, through 
the vastest and most representative public meeting ever assembled in San 
Francisco. In terribly indignant tones it gave vent to its feelings in 
thoughts that breathed and words that burned. .The brutal libeler, who 
was not satisfied even with the death of his victim, took refuge in a bar- 
ricaded office; and even there had need of the bayonets of the militia to pro- 
tect him from the righteous indignation of an outraged people. We know, 
from his own whining affidavits, how his circulation and his business 
generally fell off in consequence. They tell the tale of how honestpublic 
opinion regarded him as a libeler. Truly his offense was rank. He had 
hounded a man to death, who, take him all in all, we shall not soon look 
upon his like again. The masses had that day followed his remains to 
their last resting place, amidst signs of mourning, weeping and anguish, 
difficult to realize in these cooler times, and still more difficult to describe. 
The mourners were returning to their homes after the funeral of the dead 
Ralston, hoping that any little ill he had done had been buried with his 
bones, and believing that the memory of his great and noble deeds alone 
would be permitted to live after him. They, too, soon learned their mis- 
take. On every hand Bulletin news boys met them, and dinned into their 
ears and placed before their astonished eyes libels so brutually offensive, 
eo utterly devilish, that one would almost naturally look for their author- 
ship amidst the damned spirits in hell. There was no necessity to look so 
far. There actually lived on this earth, and in this generous-minded city 
of San Francisco, a creature vile enough and black-hearted enough to 
conceive, print and distribute them at such an hour. Whilst almost the 
whole city was performing a last sad rite, and was cherishing feelings 
almost too holy for adequate expression, this savage beast was in his den 
busily engaged in satisfying his ghoulish propensities; and so blinded was 
he with passion that he had the indecency to rush out to meet the mourn- 
ers, with the bloody signs of the wounds he had inflicted upon the dead 
body of his victim all trickling from his poisoned fangs. Great God ! It 
is this insensate libeler— this insatiable ghoul — this fiendish hater— this 
hellish monster, who now coos to us as mildly as a sucking dove, and tells 
us how pretty and how good of us it would be to practice the doctrine of 
the meek and lowly Jesus: that when we are smitten on one cheek we 
should turn the other also. Out, thou unconscionable hypocrite! A whited 
sepulchre; thou art within all rotten and putrid. Thy smell long ago be- 
came offensive to this people. What chloride of lime and carbolic acid 
are to the infected small-pox region, that the News Letter is to the plague- 
afflicted spots where Bulletin poison rots and mortifies all it touches. That 
is but one of the manifold uses of the News Letter, but it is the one above 
all others that may be relied upon to never fail. If it were possible that 
all other virtue should go out of us, yet so long as our right band knows 
its cunning — so long as one muscle of our body responds to a will, whose 
tenacity the Bulletin knows and dreads, so long will we continue our self- 
appointed, people-ratified, and heaven -confirmed duty of fumigating 
Fitch, and of holding Pickering's head in the "rogue's retrospect." To 
that end we are patronized. Pickering and Fitch know this; and that is 
why they would take up with any rascal who would help " crush the 
News Letter. ," But in that the rascals all will fail. 



THE PRESIDENTIAL COUNT. 
The developments made during the past week in regard to the 
Presidential electoral count have been many and interesting, though 
wretchedly disgusting. We know now from the inside something about 
the Louisiana fraud. The secretary of the Canvassing Board that counted 
Tildeu out and Hayes in has made a clean breast of the bad business, and 
the ramifications are instructive, but belittling, in the extreme. They 
furnish a curious commentary upon the position taken up just after the 
election, when it was proclaimed that the result reached by these legal 
wrong-doers must be accepted as final, and absolutely conclusive beyond 
the authority of any tribunal whatever to review or alter it. It is now 
fully apparent how monstrous it would have been to have accepted that 
doctrine. The Republican party has made a happy escape from a posi- 
tion that subsequent events have shown it coidd never have maintained 
before an enlightened world. The Democrats have shown theirconfidence 
in their case by agreeing to submit it to a tribunal that may or may not 
turn out to be impartial. Now the whole interest centers upon the do- 
ings of that tribunal. As we go to press, nothing definite is known. The 
Florida case is under consideration. Before another issue of the News 
Letter is out, we hope the long agony will be over, and that we shall 
really know who our new President is to be. 

WHEELER'S BID FOR POPULARITY. 
When a Judge descends into the region of politics, and makes a bid 
for votes, which is manifestly addressed to the most prejudiced and least 
thoughtful class of the community, he gives signs that he ought to step 
down and out. Judge Wheeler was particularly anxious to testify before 
the commission upon the Chinese question. Accordingly, he was called, 
and gave anti-Chinese testiruuny. That was the side the crowd favored, 
and evidence on that side was calculated to win votes. Soon, however, 
the Judge was brought up with a round turn, that exhibited him in a 
most unenviable light. The astute representatives of the other side dis- 
covered that Wheeler had, a very short time previously, expressed opin- 
ions just the other way, and upon cross-examination he was forced to this 
humiliating confession. We quote from the Bulletins report: " I do not 
recollect any conversation with Mr. Clark in which I expressed different 
views from those given here in evidence. If he says so, it must be true." 
As Mr. Clark did say so, it was of course true, and hence Wheeler's 
dilemma.' Surely there is no escape from the conclusion that the mind 
that could so aqt is unfit to discharge the highest judicial functions ! 



THE NEWSPAPER TOURNAMENT. 

1 When Greek meets Greek then But while old Pick and Czapskay 



comes the tug"- 
The clash of Argive spear 
On Argive helm we freely grant 
Was terrible to hear ; 
But quills converted into swords 
Are deadlier weapons far, 



Fitch 
The ancient Alta prod, 
A stronger lance — a nobler foe — 
Extends them on the sod ; 
The Cltronitfe with tempered quill 
Spits them both through and through, 
And morning versus evening sheet And, laughing as they squirm and 
Eclipses Grecian war. Cries Cock-a-doodle -do ! [curse, 

The Alta calls the Bulletin Then limping from the inky lists, 

A shrunken, toothless hag; Baffled, disgraced and sore, 

Old Pick replies that, as to teeth, The recreant warriors hide beneath 
The All-a shouldn't brag ; The apron of the Law ; 

The Call backs up the Bulletin And stripping off their suits of mail 
As 'tis in duty bound, (Blackmail, the reader knows), 

When, lo, the Uttle Post chips in, Each dons a brand new libel suit 
And puny squeaks resound. As refuge from his foes. 

So let the fight go on, say we ; 
The coward never wins ; 
A million juries could not cleanse 
Old Pickering from his sins ; 
Just as the pen, in wordy strife, 

Drops from his nerveless hand, 
So sh'all his tongue cleave to his mouth 
When on the witness stand. 



IMPOSSIBLE. 
Judge Ferral the other day laid down a rule for the guidance of news- 
paper men, which a moment's reflection ought to have satisfied him was 
impracticable. He held that a publisher ought to have full legal pos- 
session of evidence required, in any and all possible libel cases, before 
proceeding to press. The Judge in his time has been something of a 
newspaper man, and as such ought to have known that his rule is in 
effect impracticable. Telegrams, for instance, come from all parts of the 
world. In the name of common sense, we ask, of what use is the tele- 
graph if the press must needs wait for the written proofs of its utterances 
to come along? And then even those written proofs would not be re- 
ceived in Judge _ Ferral's, or any other Court, as really " legal" proofs. 
The same necessity would still exist for sending a commission of com- 
petent jurisdiction to take the testimony of the parties personally ac- 
quainted with the circumstances. This opens a large question, which 
shows how difficult it may be made to supply the public demand for in- 
formation from everywhere. At present the press lays the whole world 
under contribution for news, and all it can, in the first instance do, is to 
take reasonable precautions to ensure the reliability of its correspondents. 
Judge Ferral was pleased to say that "it was not to be expected that if 
witnesses were in the heart of Africa, or the snows of Eussia, the trial 
could be postponed until they could be heard from. That he considered 
unreasonable." This was very rhetorical, but very fallacious. Extreme 
as is the case imagined, it is nevertheless just what the press may at any 
moment be called upon to do, if it is to continue its functions as a gatherer 
of the world's news. A steamship voyage of twenty five days, however, is 
very different from a trip to the " heart of Africa," wherever that may be 
supposed to he. 

LEGAL ADVICE WITHOUT A FEE. 
"We don't like promoting litigation, yet under the circumstances we 
feel constrained to suggest a little more of it to Pickering and Fitch. 
Their hands are in just now, and they might as well complete their work 
while they are about it. Why does not the good deacon, for instance, go 
after the Alta for publishing that little Czapskay story? Simonton went 
and begged to have it taken back, and almost represented Fitch as being 
with tears in' his eyes. Yet the record stood and stands unchallenged 
until this day, which is not a pretty or a pleasant sight for a deacon. 
Then why do not both Pickering and Fitch go after the Chronicle for that 
atrocious libel representing them to be partners in puffing a dangerous 
poison, and pecuniarily interested in making the ignorant portion of the 
public believe it to be a safe and pleasant cordial? Then why does not 
Pickering, in particular, go after the Chronicle for that long and very 
precise indictment, in which his flight from St. Louis, and his exploits 
with the wagoners who brought him across the mountains, were so cir- 
cumstantially described ? So long as these really serious matters remain 
unchallenged it is idle to make a fuss about more innocent matters. 
Their present attitude is like that of the whining urchin who sought to 
escape punishment for eating the whole pudding, upoa the plea that he 
had not made away with the last plum that was left upon the plate. 



THE EFFECT OF THE HAWAIIAN TREATY 
The advocates of the Hawaiian reciprocity treaty loudly pro- 
claimed that it would greatly increase our trade with the Islands and 
would lessen the price of sugar. Those were the statements before the 
event, now for the results after it. Our exports from this port to Hono- 
lulu show no appreciable increase, whilst sugar is higher than before the 
treaty came into operation. An amount represented by the sum of the 
sugar duties is wrung from the taxpayers of this country and goes into 
the pockets of some dozen English and American planters, residents of 
Hawaii. Now come England, Spain and other countries, claiming that 
under " the most favored nation clause in our international treaties they 
are entitled to like privileges to those enjoyed by the planters of Kala- 
kaua's kingdom. We are paying a large bounty and involving ourselves 
in troublesome disputes for the sole benefit of a small class possessing no 
claims to such special consideration. 

It is a truism that a fault of youth, if repented of and atoned for by a 
pure after life, ought to be allowed to sink into oblivion. But if the wick- 
edness be continued from youth to mature manhood, growing from bad to 
worse, surely it is not amiss to point out that as the twig was inclined so 
the tree grew up. 

There is at least one thing ■worse than libeling a rogue, and that is 
aiding him to cover up his tracks and get away quietly with his booty. 
Bulletin please copy. 

What Causes Diphtheria ? Our filthy streets and sewers. 



l-vi.. 8, 1877. 



CALIFORN1 \ Al>\ l-:i:il-li:. 



9 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"llMr Ihr Qrtttf ' Vt ^>t |)M d«vU *rt ihooT" 
*On» lh»l will liUjf thr ilovtl. air. with »• U." 



The exciting event of th« week has, of course, been the rowing match 
between Mr. bishop end .Mr. Mestaver, two gentlemen, uour 
know, who contribute hugely t.< miki the company o( the California 
one of the 1 ■< -t En the world. The c turee wae From the end of 
Long Bridge e herf, opposite the swinuninn bathe. to the Fisherman's 
long .ui-l tedious row of Mme 300 yards. In spite of the doeire 
of the prindpali to keep the affair quiet it leaked oat among the hai 
ind 1 'in.- of the 1 Sty Front sp irta, an i there was ■ large attend 
1 turned the scale at 329 pounds, and was richly at- 
tired in a red velvet doublet, :i blank wig and long Hessian boots, lli- 
oondition was far from being perfect, but as he donned a huge beaver 
with a yellow feather and stepped lightly into the mud-scow which be 
propel, there was ■ loot of determination in his eye which said 
plainly, " 1 will die or conquer." Mr. Bishop, who is 42 pounds heavier 
Ulan Mr. Mestaver, seemed trained too fine. There was not a imper- 
il flesh t" \»- seen anyn here, and he had selected the costume 
of .1 red-headed stable-boy as being the most advantageous fox the display 
of his well knit and iron frame. He had s slight advantage In the choice 
of scows, which he toss e d for, selecting one which was nearly empty, 
while, at the lowest computation, there was over half a ton of mud in Mr. 
r's shell. At the firing of a pistol both men o,,t away well to- 
gether, and at the end of the first fifty yards they were neck ami neck. 
Here Mr. Meetayer became afflicted with temporary blindness from his 

exertions sad Steered wildly into the wharf, carrying away seven of tlie 

piles and precipitating many of the spectators into the water. At this 

juncture, abo, Mr. Bishop threw out a tow rope to some of lift friend* 

on shore, but the referee decided that it was an unfair advantage and had 
the cable cut loose. The first one hundred yards were rowed in seventeen 
minutes, Mr. Bishop leading by a clear length, but Mr. Mestayer^a in- 
domitable pluck came to his rescue, and, grasping his thirty-feet oars 

hrmly. he put in a spurt which brought'his boat's nose in front of Mr. 
Bishop's at the 200 yards post. Time, 43 minutes 12 seconds. From here 
to the winning post it was a desperate struggle, each man making the 
most frantic efforts to win. As it was impossible to see any difference at 
the finish the judges decided that it was a dead heat, and the race will be 
over again to-morrow, after morning service, at the same time and 

place. 

About twenty-two miles from the town of Oroville is a small min- 
ing camp occupied by seven or eight hard-working partners. At the time 
of the Presidential election they clubbed together to have a messenger 
sent out on horseback from the town giving the result. They were all 4 
Tilden men, and had put by a demijohn of whisky, which was to be con- 
sumed in the event of his election. Late one evening, as they were sit- 
ting round the Log tire, a boy came into camp with the long expected 
tiding in an envelope. The cover was easily torn off, but a new trouble 
arose at this juncture, as none of the party could read except Jack Lee, 
and he had to spell the words out and couldn't even do that at night. How- 
ever, they put »n a fresh log, made a blaze, and Jack set to work. After 
half an hour's study he had made out " H-a-y e-s d-e-f-e-t-e-d," and the 
crowd gave one wila hurrah, fetched out the demijohn, and swallowed 
about six drinks apiece. " Hold on," says Jack Lee, who was still study- 
ing the letter over the tire; " Hayes defeated T-i-1-d-e-n, Tilden." A 

howl of anguish swept through the glen as the last word was read, and 
silently ana sorr o wf u lly the unhappy politicians drowned their grief in 
further applications to the wicker-work bottle. " Ah dear ! Oh my ! " 
sobbed Jack Lee, still scanning the crumpled paper. "Here's another 
word after 'Tilden,' but its a queer one, and I guess it'll only make 
things wus : 'Hayes defeated, Tilden e-1-e-ck-t-ed, elected.' " With a 
wild shout those whilom wretched men sprang to their feet to frighten 
the coyote with their cries of joy. "Lets drink to the health of Samuel 
. I. Tilden, President of the United States," they yelled together, and 
with one mind they clutched the- demijohn. Alas! it was too late ; the 
investigation had beeu a long one and the bottle was empty! 

The Call-Bulletin combination has Ions been notorious for stealing 
dispatches, special reports and items of interest from the columns of the 
■>' . but never until lately were these journals suspected of dressing 
u]. local items, like the renowned " Sleepy Tommy," and crediting them- 
selves with the imperishable renown attached to the narrative. For the 
benefit of our readers who may not have read the paragraph, it should be 
Stated that Sleepy Toniioy was either a real or a suppositious cat, who was 
honored with a detailed account in the Chronicle of the way in which he 
was crushed under a broken spittoon, a sharp edge of which entered his 
vertebras and extinguished his vital spark. The Bulletin, of course, re- 
printed the item in different Language, only unfortunately, while vouch- 
ing for the truth of the matter, it turned "Sleepy Tommy" into a man, 
and sent f< rth into the world the singular account of the accident by 
which the gentleman met his death. If the result of the matter should 
be to make the Bulletin suspect a plant in all its contemporary's items, 
and inspire it with a wholesome fear of stealing news for the future, 
"Sleepy Tommy" will not have been written about in vain. Just at 
present, however, Mr. Fitch is not sweet on cat stories, and it is rumored 
that, after finding out how ridiculous he had made bis paper in the above 
instance, he went home and drowned four kittens and their mother, a 
faithful old Tabby who had lived several years in the family. 

Pauline Lucca is at present in a very uncomfortable predicament. 
She paid about §8,000 to her lawyers to get divorced from her first hus- 
band, so as to enable her to marry her second, and now it turns out that 
she is not properly separated from liege No. 1, and has, therefore, com- 
mitted bigamy in uniting herself to liege No. 2. In addition to this she 
has the pleasing reflection of knowing that she has expended a small for- 
tune in the operation. If the divorce is held to be invalid and Pauline 
fails to get the 88,000 back from her attorneys; if husband No. 1 should 
come over here and shoot husband No. 2, and then have Pauline arrested 
for her bigamous union with the deceased, and get sentenced to be hung 
himself for killing his rival, it would be a magnificent opportunity fo. 
Pauliue to swallow poison just as husband No. 2 falls with a thud throng] 
the trap-door, while the chorus chant a plaintive hvmn and the apoti 
eosis of Pauline, her two husbands and the four lawyers takes pi;. 
in full view of the audience. The idea is commended to intending pi.. 
Wrights and composers of operatic librettos. 



Religious principle -honld always I mmendi when 

the practice o( it ent r ool- 

n, a whitewaaber ny trade ami \ Moan 

;■ i.'ii hersi was calh ■! in bj 

w.i*iiii< upon and 1 verj thin 

eluded, when the proprietor told him hi 1 » as not 

to interfere « Itti the u.-.-k <l:.y trade. "J . ;m ,\ |Uuh J ob M dat, 

answi <■ •!, '■ ,1 breakln an' pollutui 1 of ds holy Babbut Dat 

i, I . ah ulates t" |im in bli ob devotion, and to nwul- 

h r de word ob de Mnel High. 1 can do do such job, sure ami sartin." 

Fiuding him obdurate and respecting bis sincerity, the saloon-keeper did 

not press the matter, bul changed the subject adroitly, and remarked. 

" I'll tell you a jo! 1 you can do for 111c right away, Ti USt full 

. . ami if you can steal me a nice terriei dog, TO give you five dol- 
lars." " Full ob rats ! steal yew a nit terrier? tiolly. If I di n't know 
de lubliest little dog. Pr lessor, you ever bah seen; and if I can't nip dat 
hj. 'fo Saturday afnoon, I*se a black thief, and de Word am mi a 

lie. and 1 don't BpecS to git saved." After all, the maintenance of his re- 

ligiooj principles was no pecuniary loss to him. 

A gentleman, who has recently newly furnished and carpeted his 
house, Was very much struck by tin- elegant appearance of some excess- 
ively picturesque porcelain vessels which, in a community where so many 

persons chew tobacco, are a necessary adjunct to the parlors of every 

mansion. lie did not chew himself, but many of his friends did, and he 
wisely considered that their purchase might save his carpets. The arti 
cles in question were elegantly designed in blue ami gold and 0/ the new- 
est fashion, like antique Roman jugs. On his arrival home his wife ran 
out to meet him, put her arms round his neck, and said : " Oh, you dear 
old darling, to send me those pretty vases. Come and see where I have 
put them. There's two on the parlor mantelpiece and I have planted 
Chinese bulbs in the other two and set them in the bay-window." He 
compromised the matter finally by explaining that they were not in- 
tended either for mantelpieces or flowerpots, but were a sort of a !h>or 
vase for the accommodation of his friends ; but he could not understand 
why she Should burst out crying and call him a mean thing for buying a 
lot of dirty, common, ugly spittoons to put in her nice parlors. And 
then she locked them up in a back closet aud be has not seen them since. 

Mr. Mace, the renowned pugilist, has a very charming and original 
way of getting newspaper notices entirely free of cost. He enters the 
editor s sanctum, and after cracking all the bones in that gentlemau's 
hand as he shakes it, he usually lifts him by the seat of his pants off the 
ground and inquires what the cost of an editorial article on his muscle 
would be. If the suspended and half-choked editor has only strength of 
mind enough to say " Nothing," he is immediately restored to terra jinna 
and allowed to offer Mr. Mace the hospitalities of the house. Should he 
remain obdurate on the subject, Mr. M. immediately produces two pair of 
gloves, with a friendly offer to spar, which at once cloies the bargain. 
Under these circumstances, and after every opportunity to smell Mr. 
Mace's fist, the 2\ C. can only remark that the renowned champion is a 
perfect geutleman, a very Adonis, and one of nature's noblemen. It is 
only just, however, to add that we have a new lock on our door and 
interview all strangers hereafter through a grating. 

The character of our city is slowly changing for the worse. For 
over four weeks there has not been a single prominent defaulter or an ab- 
sconder of the slightest importance. It is a sad acknowledgment to have 
to make, but even the bankrupts are paying 75 cents on the dollar and 
newspapers are flagging for want of a sensation. There is, however, a 
prospect in the future of all this being amended. A plot is on foot to 
blow open the safe of the Nevada Bank and extract its contents. As we 
have a slight interest in it ourselves (say half a million), we decline, of 
course, to give the names of the intending participants, but if it only 
comes off successfully the bloated monopoly will be broken up, the T. C. 
will have a new silk nat and rafts of coin, and Cun. Virginia will be im- 
mediately boosted up to S700 again to make good the loss. 

The Sacramento Da'ly Record-Union is fast getting to be a re- 
spectable paper. At present it contains only eight filthy quack advertise- 
ments, and these are carefully put on the last column of the fourth page, 
where they are not likely to be noticed. It is very gratifying to mark the 
steady onward march of this well edited journal. There is nothing which 
makes a paper so purely a family treasure as the insertion of advertise- 
ments of this nature. They are excellent reading; for girls and boys who 
may come across them, and while they enrich the publishers who print 
them, they are a source of incalculable profit to the quack-harpies who, 
under the name of doctors, prey on the ignorance of the young. 

It 13 worthwhile impaneling juries and spending a great many hun- 
dred dollars to find out that the Ashtabula disaster occurred through 
weakness of the bridge, or that, of the 218 victims of the Brooklyn fire, 
two were burned and the rest suffocated. Juries always were the most 
idiotic bodies, next to Supervisors, known to modern times, anil it is not 
too much to assert that twelve men could be found in almost any city of 
the world who would hold an inquest on a skeleton and render a verdict 
that death had resulted from congestion of the lungs. 

" It is ail ill wind that blows nobody any good," and on the same 
principle the many beautiful lakes whicli the rain has formed in our city 
have not been an unalloyed evil. On Tuesday last a large flock of wild 
ducks alighted on the spacious lagoon recently on Montgomery street, 
and afforded excellent shooting to some of our energetic sportsmen. 
Should the rain only continue to fall plentifully the Supervisors will 
guarantee that the sewers shall remain choked, and an exciting regatta 
may shortly be looked for on Kearny street. 

The excellent cu^crimination of our police force was admirably illus- 
trated last Sunday in the subjection of the Vienna Ladies' Orchestra to a 
most uncalled-for arrest. Whilst the ophidian reptiles known as dives 
carry on their nightly career of sin and blasphemy unrestrained, this ex- 
cellent combination of musicians - .« ■ ■' » special point of assault 

'.;■■. i 



10 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER A"ND 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



THE LITTLE DAUGHTER. 

Oh, she's a flower! — within our home 

So dainty-sweet, so gently growing, 
That every day, new petaled blooms 

To our delighted eyes are showing. 
And she is a bird! — for in her voice 

The tiny music-tones are hiding, 
Whene'er she speaks, they just peep out 

And gaily call, our fond searoh guiding. 

And she is a star! — her bright, pure eyes 
Are beaming in their azure setting 

"With grave, reproving, mild surprise, 
At all our worldly-wise forgetting. 

And she is a blessing! — ere she came, 

Our boys were rough and often ready 

For cruel sports, but now they're tame ; 
Dear little Eva has made them steady. 

la she an angel? — Ah, no, I say — 

I'd rather think the angels brought her, 

For their strong wings can tly away ; 

And we would keep our little daughter. 
— Mary Standish Kobhison. 

THE HAYES-WHEELER INTER VIEW. 

The cloth having been removed, the Gov- 
ernor of Ohio pushed the decanter toward the 
gentleman from Malone. "It is currant wine," 
he said, "made by my xincle Birchard in 1856. 
Don't spare it, I beg of you." 

"Thanks," said Mr. Wheeler, making a wry 
face. 

" It is perfectly harmless, I assure you," con- 
tinued the Governor. "As my uncle neglected 
to cork the bottles, the alcoholic principle has 
been entirely destroyed by the process of fermen- 
tation. Perhaps you notice the acetous flavor. " 

"I think I do," said Mr. Wheeler. 

"As for myself," said Mr. Hayes, reaching 
for the milk pitcher, "I prefer milk and water — 
half milk and half water. It is a pleasant and 
innocent beverage, and it stimulates the opera- 
tions of my mind." 

The two statesmen then settled back comfort- 
ably in their chairs, and the following conversa- 
tion ensued: 

Gov. Hayes: The present situation is one 
which calls for stern integrity of purpose and 
high patriotic endeavors on our part, Mr. 
Wheeler. Do you follow me ? 

Mr. Wheeler: I catch the idea. 

Mr. Hayes: It is a great responsibility, an 
awful responsibility, which ha« been thrust upon 
us by a majority of our countrymen. 

Mr. Wheeler: I beg your pardon, Governor. 
A majority? 

Gov. Hayes: Yes, a majority— a grand popu- 
lar majority. Murat Halstead has shown that 
the fraudulent votes cast for Tilden, and the 
Republican citizens prevented from voting by 
intimidation and force, number just 203,815 — 
which leaves us a grand popular majority. 

Mr. Wheeler: Do you swallow all that? 

Gov. Hayes: My dear Mr. Wheeler, I told 
you that I prefer this to any other beverage. It 
stimulates my mental faculties. I swallow it 
not only with ease but also with enjoyment. 

Mr. Wheeler: I meant — 

Gov. Hayes: Precisely. As I was saying, 
having been elected by an overwhelming major- 
ity of our fellow citizens, it is our duty to stand 
firm, not for ourselves, but on the poor negro's 
account. You follow me — the poor, oppressed 
negro ? 

Mr. Wheeler: I apprehend. It is on the poor 
negro's account. But about this infernal count- 
ing business. Zach Chandler says — 

Gov. Hayes: Zach Chandler? Will you per- 
mit me to inquire who Zach Chandler may be? 

Mr. Wheeler: Why Zach; old, Zach! He's 
engineering our — 

Gov. Hayes: Pardon me. You are wandering 
from the subject. I have no acquaintance with 
Mr. Jack Chandler, the engineer. Why do you 
wink? 

Mr. Wheeter; Oh, merely a chronic affection 
of my upper eyelid. Don't mind me. 

Gov. Hayes; For the poor negro's sake it is 
important that the country should sustain the 
verdict of the patriotic Returning Board of Lou- 
isiana, whose decision, a* yon truly said in 1875, 
is entitled to great respect. 

Mr. Wheeler; But unfortunately I said — 

Gov, Hay«s: Precisely, And it is equally 

important that the people should be brought to 

see how pure, loyal, aniL patriotic a man is J. 

Madison Wella, who was hunted through 

' - - l ' * "U 1-' ■'-- , d of vV,, ni (general 



VjOi CiilfSt, 



now come down to common i 



sense. We are alone, and cannot be overheard. 
Now, things in Louisiana look c!u?ty. If Don 
Cameron could only persuade the old man — 

Gov. Hayes: Don Cameron? I have never 
heard of him. Is he the Spanish Ambassador? 
Mr. Wheeler: I tell you, Go;ernor, we are 
alone. We must look matters in the face. It 
seems ae if the bottom were dropping out at 
New Orleans. Pinchback and Warmonth and 
Casey have gone back on us, and you know 
Casey means a good deal. Now, there's got to 
be a compromise. We must drop some more 
money there. Jay Gould has promised— 

Gov. Hayes: My dear Mr. Wheeler, I am 
sorry for you. Drop money, compromise, Jay 
Gould! My Uncle Birchai'd's wine has gone to 
your head. 

Mr. Wheeler: Well, I see it's no use. If you 
won't understand you won't. But I have 
profited by your conversation, and appreciate 
your lofty patriotism and devotion to the poor, 
oppressed colored man. If I should be elected 
and you not, I will remember this point. 

Gov. Hayes: You elected ; me not! What do 
you mean? 

Mr. Wheeler: If there should prove to have 
been no choice of the people, and your name 
should go to the House and mine to the Senate — 
Gov. Hayes: My dear Wheeler, I have done 
you injustice. You are perfectly sober. Please 
forget my hasty expression. Why, my inaugu- 
gural is all written, and in type in the State 
Journal office. I am sure if there is any need of 
money my uncle's will has put me in a posi- 
tion — Act as you think best, my dear Mr. 
Wheeler, for the interest of the poor negro. You 
follow me ? Mr. Wheeler: I think I do. 

Gov. Hayes: And as you are going East, per- 
haps you might say that you found me it nly 
resolved to do my duty as a patriot, and that 
my heart beats warmly for the poor African. 
What, winking again ? What a merry dog you 
are, Wheeler. — New York Sun. 



Mr. Walter, of the Times, has returned to 
England with very peasant impressions of the 
United States. He told one of the persons who 
interviewed him that the Centennial was the 
best Exhibition which had been held. He was 
amazed at the generosity of the railway com- 
panies in carrying him everywhere gratuitously, 
and at the infatuation of the country, which, 
after having by its Exhibition called all the 
world to compete with it, still maintained pro- 
tective duties. He had admirable opportunities 
of witnessing the contest for the Presidency, 
and came to the conclusion that it costs more 
to make a President than to keep a Prince. 
Some one was bold enough to ask him if he 
had seen many rivals of the Times, to which he 
replied by a smile and a shake of the head. 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing Thursday, Feb. 1st, 18'i7 t and until 

further notice, Trains and Boats will Leave 

San Francisco: 

(Overland Ticket Office, at Ferry Landing, foot of 

M arket Street.) 



7(\(\ A. M. (dailv), Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
,\J\J street Wharf) —Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stage connection for Sonoma, Calistoga, Wood- 
land, Williams, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 

(Sundays excepted) for Woodland, Williams and 
Knight's Landing. (Arrive S:10 r.M.) 



8(\{\ A.M. (daily). Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
• \J\J land Kerry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding and Portland(0.), Colfax, Reno, Ugden and Oma- 
ha. Connects at Gait with train arriving at lone at 
3:40 r.M. (Arrive 5:35 p.m.) 



3f\C\ P.M. (daily) San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• \j\J land Ferry), Stopping at all VV 



rives at San Jose at 5:30 p.m. 



■ Stations. Ar- 
(Arrive 9:35 a.m.) 



A 00 P,5L t^i'y) Express Train (via Oakland Ferry). 

j^yjyj for Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall, San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara, 
"Los Angeles," Wilmington, Anaheim, San Diego, Col- 
ton and Indian Wells (Arizona Stage Connection). Con- 
nects at Niles with train arriving at San Jose at 6:51 
p.m. " Sleeping Cars" between Oakland and Los Ange- 
les. (Arrive 1-2:40 p.m.) 



A AA P. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market St. 
"±«V/VJ Wharf), connecting with trains for Calistoga, 
Woodland, Williams, and Sacramento; and at Sacramen- 
to with Passenger Train, leaving at 9:15 p. si. for 
Truckee, Reno, Carson and Virginia City. " Sleeping 
Cars " between Vallejo and Carson. 
(Sundays excepted) for Napa and Calistoga. 

(Arrive 11:10 A.M.) 



A f\f\ P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
*i.*\J\J (from Market St. Wharf), for Benicia and Land- 
ings on fc^ftSsi^".!****" 1! iver; also, taking the third class 
o\ onnect with train leaving Sac- 
y. (Arrive 8:00 p. m. ) 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS. 
From ''SA3T FRAXCISCO." 



trough Third class and Freight 
hrop and Mohave, arriving at 
yat 11:15 a.m. 

(Arrive 7:30 a.m. 





(k 7.00 


p 3.30 




7-30 


4.00 




8.00 


4.30 




8 30 


5.00 


>• 


9.00 


5 30 


9.30 


6.00 




10.00 


0.30 


a 


11.00 


7.00 




1-2.00 


S.10 




p 1.00 


9.20 




2.00 


10.30 


{. 3.00 





EP 1 a CIO 


il- 
ls 


I'll. 45 








Z,.- (A10.30 


P 1.30 


•a -J n.30 




£s 


rl->. :su 





p 3.00 

•7.00 

S.'.o 

•11.45 



Lll.00 
• 1.30 

•10.30 



m 



8.30 
9 30 

' 1.00 
8.80 
4.30 
5.30 
6.30 
7.00 
S.10 
9.20 

10.30 



t0.30 

Ptl.00 

3 00 

4.00 

tS.10 



A 0.10 

11.00 

P11.45 



A10.30 

11.30 



A 8.00 A 7.30 



t9. 30 


1100 


p 3.00 


4 00 


4.00 


5.00 


13.10 


C.00 






£ o 


ht?, 


= 5 


?Z8 


-.02 


S~ 


o 






o u 


A S.30 


— •3 












r. - 





A 9.00 

12.00 

p 1.30 



To FERNSIDE— except Sundays— 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 A.M., 
and 5 p. M. 



To "SAW FRANCISCO." 



10.30 

• 4.00 

5.0° 

6.0" 






I A 5.40 
I 8.30 



A 7.00 
8.03 
9.00 

p 3.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6. OS 

HO.OO 



2, 

mi 


At0.4.-| 

7.55 

11.15 

til. 45 

p 3.40 



At7.03 
8.15 
11.35 
Ptl20S 
4.03 
t4.45 



A 0.40 

7.40 
8.40 
9.40 
10.40 
P 12.40 
2.40 
4.40 
5.40 
0.40 
7.50 
o.oo 
10.10 



from ALAMEDA. 



*5 00 
•5.40 
'10.20 



I- '1220 
1.30 



p 3.20 
•7.20 
*8.30 



f >. I A 9.00 
S S I 12.00 



lr 1.3 



FROM ALAMEDA. 



AlO.OOlAll.OOlPl2.00 
I | L00 



A 5.10 
5.50 



All. 40 
E 1.2! 



OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 



A 6.50 
7.20 
7.50 
8.25 
8.50 
9.20 
9.50 
10.50 
11.50 

Pli 
2.50 
3.20 
3.50 



A10.20 
11.20 

p 12.20 



p 4.20 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 
6.30 
6.50 
8.00 
9.10 
10.20 



A 5.20 

6.00 

p 1.50 



p 1.20 
1.35 



From FERNSIDE-Sundays excepted -6.55, 8.00, 11.05 

A. M., and 6.05 p. M. 

♦Change Cars at " Broadway," Oakland. 

A— Morning, p— Afternoon. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Tow.ve, General Superintendent. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

N OfiTHEBN DIVISION . 

Commencing; Nov. 6th, 1S7G. Passenger 
Trains will leave San Francisco from Passenger De- 
pot on Townsend stree t as follows : 

8 A A.M (daily) for San Jo5e, Gilroy, Hollister, Tres 
•"v Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all Way 
Stations. g3?~At Pa-iaro connects with the Santa 
Cruz Railroad forApros and Santa Carz. At Salinas 
connects with the M. & S. V. R. R. for Moxtebev. Stage 
connectionsmade with this train. 



UOr a m. (daily) forMcnlo Park and Way Sta- 
•^"-> tiou s. 

3 X p.m. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
• wf -' Gilroy and Way Stations. 



4.40 



p.m. (daily) for San Jose and Way Stations. 



(\ ^ p ' 1 '" (daily) * or ^ an Mateo and Way Stations. 

SOI THEKV DIVISION. 

ptg"' Passengers for points on the Southern Division 
of the road will take the ears of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 rm. daily, and making- 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton and Indian Wells. 
A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 
J. L. Willcutt, Gen'l Passenger and Ticket Agent. 
[November IS.] 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S S^EEL PENS. 

Sold by all Stationers throughout the 
World. Sole Agent for the United States : MR. 
HENRY IIQE. '.H .I..hu street, X. Y. Jan. 10. 



H. H. MOOEE. 

Dealer in Boohs for libraries. --A large 
assortment of fine and rare books just received, 
ano for sale at fiuo Montgomery street, near Merchant, 
San Francisco Oct. 24. 






Feb 8, 1877. 



i ILIFORNIA AH\ ERTISKR. 



li 



NOTABILIA. 



A country subscribe. 
I'"- oil I in fr..nt ..i it, mi. I he won bad 

■ ■ tie- city doily 

.1. item "ii th.- 1. ill ..i" fan .-t" thai 

:i.| excellent ■ 
oi thin Htobllahment. Their oonfectionery, caki -. etc, are loo well know n 

There is no comfort in housekeeping unletsyoa have a good stove, 
and so man} worthless nuuroe are in the market whii b ilce and 

will not draw, that it if an important thins t " know where to buy 
one, !■ oya, on Batfa beluw JackBon, is sole agent 

for the Union Range, the bt -t ever invented, It-* merits tu a small con- 
mmer of fuel. a perfect baker and broiler, are now universally aoknowl- 
Mi. !»■■ La Uontanya has an immense Btock of all kinds «>f 
are. 

Old Squire B. was elected Judge of the Inferior Court of Borne count] 
in Georgia. When he went home bis delighted wife exclaimed : " Now, 
., you are Judge, what am IV " The same darned fool yon altera 
was !" was the reply. She never forgave him that remark faraix months, 
when he suddenly propitiated her with a present of a HalletA Davis 
They are toe beat in the world. Badger, 13 Sansome street, ia 
the agent, 

An Irish baronet had tin many raKliits on hia property that he made 
candh a of their fat. "' And, t.» prove the fact." said he, " the moment a 
terrier-dog comes into the room the candles immediately be^in to Tim." 



'Tia little troubles that w..ar the ln-art nut. It is easier to throw a 
1 e'.l a mile than a feather, even with artillery. Forty little debt* 
of a dollar each will cause vou more trouble and dunning than one big one 
•»f a thousand, but one bottle of Gerke Wine will dissipate all the troubles 
and help a man to stem them. I. Landsberger, 10 and 12 Jones' Alley, is 
the agent for this capital dinner wine. 



Many a man who pretends to dislike pastry always has his finders in 

i> 'a pie. The best pics in the world are not made with fresh eggs, 

; li the condensed e'_'.L;s sold by S. Foster & (_'u., ;i(i California street, 

One tin contains the equivalent of twelve eggs, and any one who ever 
US) d them once will tell you that for all culinary purposes where eggs are 
required, this preparation, in its condensed form, is inimitable. 

"Why is fame like an eel ? Because it is very hard to catch and a 
great deal harder to hold. The fame of the Arcade House, of J.J. 
O'l'.rien & Co., has reached all over the Pacific Coast. Their dry goods 
are a by-word with the ladies, and just at present they are offering some 
immense bargains and clearing out their stock. The address is 924 to 928 

Market street. 

Summer is proud, and goes before a fall. 



There is a growing feeling among the American people that the man 
who ran heaj a fellow mortal complain of a cold in the head, and abstain 
from telling him what to do for it, is the man who should be the next 
President. At all events he ought to get photographed at Bradley & Ru- 
lofson's, so that the world might see his picture. The convex photo of 
Bradley & Rtdofson has no peer. 



"Where is the best place for reflection ? In a mirror. Yes, pro- 
vided the rooms are lit with gas and fitted with Bush & Milne's elegant 
fixtures. Their place of business is on New Montgomery street, under the 
Grand Hotel, and they are also agents for the new Silicated Carbon Filter, 
which effectually keeps out all the impurities found in water, and makes 
it perfectly sweet and pure. 

Charles Lamb, when speaking of one of his rides on horseback, re- 
marked that " all at once his horse stopped, but he kept right on." Prob- 
ably a girth broke, which caused the accident. If he had only bought his 
harness at Main & Winchester's, 214 Battery, the catastrophe would not 
have taken place. 

Cain was the first bulldozer on record. 



If falsehood paralyzed the tongue, what a death-like silence would 
pervade society. It is no falsehood, however, to say that A. P. Hotaling, 
429 and 431 Jackson street, is agent for the genuine "Old Cutter Whisky," 
which, far from paralyzing the tongue, sets it going cheerfully, and is the 
purest and best stimulant a man can swallow. 

' ' What kind of a carpet shall we get for the parson's study 2" asked a 
church committeeman of his colleague. " Axminister," was the compre- 
hensive reply. The best furniture for a study, or any other room, is man- 
ufactured by N. P. Cole, 220 to 220 Bush street. It is unrivaled in the 
city. 

A social club strikes a stranger favorably. 



What is Fashion ? Dinners at night and headaches in the morning. 
A bottle of Napa Soda will soon cure the headache, however, and put the 
system to right as well. It is the moat perfect copper-cooler known to 
science. 

Ia the ' ' real onld Irish potheen " taxed yet 1 No ! its illicit still. 
F. & P. J. Cassin, 523 Front street, keep some of the best " potheen " 
ever tasted. Their stock of liquors is remarkably pure, which accounts 
for their large family trade. Good liquors and moderate prices is the 
motto of the firm. 

Heaven has no sorrow that money can heal. 



"I've taken to the study of my own heart," said an old miser. 
"Well," said his nephew, "I never supposed youd spend money for a 
microscope." The best microscopes and optical goods of all kinds are to 
be found at Muller's, the optician, on Montgomery street. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORY. 

I)R. HUNTEK'S PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS. 
nnoronto s.i i <>i Medicine, Toronto, JdIJ ilcli. isiis..-. 

1 I certify i ... ; m. .,,.,. | ■ 
tuuon loi . , 

ii,. Hi Hi a Boon) tor Dppet Cauda. n 11 WHIOHT, u.D . 

i 
Dr. UuiiUir let la il ' I'o t»tnrol ., , i,, 

TEETH SAVED! 

I/MlUnic i. ...in n Speefnlty.— Great pix / extended i,> 
;:..:. | 

1 I iguu n I. in .1. i .t.. i ii: ■ ■ 

Suitor stfast, above jJuneO.] DR. M"i.iii.w, xjontlst 

DR, J. H. STAL1ARD, 
ember or the Royal College of Pnyalciana, London, ete., 

author ol " Pemali Kygiens on the Paaiflo coast" ::. Poll street. Offlci 
Uoura, [2 to :; ;m<l T to s r.u. vt m I 



M 



ARTIFICIAL TBETH. 

Beautiful celluloid platen made by I»r. Jcpmnp, corner 
SMUT illl.l Mi. lit;. .TV stlVi.K ,Lt -LIU :, :-, , . .1, '" ,,|, , ,,,1 I-, .ill- null' ruli- 

ber, iiinl the color of tln_- Daturalgura. Feb, Se\ 

PHYSICIAN, 8UROEOH AXD ACCOI < HEIR, 

J. J. AUERBACH. M.D., 
Dfarcb 13. 310* Stockton street. San FrandBCO. 

STEELE'S SQUIRREL POISON. 
[Patented October IMS, 18T5.] 
tire death to Squirrels, Rats, Gophers, etc. Tor sale l»y all 

_J Druggists, Qrocersand General Healers. L'riee, si per box. Uade l.\ JAMES 
G. STLELL & CO., Sim Francisco, Cal. Liberal iliseount to the Trade. Aug, 21. 

0. F. ~WARREN, M.lT 

Eclectic Physician, corner ol' Fonrteeuth and Broadway, 
Oakland. June 17. 

N. MILLER, M.D., 
T>Iiys>cian, Oakland. Oflice, loot Broadway ; Residence, 304 



s° 



liliLTiiLli street. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



D. F. Hctcuings. 



J. SA.NDEIWON. 



E ! 



D. M. DONNE. 

PH03NIX OIL WORKS. 
stablished 1850.— llntchings A- Co., Oil aiifl Commission 

Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 



Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco, 



Jan. 8. 



J. C. MESBILL & CO. 

Wholesale Auction House, 20-1 and 206 California street. 
Sale days, Wednesdays and Saturdays at JO A.M. Cash advances on consign, 
ruents. Dec. 14. 

CHABLE3 LE liAV, 
American Commission Merchant. - - 1 Rue Scribe, Paris. 

WHOLESALE CROCERS. 



Newton Boom, C. T. Wheeler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W. W. Donee, S. F 
W. W. DGDtiE & CO., 



W 



holesale Grocers, corner Front and Clay sUx-vds, San 

Francisco. April 1. 



L. H. Newton.] 



REMOVAL. 

NEWTON BFOTHEES & CO., 



jfMWrs JfBWTOX. 



JSiRTJCE, 



Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, have removed to 204 and 2utf California street, Sau Francisco, Cal- 
i fornia. June 1. 

TABEE, HAEKEB & CO., 

Successors to Phillips, Taber A Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, 108 and 110 California street, bclmv Front, San Francisco. April 15. 

A- S. EOSENBATJM & CO., 

Southeast corner of California and Battery streets^ invite 
the attention of their customers and others to their lary;e assortment of the 
Best and Finest Brands of CHEWING and SMOK1NCJ TOBACCO, HAVANA CIGARS 
and CIGAKITOS. Consign men ts of Choicest Brands of Cijrars received by every 
Steamer. [Oct. 18 ] A. &. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

a^PRINTSIl 

537 SACRAMENTO STREET. 
BELOW MONTGOMERY. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, l' i receive subscriptions and donations, and t . > furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCUKRIE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

San Francisco. [May Si^ 

CASTLE BR0THEBS.-- [Established, 1850.] 

Importers of Teas and £ast India Goo:ls, Nos.213 auil 215 
Front street, San Francisco. -San. 13. 

PERSONS VISITING THE EAST 

Will find full flies of Pacific Coast papers and conve- 
niences for letter writing, etc., at Wells, Fargo & Co. *s Office-, (55 Broadway, 
New York. March i}5. 

REMOVAL. 
ntro & Co. have removed to No. 10S Montgomery street, 

opposite, J an - 6. 



S 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



THE FESTIVE SEASON. 
The subjoined, on the late festive seaaun, is from the Pall Mall Ga- 
ette: 

The world prepares its solemn celebration, 

Of that awed vifjil of the shepherd throng, 
To whom the Aiurels of the Incarnation 

Sang, glory-girdled, the redemption song. 
But who that hears those jubilant evangels, 

Proclaimed this year in lifted Christmas- hymn, 
Looks for a Heaven made white with hovering angels, 

And vocal with the strains of Seraphim? 
The sky is low with clouds of darkest presage, 
The Saved are making ready to destroy — 
And though mankind stands waiting for a message, 

It counts on no "good tidings of great joy." 
"Ring out, wild bells!" ring from a thousand steeples 
If not a Christmas-chime, a tocsin then! 
Our "Peace on earth's" the din of arming peoples, 

"Down with the Moslem!" our "Good will to men!" 



ART JOTTINGS. 

The new galleries of the Art Association are now about ready for the 
reception of pictures, and the artists have evidently been preparing for 
the next exhibition by putting out but little fresh work since the holi- 
days. It is generally believed that there exists a better feeling among the 
artists, since it is made clear that the School of Design can no longer ex- 
clude them from the gallery, and there will be no excuse now for their 
not contributing their best work to the exhibitions, instead of exhibiting 
in the private galleries. There are artists enough here to keep the gallery 
reasonably supplied with fresh pictures all the time, so as to make, as 
near as possible, a continuous public exhibition, where visitors from 
abroad and from the interior can always be certain of gaining admission, 
affording, too, a steady revenue to the Association. 

It is stated that the Association goes into the new quarters free of debt, 
and there is a large sum in the treasury, obtained from the sale of life 
memberships, which is sacredly kept as a building fund, so that whenever 
the society receives as a gift a building lot from some wealthy patron of 
the tine arts, the means will, in good pat% be at hand with which to erect 
a suitable building. 

The exhibition opens to members on Wednesday evening, and to the 
general public on and after Thursday. , 

LIES OP THE DAY. 

San Francisco Lies. — It is not true that Dr. Bronson, late of Vir- 
ginia City (now here), and who acquired a fortune out of the bonanza 
mines, is bearing the bonanza from sheer vexation, having lost all his 
money in trying to kick over the milking " pail." The doctor's diploma 
is a good one, although his pursuits are, of course, conjectural, and so, in 

a certain degree, are mining stocks. ■ — That H. S s, J. B 1, H. 

F in and J. B 1, jr., after standing outside for two hours, went 

away with the firm conviction that they had attended the Lombard- 
street party. 

Don't go to sleep during the first part of your minister's sermon. 
At least pay him the compliment of supposing that he will be both in- 
structive and entertaining. If, however, after fifteen minutes you feel 
drowsy you can go to sleep with a quiet conscience, because you have 
given him a fair chance to keep you awake, and he couldn't do it. 

"Oh, I've loved before !" said a woman to her fourth husband, as 
she took a handful of hair from his head because he objected to hang out 
the week's washing. 

J. M. Litchfield & Co. are positively selling out their-ready-made 
clothing. 

LITEST PRICES OF IMPORT AND EXPORT STA LEo. 



MBTALS. 

Pig Iron, Scotch, No. 1... 
Bur Iron, assorted,? 1 ft.. 
Metal Sheathing,** ft.... 
Tin Plates. I C,"¥ box... 
Tin Plates. I X,^box... 

Lead, Pig, # ft 

Lead, Sheet, $ ft 

BancaTin, $ ft 

Quicksilver 

COAL. 

West Hartley, #ton 

A us trnl ian 

Curaberl and 

Anthracite 

Belliuyham Hay 

Mount Diablo 

COFFEE. 

Guatemala, # ft 

Java, Old Government.. 

Manila 

Costa Kica 

BICE 

China, No. 1, * ft „ 

Cbina.No.2 

Hawaiian 

WINES. 

Champagne, # doz 

Port, according to brand 

* gallon 

Slierry.do. do 

OIL. 

Coal and Kerosene 



PRICES. 

>30 00 @ 34 (P 

— 3 @— S% 

— ■iO @ — 22 

7 .'0 @ 8 SO 
10 5J @ 

— 6 © — ti>S 
@ _ lo 

— 25 ® 

-45 Yi% 

8 50 is. 9 00 
8 ,5 ® 9 00 

14 OJ © 17 00 

13 00 © 14 00 

yi.O ® 

5 75 @ 7 75 



— 2) 


a. - 


21 


— 23 


lU- 


24 


— 19 


rt- 


20 


- ai 


a _ 


22 


- 5<4s>- 


— 


- 5543- 




— 5} 


ta- 


6 



2 00 ® 6 75 
1 75 @ 7 00 

— 43 © — 50 



TEAS. 

Japans 

Oolong 

SUGARS. 

China, No. l.¥ ft 

Sandwich Island 

Manila 

Crushed, American 

Mnscovado 

Peruvian 

CANDLES. 

Sperm Was,?* ft 

Adamantine 

SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS. 

Whisky, Aim:] iean 

Whisky, Scotch 

Whisky Irish 

Alcohol, American 

li u in, Jamaica 

U randy, French 

BAGS AND BAGGING. 

Chicken Gunnies 

Gunny Bags in bales 

Burlap Bags 

Hessian, 45-lnch,¥ yard. 

DOMESTIC STAPLES. 

Wool, %t ft 

Tallow 

Hides 

Wheat,?* 100 fts 

Barley 

Oats 

Flour. ¥» 1U6 fts 



prices, 

S— SO @ — 50 

— 45 @ — 5.'. 

— 9 @ — 10H 

— 8 © — \0X 

— 7 ©— 7* 

— 13 ©— 13' a 

— ®— 8 

— ©— 10 

— 30 @ — 42 

— 12X® — 16 

2 25 @ 5 50 

5 00 ® 5 50 

5 00 @ 5 50 

2 25 ® 2 40 

4 50 @ 5 25 

4 00 © 10 00 

— 11 © 



2 10 @ 2 15 

1 20 © I 30 

2 «l @ 2 25 
5 00 © 7 00 



S. F. & N. P. R- R. 

(Ihaugre of Time. — On and after Monday, January 1st, 
j the steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE, Captain W. Warner, will leave Green- 
street wharf , daily (Sundays included^, at 3 p.m., connecting at Donahue with cars 
for Cloverdale and intermediate stations. Connection made at Fulton with the 
Fulton and Guemville Branch to Korbel's Mills and the Great Redwood Forests. 
The train leaves Cloverdale daily (Sundays included), at 6 A.M., connecting with 
steamer at Donahue for San Francisco. Close connections made with stages for So- 
uoma, the Geysers, Ukiah, Clear Lake, Mendocino, Mark West, Skaggs' and Littons' 
Springs. Freight received on wharf from 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Scxday Tkii-s— Until 
further OOttee, the steamer will leave Green-street Wharf every Sunday at '6 p.m. fur 
Cloverdale and wav stations. General Office, 426 Montgomery street. 

A. A, BEAN', Superintendent. P. DONAHUE, President. 

Jan. 13. P. E. DOUGHERTY, Gen'l Pas. & Ticket Agent. 



ARE THEY QUACKS? 

" When patients comes lo I, 

I physics, blef-ds and sweats 'em ; 
Then, if they choose to die, 
What's that lo I — I let's 'em." — I. Lettsom, 1770. 

Gentlemen, You Call Yourselves Doctors: have You Diplomas*. 
Anderfon, R. C„ 403 3d and 75»fc Mla'n. i Miller, J. A , Havwarns. 

1 Miller, Sr., Charles L , 405 Kearny. 



Avechisa, Vinccnr, Green above K rny. 

Baionidis, G. W., 518 Green. 

tBarticlt. Mr*. A. W. M.. 29 OFarrell. 

Blach, Carl. 514 Kearny. 

B«-t9, — ■ — , on Die wins. 

Bryant. J G, 42H Kearny. 

Browne, J. M. F. 

Clark, Jena than. State Senator Humb'dt 

Cowan, Robert H,, 207 Kearny. 

Clawson, J. W. C, pone lo Arizona. 

Chapman, C. B., 824 Montgomery. 

Crooker, M. J..S21 Marker. 

Curtis, Alvali, Oakland. 

Cobb, A. J., 7tb street, Oakland. 

Cornell, Japon L, 420 Kearny. 

Chamberlain, B. A.. 709 Mission. 

Evan?, T. W., 473 7lh st. Oakland. 

Evory, A. F.. part nostrums, 008 M'ket. 

Flattery, Jonathan, Bush, below 
Montgomery. 

Fisb, L. VV\, 100 Stockton. 

Gottschalk, Mary, 015 Larkin. 

Hendee, M. J., Mission and Third. 

Hobbs, — , Los Anseles. 

Hill, A. B., 187 Montgomery. 

Hill, R. B., on 'he wing. 

Hohvig, Friedrich, N.E. Polb& JackBon. 

H iiber, David, Santa Clara. 

Hamilton, L. H., 209 Kearnv. 

Haskell, J. S., 540 Howard. 

Hamilton, M. A,, traveling aroand. 

Henderson, Georjre W\, Chico. 

Harm, , 1010 Pacific. 

Joscelyn, "W. Robert, 118 Post 

Joecetyn, Aidrich, 118 Post. 

Johnson, P. T., 104 Kearny. 

Krocholm, . 

Koon, J. M., Grayson, Cal. 

tKellog", M. G-, Direc'r Cal. Med. Soc, 
etc., Red Men's Ha'l, Post st. 

Lanszweert, Louis. 400 Fourth. 

Lindenield, Nicolas, Los Angelea. 

Maxwell, , 114 Geary. 

Miliken, A, Redwood City. 

Mayer, H. E., " French " nostrnm ped- 
dler, 7 Geary. 

McBride, J. J., etc., 534 Market. 

Miller, J. A., San Leandro. 

Mnndy, , Colusa. 

Moore, S.,31 Second. 



tMonre,D. C.,10 Post. 

tMonre, Ellen, 10 Post. 

Matthews, Charles. 

*Osbourne, Wm , 6th and Folsom. 

Preshaw, R. G., on the wing. 

Preshaw, Mrs. S. G., on the wing. 

Pratt, P., with "King of Pain." 

Percy, P., on the Wing. 

Priug, E.J. ,629 Clay. 

Rutley, J. H., nostrum peddler, 745 
Mission and 405 Kearny. 

Rowe, J. L., 220 Third. 

Rahiigliuti, N., S19 Montgomery. 

Reed, Ambrose M., B'dway &23d. O'kd. 

Renken, Henry, 9th and B'dway, OakPd. 

Handle, P. W. 

Rider, Fred, 504 Bnsh. 

Steele, Emma, 506 Third. 

Sturjlan, Benj.. 049 Howard. 

tSmith, Barlow J., 035 California. 

Suclttzer, ■ , traveling about. 

Spinney, A. B., 11 Kearny. 

Steinhart, P-, 420 Kearny. 

Simmons, alias Carl, 777 Market. 

Smith, \Y. D., Calistoya. 

St Clair, A. E., on the wing. 

Say re, Chas. James, Delegate of "Amer- 
ican University." 

Snell, E., San Jose. 

Schlotterback, , traveling around. 

Taylor, W. C, Chico. 

Thiele, Emil, 1220 Eddy. 

Tirjemon, , 405 Kearny. 

Thoiusen, N. L., 74 Fourth. 

Trask, Edw., Nucleus Hotel 

TTruesdell, A. P. 

*Van Den Bergh, J. P. P., Mission be- 
low Third. 

Van Den Bergh, Albert. 

Vundenbergh, L. C, 710 Montgomery. 

Wight man, Thomas F., Cosmopolitan. 

Wood, Wm. H., 01 Second. 

Walkejb, Mary K., 110 Sixth. 

Woody, J. H., Lick House. 

Webber, R., 328 Kearny. 

Wolff, Max, 5 Telegraph Place. 

Yeaton, George A., alias Henry Clay 
Wilkins, Bigamist, Wat?onville. 



Young. J. C, OlSSacramento. 
Those persons whose names appear in small capitals claimed to have diplomas 
from institutions whose officers repudiate tho*e claims. 

♦Claims a diploma from the Quack Medical School of Philadelphia, that sold them. 
tClaims diplomas from the Hygcio Therapeutic Water Cure College in New York. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's steamers will sail ns follows at 12 M. : 
CITY 0FTOK1O, March 1st, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, February 10th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, call- 
ing at MAZATLAN, SAN BLAS, MANZAN1LLO and ACAPULCO, connecting at Ae- 
apulco with company's steamer for all Mexican and Central American ports south of 
Aeapulco. Tickets to and from Europe by any liue for sale. 

ZEALAND1A, Februarv 3d, at o'clock p M., or on arrival of the English mails 
for HONOLULU, KANUAYAU, AUCKLAND, SYDNEY and PORT CHALMERS. To 
Sydney or Auckland —Upper Saloon, £210; Lower Saloon, £200. 

CITY OF PANAMA, Feb. 10th, DAKOTA, Feb. 20th, and alternately on the 10th, 
20th and 30th of each month, for VICTORIA, POUT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, TA- 
COMA and OLYMPIA, connecting' at TACOMA with Northern Pacifie Railroad for 
PORTLAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing. 

For freight or passage apply at the office, corner of First and Brannan streets 

February 3. WILLIAMS. BLANCHARD & CO., A genta, ■ 

FOB ARIZONA AND MEXIC&N POETS. 

For Cape San I.ikhs, l,a Paz, Mazatlau, Guaymas ami the 
Colorado River, touching at Magdalena Bay, should sufficient inducement 

offer. — The Steamship NEWBORN, Master, will leave for the above 

ports on TUESDAY, Feb. 10th, at 12 o'clock St., from Folsom-st. Wharf, connect- 
ing at the Mouth of the Colorado River with the Steamboats and Barges of the Colorado 
Steam Navigation Company for all points on the River. Through Bills of Lading 

will be furnished and none others signed. Freight will be received on 

No freight received for Mexican Ports after , at 12, noon, and Bills 

of Lading for those ports must be accompanied by Custom House and Consular Clear- 
ances. Si-kcial Notice : No freight for Mexican Ports will be received on board 
of this Steamer without an order from this office. For freight or passage apply to 
January 20. J. BERMIXGHAM, Agent, 10 Market str eet. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Ijlor Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
1 nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONUKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

OCEANIC January 10th, April 17th, Julv 17th and October 16th. 

BELGIC February 10th, Mav 10th, August 16th and November 16th. 

GAELIC March 16th, June 16th, September 18th and December 18th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 4 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, pplyatthe Pacifie Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY', President. Dec 23. 

OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Regular Steamers to Portland, leaving 1 San Francisco 
weekly Steamers GEORGE \V. ELDER, J. L. STEPHENS, ORIFLAMME, 
and A JAX, connecting with steamers to SITKA and PUGET SOUND, and O. and C. 
R. R. Co. and Oregon C. R. R. Co. through Willamette, Umpqua, and Rogue River 
Valleys, Oregon. Tickets to all points on the O. and C R R. sold at reduced rates. 

K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent, 
June 14. 210 Battery street. 

FOR PORTIAND, OREGON. 
he Only Direct Line.- -Steamship George W. fclder. Con- 



T 



nor, Commander, leave 
Feb. 3. 



Folsom-street wharf. SATURDAY, Feb. 3d, at 10 a. : 
K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent, 210 Battery st. 



OFFICES OF TH£ AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO., 

No. 607 to 615 Merchant street, san Francisco* 



Feb. B, 1877. 



< A I LFORNIA Al»\ ERTISER. 



13 



BETTER NOT. 

Ve:,r 

Drawetfa n< 
Let '■ be fire, 

nqutrs 

II ffl ' !:■ b >!■'". Of Lil 

Half in doubt, 
Ir" the rtorj ol oar trading will be bad, 

■ turniiu- "i the crowded pages ihowa 
■ 
Thai our fingers long t.« wrench away and I 

I lid we dare; 
But the figures thai are written must remain, 
I . m a sain, 
the Ledgei is as heavy aa a "Kruppw" 

slmt it up! Pun. 

THE MISSING LINK IN SAN FRANCISCO. 
The subject ol the illustration in our hut week's issue seems to have 
awaki ned a holy sense of gratitude in the breasts of the venerable "Pick" 
and the " Deacon. 11 With a power of penetration <>f which we bad bardly 
deemed them capable, they cudra to have recognised in the two venerable 
in ti;.- picture "f the " Miming Link their own originals, and 
hasten to congratulate us on our artistic taste. That they were indeed 
the models, it would be impossible to deny; but that the fault is entirely 
<hi<- to Dame Nature's caprice, and not to our imitative faculty, must be 
sufficient apology. So intensely Battered do they Eeel by thus being al- 
lowed to take their stand amongst the "Men we Know/' that in an 
unusual moment <>f effusive generosity they have Forwarded to our office a 
bundle of soul saving tracts and an accompanying basket of chloral- 
hydrate. The ft I n suit >-f the former is plainly visible in the excep- 
tionally religious tone of this week's issue, and though people sometimes 
thmk they :<!-•■ pious, when, in fact, they are only biUiuus, the depressed 
state of our editorial stomach joints strongly to the latter as the only 
However much we in.iy he drawn at times into trifling differences 
with our feUow-mortalaj none can be more ready than ourselves to make 
the amendt honorabte, and nn an occasion of this kind, if any offence has 
been given, any odious comparison instituted, we can only, in a manly 
and straightforward spirit, tender every reasonable apology— to the 
gorilla ! 

Seme weeks ago we exposed the Lns comb -Thorn ton partnership and 
their treatment of a poor man staying at the International Hotel, who 
had been •■■!}>/>"/ into their Institute^). The result of our expose was that 
.Doctor Thornton published in the Ghrenicfo of the following morning a 
statement of his dissolution of partnership with Mixta- Luscomb. The 
public must not, therefore, think that these two men are not working to- 
gether any longer, for they are. They still carry on the same old game of 
touting for countrymen who come to the city to get treated for their ail- 
and who lodge at the more moderate priced hotels. This week 
three more men came to us to ask advice. Their statement was that 
they were induced l.y a gentleman stopping at the International Hotel 
(the tale is always the same) to visit Dr. Thornton, who never charged 
anything for an examination and was an excellent physician. He (the 
capper] had been very sick, but was being rapidly cured, and was just 
going for his medicine. The old, old story! Mr. <.)., one of our inform- 
ants, showed us a receipt for 8100; Mr. M., another gentleman, had paid 
950, and the third dupe $40. None uf the three men had been benefited 
by the medicine, and all had discarded it. They had all seen Luscomb 
there, and s:il that be represented himself aa Thornton's assistant, or 
businessman. We repeat the expose in the hope that it ma\* catch the 
eye of some fool who might otherwise be ensnared into this Luscomb- 
Thomton den. ________^^^__ 

The Return of Captain McDonald. -In answer to numerous inqui- 
ries as to the prosperity of <':i]>r;nn Mi-Donald's braves in their adopted 
land, we are enabled to <|iiote from the Captain's latest dispatches. That 
they have quickly assimilated themselves to the English habits is proved 
by the fact of their frequent invitation to dinner with "Wales," and, 
with the exception of an occasional outbreak of their native peculiarities, 
induced by Royal liquor, they seem to comport themselves in a most sat- 
isfactory manner. By latest accounts the victims of these playful experi- 
ments were rapidly decreasing' in number, and they were gradually leav- 
ing the subtle differences that exist in that country between meum and 
tinmi, in relation to the ownership of scalps in particular. The announce- 
ment of a matrimonial alliance between one of their number and the 
daughter of a noble Earl, is, however, devoid of truth, owing to the fact 
that the expectant bridegroom having breakfasted off the Earl's Chap- 
Iain, found to bis disgust that all little eccentricities of that nature had to 
be practiced strictly subrosa. As arule, however, their morals were most 
exemplary. 

A Novel Danger.— Mr. James Greenwood calls attention, remarks the 
British Medical Journal, to the very common and dangerous practice of 
obtaining novels from the circulating library for the use of invalids re- 
covering from infectious diseases, and returning them without being 
properly disinfected. We do not know whether the full extent of this 
danger has ever occurred to Mr. Mudie, but it is no doubt a rather seriouB 
one. It might be obviated by establishing" an invalids' library." Mean- 
time it maybe well to warn the good-natured friends of such invalids 
that the practice of returning" such novels into circulation in this un- 
guarded way exposes them to a penalty of £5, and that the proprietors of 
a library are not, we imagine, altogether free from legal responsibility if 
it can be shown that they are the conscious accomplices of the act. 



A young man refused to attend church because his new clothes had 
not been sent home. "I hate the devil and all his works," he said, 
" but I hate an old-fashioned coat more." The newest styles of all cloth- 
ing, the best workmanship in the city, moderate priecs, and a perfect fit, 
are all guaranteed by J. M. Litchfield & Co., corner Sansome and Wash- 
ington. Their new style overcoats are a marvel. 

The ready-made clothing of J. M. Litchfield & Co. fits better than 
the custom-made of many large tailors. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOE WEEK ENDING FEB. 2, 1877. 



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Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 

A smart school-boy says it takes thirteen letters to spell cow, and 
provesit thus: "See O! double you. 1 ' 



14 



SAK FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



COURT CHAT, 

And the Upper Ten Thousand at Home and Abroad. 

A very valuable ' ' sword of honor " was presented to Emperor 
William on New Year's Day by the veterans of his army on the occasion 
of the completion of his 70th year of military service. The sword was 
made by Messrs. Sy and Wagner, of Berlin, after a design by Herr A. 
Wagner. The hilt, the scabbard, and the belt and chain are of massive 
gold. The ornaments are in the Romanic style of the 13th century, the 
emblematical tigures introduced purely classical. The hilt is of considera- 
ble thickness, just capable of being grasped. It has on either side a niche 
lined with blue enamel, and setting off the figures of '"Germania " and 
" Borussia " placed within them. Nearer the top end are four medallions 
representing emblematically the four cardinal virtues— Strength, with a 
club and a bull ; Justice, with balance and sword ; Perseverance, with a 
stone wall ; and Magnanimity, with a lion. The figures are designed by 
Calendrelli. The pommel is embellished on either side with the triangle 
emitting rays of light, symbolical of the eye of God ; the rays are repre- 
sented by strings of brilliants. The scabbard is gold fret-work and crim- 
son velvet ; the metal-work, which is solid gold, representing garlands of 
laurel leaves. The blade of the best damask steel, manufactured at Solin- 
gen. The names of the twenty-six battles in which the Emperor has 
taken part are engraved upon it, surrounded by laurel wreaths. The belt 
and chain are embellished with figures of knights and dragons set off by 
blue enamel. 

The following is the text of Queen Victoria's telegraphic message to 
the potentates assembled at Delhi on the occasion of the declaration of 
her imperial authority: "We, Victoria, by the grace of God of the 
United Kingdom Queen, Empress of India, send through our Viceroy to 
all our officers, civil and military, and to all Princes, Chiefs, and peoples, 
now at Delhi assembled, our Royal and Imperial greeting, and assure 
them of the deep interest and earnest affection with which we regard the 
people of our Indian Empire. We have witnessed with heartfelt satisfac 
tion the reception which they have accorded to our beloved son, and have 
been touched by the evidence of their loyalty and attachment to our 
House and Throne. We trust that the present occasion may tend to unite 
in bonds of yet closer affection ourselves and our subjects, that from the 
highest to the humblest all may feel that, under our rule, the great prin- 
ciples of liberty, equity, and justice, are secured to them, and that to pro- 
mote their happiness, to add to their prosperity, and advance their wel- 
fare, are the ever present aims and objects of our Empire. 

The season at Nice is now later than formerly, but it gets into swing 
about the middle of December. The hotels are well filled ; prices are much 
the same as in Paris or London ; and apartments are perhaps a little 
cheaper than they were. The Italian Opera is very fair, the best artist 
being Signor Adolfi. Among the things that distinguish Nice besides the 
beauty of its site and its delightful climate is the great number of all sorts 
and conditions of men of many countries and very varied distinction who 
select it, after an interrupted or completed career, as a place of residence 
— discrowned Sovereigns, retired Hospodars, and Ministers of State. 
There are here at least three Ministers of France— two of Louis Philippe's 
and one of Napoleon III. — not to mention Baron Haussmann, whose 
villa was formerly occupied by Garibaldi, and to which he has added one 
of the most remarkable gardens in this region of gardens ; also literary 
men who have made a name in the world, and Generals who will live in 
history, the last who has made a stir being General Klapka." 

The latest novelty in Paris life is due to the Princess Lepanine, one 
of the leaders of society, a Russian lady of wealth and beauty. She has, 
whether in humility or from a desire for distinction, temporarily given up 
driving horses in her carriage, and appears daily in the Champs Elysees 
and Bois de Boulogne in a low brake to which are attached four donkeys 
in scarlet trappings. The princess drives herself, and it must be added 
that the donkeys are as fine as Egypt could produce, so that she has no 
difficulty in keeping pace with the most rapid horse-drawn carriage, whilst 
her " cattle " are as high-stepping and showy as any of her rivals. It 
would be interesting to see whether, in the event of the Princess Lepa- 
nine coming to London for the season and driving her four-in-hand, what 
would be the opinion of the judges of this kind of flesh. 

The Empress Eugenie and her son do not seem to have benefited 
their cause by their visit to Home. The Prince Imperial appears to have 
astounded every one by his excessive naivete. He asked General Kanzler 
as he entered the Vatican whether the gorgeously-attired guards were the 
" Pontifical Zouaves."' On learning that they were not the same heroes 
who were so unsuccessful at Castelfidardo, he supposed that they were 
paid by King Victor Emmanuel, and asked whether the King kept up a 
large army for the Pope's body-guard. M. Veuillot sneers at the Imperial 
visit to the Vatican. The Univers says that the Prince was remarked for 
his " taciturnity." His father certainly possessed la faeulte de se taire, and 
seldom spoke save to disguise his thoughts, a quality which his son seems 
not to have inherited. 

In the days of the late empire, a certain dissipated French duke set 
the pearl of his picture-gallery — a tine Meissonier— in the lid of a New 
Year's casket as an offering to one of the queens of the demi-monde, who, 
indignant at receiving nothing better than a box of candies from her prod- 
igal and profligate admirer, when she had counted upon a set of diamonds 
at the very least, flung the whole affair straight out of the window. 
Months afcer, the box, with its precious painting still intact upon the 
cover, was discovered in a bric-a-brac shop near the Temple, was pur- 
chased for a mere song, and the Meisspnnier, cleaned and refrained, now 
figures honorably in a well-known private gallery in England. 

Prince Frederick William and Henry of Prussia, both grandsons of 
Queen Victoria, are about to pass their examination of "maturity" be- 
fore quitting the gymnasium of Cassel, in the present month. The princes 
on this account left Berlin immediately after the Emperor's fete. Prince 
Frederick William, the elder of the two, is about to serve with the "body 
company " of the First Prussian Regiment of Foot Guards, in order to 
make himself practically acquainted with military service. The Prince 
will be stationed at Potsdam. He is to have a separate establishment. 
Prince Henry, being destined for the naval service, is about to pass 
through a course of instruction at the Naval Academy at Kiel. 

Three hundred bouquets, sprinkled with diamonds, was what Patti 
had to hop over to get off the stage at her'Moscow benefit. 



BROKERS. 



R. C. Hookkr, Thomas Gahdixkr, 

Member S. E. Stock and Exchange Board. Late of the Sacramento " Union." 

GARDINER & HOOKER. 
4 Commission S took Brokers, 336 Pine street, north side? one 

'Ly door below Montgomery, San Francisco, Cal. Buy aud sell only on commiusion. 
Liberal advances made on active accounts. Dec. 23. 

REMOVAL ! 

JW. Brown A Co., Stock and Money Brokers, have re* 
• moved to No. 317 Montgomery strcot, Nevada Block, 
J. W. Brown, Member S. F. Stock and Exchauge Board. Jau 8. 

J. K. S. Latham.] LATHAM & KING, [Homer S. King. 

Successors to Jaines H'. Latham A Co., Stock and Money 
Brokers, 411 California street, San Francisco. Member S. F. Stock aud Exchange 
Board. Stocks bought and carried on margins. Aug. 12. 

HUBBARD & CO., 

(Commission Stock Brokers, 324 1-2 Montgomery street, nn- 
J der Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco, will transact business through the 

San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board. July 17. 

E. P. PECKHAM, 
/Commission Stock Broker and Member S. F. Stock Ex> 

*- / change, 413 California street. Stocks bought, sold and carried. Liberal ad- 
vances made on active accounts. Orders receive prompt execution and return. 
[June. 19. ] 

D. M. Hosmer.] HOSMER & BOURNE, IJ B. Bourse. 

Stock Brokers, 116 llalleck street, San Francisco. Post- 
office Address, Lock Box 1837. March 25. 

REMOVAL. 

Lovelaud, David A Co., from 108 LeidesdorflT street to No. 
421 California street, corner Leidcsdorff. Feb. 26". 

VERDICT ALWAYS FOR THE DAVIS' VERTICIL FEED SEWING 

MACHINE. 

The Centennial Gold Medal and Diploma. 1S76; the Scott 
Medal, 1875 ; the Franklin Institute Medal, 1874. The Report of the Centennial 
Commission sa,\s : "The DAVIS is awarded the Grand Gold Medal of Honor and 
Diploma of Merit for excellent material and construction, adapted to the greatest 
range of work." We claim sales unprecedented, and satisfaction universal. In its 
construction it differs from all others, and is equaled by none.- As an earnest of what 
is here claimed, the Manufacturers challenge all others for a friendly contest, either 
for amusement or a more substantial consideration. The Family Machine is light 
running and easily comprehended ; has an ingenious device "to take up" lost motion 
or wear, which, to a machinist, is positive proof of durability. We ure pleased to 
refer to machines in manufacturing establishments here, where they have been in 
constant use for nearly three years, to verify the above. Has received more medals 
and complimentary testimonials than any other in the same length of time. Manu- 
facturers are especially invited to examine our No 1, just out. Agents wanted in 
all unoccupied territory. MARK SHELDON, GenT Agent for the Pacific Coast, 
D ec. 23. No. 130 Post stre et. 

A. S. HALLID B, 

Importer, Dealer and Manufacturer or Wire Goods, Wire 
Rope, Wire Screens, Iron and Brass Battery Cloth, etc. Wire S-reens for win- 
dows aud doors, and all kinds of Wire Work on hand and made to order. Sole Agent 
for Torrey's Weather Strips, to exclude dust and rain, and Holloway's Fire Extin- 
guisher. Proprietor of the Patent Endless Ropeway. Experienced workmen always 
on hand to fit up orders. California Wire Works : CALIFORNIA ST. Dec. 23. 

F. C. Snow.] SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. [W. B. May. 

SNOW A MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pictures. Frames, Moldings, and Artists* Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



OPENING OF RARE AND ELEGANT BOOKS! 

HH. Moore takes pleasure in announcing 1 that having' re- 
s turned from his annual purchasing trip to the great Eastern and European 
Literary Depositories, that he has received and now has open the largest assortment 
of ANTIQUE and MODERN LITERATURE ever before brought to this city, con- 
sisting of many old and rare books, and other novelties in literature. No one can 
fail to find the most acceptable HOLIDAY PRESENT for either old or young, male or 
female, amongst our varied stock. Gift Books in Great Variety. Call and examine 
our stuck. [Dec. 16 j H. H. MOORE, 600 Montgomery street. 

AN EXTRAORDINARY RAZOR 

Has been inventeil by the Queen's Own Company of En- 
gland, the edge and body of which is so thin and flexible as never to require 
grinding, and hardly ever setting. It glides over the faee like a piece of velvet, 
making shaving quite a luxury. It is creating a great excitement in Europe among 
the experts, who pronounce it PERFECT!' >N. 32 for buffalo handles, S3 for ivory ; 
by mail, 10 cents extra. The trade supplied on liberal terms by the sole agents in the 
United States. NATHAN JOSEPH & CO., 

September 2. No. (141 Clay street, S. F. 

TO 0WNEBS OF REAL ESTATE! 

Persons Owning- Real Estate that has heretofore been as- 
sessed in the former owner's name, are requested to appear personally, or send 
their deeds to the Assessor's Office, 644 Merchant street, City Hall, inmiedi itely, and 
have the proper changes made for next year's Roll. The work on the Real Estate 
Roll for ls77 will commence in a few days, after which it will be too late for any 
changes. ALEXANDER BADLAM, 

Jan. 13. City and County Assessor. 

VEHICLE LICENSES. 

License Collector's Office, Room X«. 7, City mall. San Fran- 
cisco, January 4, 1S77. Licenses on Vehicles are now due and payable at this 
office. Will be delinquent on February 1st next, when a penalty will be added. Pro- 
duce Peddlers' and all business licenses for the current quarter arc also due. 
Jan. 13. R. H. SINTON, License Collector. 

WILLIAM HARNEY, 
"Vfotary Public and Commissioner ot Deeds, northwest cor- 

_1^| uer of Montgomery and Sacramento streets, San Francisco, office of Madison 
& Burke. Aprii 29. 

~ QUICKSILVER. 

or sale— In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell, 5To. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



F 



NOTICE. 

For the very best photographs go to Bradley A Rnlofson-s, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



Feb. 8, L8f7. 



< \l [FOUNJ \ ADA EttiTlSER 



I.-. 



SPECIAL BREVITIES. 



It is very »eldom that in I'" dI labor is utilised, but so 

« hich Is wo ! i :it the juno- 

Uon nl V '■ rk*i -i -. I n : ■■■. ha been Istelj ''I oken up, 

sad sn omnibm proceeding from Stunfara -street toward the Wanda* 

■ 
I, snd « bile 1 1**- horses a 
ing in vain t-- get nTer the piece of around •>!!■• «>f Sang* 
, under the charge of akee] lung the road. Seeing the 

jsve instruction! to the elephant, 
who lowered hit head, and, placing t » i — Forehead at the rear of the > mnl 
boa, pushed horses, vehicle, and beyond the obstacle which 

I their progress. This was witnessed bya targe number of per- 
il bo loudly •''•■ ors in this inci I 
A cashier at the Louvre drapery establishment, named Battandier, 
it been tried tor practicing ■ singular fraud on rs deal- 
ing there, ll tving change to commit an inten- 
tional error, generally of a fninc, *•( r.-ur<f rv.-ain-t the purchaser. If the 
buyer j mistake, he corrected it. otherwise li»- appropriated 
the difference. Complaints having been made he was put to the proof, 
prietor to purchs ooda amounting bo 16f. 
i which she tendered a 50f, note, and lie returned only 321 70c. 
h was then set, and he was observed t<> practice the fraud five 
times within an hour. When charged with the act he at length ad- 
mitted it. 
Colonel Home, who superintended the movements <>f the English en- 
en engaged for nearly ;i month in surveying Constan- 
tinople, with the object of urbanizing the defense of thai city, has, during 
tin last week, been in coi stent communication with the War < >ffice. He 
reports thai Constantinople can be rendered impregnable if the plan elab- 
orated by \ "ii Moltke many year ■ - be pui into practice, and he esti- 
mates the number of men required at 60,000. The lines which he has 
.1.* twenty miles in length, and extend from the Sea "f Marmora 
lo the B The officers who accompanied Colonel Some have 
in l honored by the Afahommedansof Constantinople. 

Paul's "warning to p nml Christian women not to marry with unbe- 
lievers, was discussed in Parson Murray's Bible class, the other day, and 
one young woman said bos didn't tliink it was "always in favor of a 
miiI husband because he i^ religious Some of the 
meanest hi abends that I know of among my acquaintances are church 
members; and the stingiest one I know is a deacon. I think ■* young 
girl makes a better match,, so far as her own comfort and happiness go, 
rous, whole-hearted sinner who loves her splendidly, 
\>\ takiiu' a stingy saint." And Mr. Murray seemed to 
think she was right. 

The graduates of Trinity College, Dublin, who art- supposed to con- 
duct the literary part of the New York Beraldj arc masters of elegance. 
The familiar passage of Tennyson — 

*■ An infant crying in the night, 
An infant crying for the light, 
And with no language but a cry — " 
appears thus in an "'interview" furnished to the Iltnthl by one of its 
correspondents: 

"A child crying in the night, 

A child crying for the light, 
And nothing in its language but a cry." 
There was a sensation in a party of converts standing at a Sandusky 
(0.) church chancel rail ready to be made members, when a beautiful girl 
interrupted the ceremony by saying that -she bad a confession of sin to 
make. Every old gossip in the parish was agog on the instant. She said 
Bhe had been married a year; that the ceremony had been regularly but 
privately performed: and that she bud kept the fact a secret because she 
was not ready to forego the fun of going into society as an artless un- 
d maiden. The husband Btepped forward and corroborated the 
wife's story. They went to housekeeping on the following day. 

In spite of the fact that the existing theaters don't have paying houses, 
Strakosch'e scheme for a SI, 000,000 opera house in New York, which 
body called visionary, advances as though it were a reality. Arthur 
Oilman, the architect, has finished the plans for a splendid building in 
the style of the Italian renaissance, with the auditorium of the same 
style and dimensions as that of La Seals at Milan— the most perfect in 
the world — containing 3,000 seats, thoroughly fire-proof in every detail — 
and, in fine, intended to be the model edifice of its kind. 

The Irish Doomsday Book Bhows that 20,157,557 acres of land, 
with a total valuation of £13,418,358, are divided among 68,716 propri- 
etors ; that the owners of "in- acre and under 10 number 6,892, while the 
owners of HH),0H0 acres and upward number only three ; and that the total 
holdings of 1,108 proprietors with between 2,000 and 5,000 acre3 represent 
more than one-sixth of the entire area of the country. 

A lady in Louisville, Kentucky, was robbed a few nights since by a 
man who secreted himself in her chamber until she had retired. The 
box containing her jewelry and that containing her rouge were just alike, 
and the thief took the wrong box. She looked pale on discovering- her 
loss, but her color came again the next day. 

A highly esteemed American pastor was heard to remark the other 
day that he would be very willing for the little girls of the families under 
his care to bring their dolls with them to church, if thereby their imagi- 
nation could be innocently laid hold of and secured as an ally in the for- 
mation of good habits and proper manners. 

Early in the century a rich Englishman left his daughters their weight 
in one-pound bank notes. The elder got £51,200, the younger £57,344. 
The handsomest pair of paper weights on record. 

Miss Sophie Barney took a premium at a Montgomery (Alabama) 
fair as "the young woman who would make the best wife for a poor 
man." 

An apiarian in Utah estimates that one acre of mignonette will fur- 
nish sufficient pasture for one hundred stocks of bees. 

New York City eats 70,000,000 of eggs per year, and several mil- 
lions more are consumed in morning drinks. 



CUTrER WHISKY. 

A i* . iioiiiiiiiu .i ««►.. %«». IB I JiukMiii ■tree*, are ftbc n«»i«> 
» A I \. HIHK1 , ihl] 

I 

it [a reallj the Ban Wtnsai in U« i i 

A. M. OILMAN, 

1 in porter and Wholesale Liquor Dealer) SOS rniifornia 
i , 
10,0 ii- t and Shorry Wines, 8UIt and Bparkllnir Wines, etc Agent (or the 
I CACHE! BLAKi CHAMPAGNE Boh Wont for MILLS' STOMACH 
■ & ■ i. i 

JT. H. CUTTER OLD BOURBON. 

A 1 I*. Moorman «V Co.. Mini u I nvt 11 rers, Louisville. Ky.— 

\y» The nbovo welMcnowu Housi I I hero bj the undei Ignod, rho 

■ d appointed their Sole Agent •■ r tl <■ Pacini l ■ 
July a A. P, UOTALJNG& CO., 120 and 481 Jackson street, s. F. 



WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 



R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

Cliirte lilaiiclii'. the Celebrated Brand of Mr. I, on is Iloedcrcr, 
j *>f Helms, in buml or dutj paid, quarta or pints, for sale to the trade in Iota to 

II \' I INDRAY ft rii. 
Sept. S3, Sole Agents tor the Pacific I 

J. H. C'JTTER'S OLD BOURBON AND BYE WHISKY, 

Manufactured by Milton J. Hard.v A- Co., SniiN.iii.Lnw anil 
Successors n| J, n. CTJTTKR, Louisville, Ky, E. MARTIN fcCO., 

August 1 1. No. 408 l'miit street, Solo Agents (<>r the Pacific Coast 

JOHN BUTLER, 
ealcr In Wines mid Lienors, En;rllsh Ales and Porter, T 

suiter Street and BOO Market street, San Ft ibco Jan. 27. 



D 



JOYJE'S SPOKTING AMMUNITION. 
[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 

The attention of Sportsmen is Invited to tin- following 
Ammunition, of the best Quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterprool -and !■' :i Quality Percussion 
Caps ; Chomically-preparod Cloth and Felt QunWndding; Joyces Qas-Tight Car- 
triages, for Pin*nrc and Central-Sre Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, tor killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
nil gun-makers and dealers in gun] owder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Dec. 30. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 

LEA AND PEERINS 1 SAUCE. 

In consequence of spurious imitations of WORCESTER- 
SEEiUENAl'Ci;. which are calculated to deceive the public, l,EA A>1» 
1'EKICIXS have adopted A NEW LABEL BEARING TIILIK SIGNATURE, 
LEA A PEKKINS, which ia placed on every bottle of WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, 
and without which nuiiu is genuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwefl, 
Loudon, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Dee. 30. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 

CAUTION— BETTS'S PATENT CAPSULES. 

The public nre reauertfnlly cau(ioi-«*fl lh:.< RelflOt 9*:ilcnt Capnulvn 
are being Infringed. BETTS'S name 1b upon every Capsule lie makes lor the 

lending Merchants al home and abroad, and lie- is the Only Inventor and Sole Maker 
In the United Kingdom. Manufactokis: 1. V'daiif Road, Citv Ruad, Lokdok , 
and HommAu.Y, Krakce. June li>. 

ASTHMA AND CHRONIC BRONCHITIS. 

The most cifpctun) remedy will lie found to lie Datnra Tn- 
I iiia. prepared in all forms, tor Bmoking and inhalation, by SAVORY & 
MOORE, 143 New Bond street, London, and sold by them and all Chemists and Store- 
keepers throughout Canada and Uil- United States. Dec. 30. 

FOR SALE. 
Ci X4 \ £\i\4\ First Mortffase Bonds of the Nevada County 

T?p>" 'f^FH/'r Narrow Oaugu Uailroad, running between Colfax, Grass 
Valley, and Nevada City. These bonds run 20 years, from January 1, 1*76, bearing 
interest at the rate of 8 per cent. )>cr annum, payable semi-annually at the bank nf 
Wells, Fargo A; Co., in this citv. No nmrv desirable investment can be offered. Will 
be sold in lots to suit [Sunt. 0.] ANDREW HAlRLi, No. 304 California street. 

NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers and Dealers in Painters' materials. House, Si^n 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jwekson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 

THOMAS DAY, 

Importer of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Oilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full Hoe of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Jan. 27. 



EPPINGEVS SALOON. 

Lonis Cpnln^er, formerly ol II n I leek street, lias removed 
to Nevada Block (entrance on Summer street). Will be happy to see all his 
riends. MILWAUKEE BEER a Specialty. Sept 30. 

B. F. Flint. Flint, Bixby & Co.] [ J. Lee. D. W. Foloer 

A. P. FLINT & CO., 

Graders, Packers and I>ealers in Wool, corner of Battery 
and Greenwich streets. San Francisco. Jan. 29. 

BLANK BOOKS 

Sold from stock or manufactured to order from the Carew 
Extra Fine Ledger Paper, by JOHN G. HODOE & CO., Importers, Manufac- 
turers and Wholesale Stationers, 827, 329 and 331 Sansome street, S. F. Nov. 11. 



R 



HEGHEST AWAKD AND MEDAL 
eceived !>y Buryeas' Celebrated Starch. Henry C. Eg-erton, 

Agent, No 10U California street. Nov. 18. 

P. H. CANAVAN, 
Beal Estate, 521 Montgomery Street. S. F. 

G. G. GAHIBOLDI. 

Fresco and Decoration, Nevada Block, No.'b 73 and 74. 
[January 13.] 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



THE MAN CLAY. 

Hia libel suits against the Hews Letter — His struggle to try a little piece 
of his life, and not the whole— Ee selects the Australian episode, know- 
ing that the legal proofs are not here yet— The News Letter's counsel 
challenges him to an immediate trial of the allegat ors against his 
conduct here, defies him to come on, and says the witnesses are ready- 
It is not the tricks of youth so much as the lcng continued acts of wrong 
of his matured age which counsel says he wants to try — Judge Camp- 
bell's hard nut to crack— Which was too hard for Highton's teeth, 
hence more delay, etc., etc. 
Judge Ferral's commodious court-room, on Wednesday last, pre- 
sented a scene livelier than is common there. The proceedings were of 
more than usual importance, involving in some sense the liberty of the 
press and the honesty of savings banks. The witnesses for the defense 
were numerous, and taken from a class not often found within the pre- 
cincts of a criminal court. Many influential citizens, including merchants, 
bankers, depositors in savings banks, etc., were present, eagerly watching 
the proceedings. The prosecutor evidently did not like the gaze of the 
assembled crowd, for he retired away to the background. The proprietor 
of the Neivs Letter was accompanied by his counsel. Judge Alexander 
Campbell and J. D. Fay. Messrs. Highton and Sieberst appeared at the 
instance of the man Clay, though professedly representing the people. 
There are four indictments for libel against the defendant, all arising out 
of the man Clay's doings. The first in importance is that which attacks 
his acts done in connection with a savings bank in this city. The others 
followed upon that criticism, and consist merely of references to a letter 
received by us from the General Manager of the Union Bank, Melbourne, 
Australia. The News Letter was quite prepared to go to immediate trial 
upon the largest and most important indictment, which involved the whole 
facts, but tbe man Clay, knowing that the proofs from Australia were not 
to hand yet, would only go on first with the indictment referring to his 
transactions there. 

JUDGE Campbell asked the prosecution which indictment they pro- 
posed to proceed with first. 

Mb. Highton replied that they proposed to take up indictment No. 2. 
Judge Campbell said he had only recently come into the case, and had 
not had time to make himself familiar with the whole of the indictments, 
and desired a postponement, though he was quite willing, if necessary, to 
proceed with the indictment, " Clay's Demands Upon Justice," which re- 
ferred to his transactions as Vice-President and Cashier of the Western 
Savings and Trust Company of this 'city. With regard to the other in- 
dictments, it would be necessary that a commission should issue to take 
evidence in Australia. The Court would see that the subject matter of 
the libel which the prosecution desired to go on with originated in Austra- 
lia. Counsel then quoted from the indictments as follows: 

*' The Rotten Bilk," (meaning the said Frederic Clay). 
" The following speaks for itself:" 

" Inspector and Gknkkal Managers' Office, Union Bask of AUSTRALIA, ) 

Meleol'rne, July 15th, 1876. f 
" Editor News Letter: My attention has been called to an article in your journal 
" of May 12th, respecting a party named Frederic Clay (the said Frederic Clay mean- 
" tag), and his connection with several monetary and commercial institutions in Cali- 
" [ornia, in which article it is stated that he (the said Frederic Clay meaning) was at 
" one time a teller in the Union Bank of Australia, and absconded from its service. I 
"cannot, of course, identify tbe person to whom you allude with the Mr. Clay (the 
" said Frederic Clay meaning) who was formerly employed by this bank, but if he be 
"tbe same, the information you have given is substantially correct, and I deem it 
" right to acquaint you that every effort was made to bring him (the said Frederic 
" Clay meaning) to justice. A reward of £100 was offered by the bank for his appre- 
" hension, and a policeman was, at great expense, sent after him (the said Frederic 
*' Clay meaniny), with a view to his capture. The i>olicemau never returned, nor was 
" anything further heard of Clay until the appearance in your paper of the article re- 
ferred to. 1 am, sir, your obedient servant. 

Jons McMiTLLKS, Inspector and General Manager." 

Judge Campbell proceeded to say that that letter came to the defend- 
ant, and he published it in good faith; but it would be seen that the trans- 
actions to which it referred took place in Australia, and it was there 
where the legal evidence was obtainable. A commission would be re- 
quired for that purpose. At any rate he needed time to look into the 
matter. Some three months ago the name of the witnesses had been sent 
fur t<> Melbourne, aud were expected by next steamer, so that the com- 
mission to examine the proper parties could then issue. 

Mb. Highton argued that that Court had no power to grant such a 
commission, whatever a court of civil jurisdiction might have power to 
do. He cited authorities, and said that if every word in the letter were 
proved to be true that would be altogether insufficient justification of the 
libel. The publication must be made with " good motives," and for "jus- 
tifiable ends." It was 80 or 90 years ago, and he believed it was still a 
great legal answer, that " the greater the truth the greater the libel." A 
man, might for instance, have beenfyuilty of some mistake in his youth, 
which, by a subsequent life of rectitude and honor, ought to be considered 
fully condoned. There are. anil ought to be, statutes of limitation, written 
and unwritten, which are recognized in all civilized societies. 

Judge Campbell. — Well, now, we concede that. But it is just because 
the state of facts in this case are the exact opposite of those yon have con- 
jured up that we are prepared to meet you on the real issue. It was be- 
cause this man Clay was doing certain things in a bank here that he was 
attacked, and it was only then that it came oufthat he had done similar 
things in a bank in Australia. I may be prepared to admit that the er- 
rors and indiscretions of a man's youth may be atoned for by the virtue 
and purity of his maturer years, and that a statute of limitations may be 
set up as a bar against their being subsequently referred to. But those 
are not the circumstances of this case. We claim and expect to show 
that the " errors " and " indiscretions," so called, of this man Frederic 
Clay, in Australia, over twenty years ago, resulted in swindling certain 
people of that country out of large amounts of money by fraudulent bank 
transactions. We claim and expect to show that be left Australia in dis- 
guise under an assumed name, and came to this city, and instead of aton- 
ing to society for his " error of youth" by a purer and more virtuous life 
in bis maturer years, he pursued precisely the same course of life and 
acted in the same way that he had done in Australia twenty years before. 
Let us try here and now what he has done in this city, and then we 
can judge whether it was proper and pertinent to show that the rascali- 



j ties of his maturer years were but a repetition of those of twenty years 
before. That contest we invite. There is no need of a commission for 
that. The witnesses are right here. The transactions took place in our 
midst. There is no necessity to so back twenty years to prove them, 
They took place the other day. When the evidence of all that is in, it 
will be for the jury to say whether the Newa Letter was not fully justified 
in calling attention to the past because of the present dereliction of this 
man Clay. 

Mb, Highton— While I object to such denunciatory attacks, I will not 
to-day reply to them. The question now is whether the commission 
asked for ought to issue or not. If counsel on the other side has not had 
time to investigate this matter thoroughly, let there be a postponement of 
all the cases, to enable him to make an application in due form, at which 
time the complaining witness will be prepared to meet such application. 
We have the power to dictate which indictment shall be tried first, and 
we mean to use it. 

Jidge Febbal— With regard to the question of the commission, I do 
not at present see my way clear to grant it. The counsel ought to make 
such a statement by affidavit of the facts as to satisfy the requirements of 
the law. 

Judge Campbell— We are waiting, your Honor, the arrival of the 
steamer to give us the names of the witnesses, to enable us to make such 
a statement. 

Jud«e Febbal was willing to allow a continuance to enable counsel to 
prepare himself, but expressed an opinion that the publisher of a libel 
ought always to have at hand the full legal proofs before he ventured 
upon publication. 

Finally the 10th of February was agreed upon by all parties as the date 
at which the matter should come up again. 

BLACKMAIL. 

Fitch, it appears, has become suddenly enamored of bringing libel 
suits against his competitors in the newspaper business. He has actions 
on hand against the Alta and the Chronicle. If a man who has two 
papers, both daily, and who may, therefore, morning and night, answer 
his opponents effectively, yet confessedly fails, what possible chance has 
an outsider against the attacks of the newspapers ? In San Francisco 
his best plan, if his case is a good one, is to appeal to the Neva Letter, the 
mentor and whip of them all. It knows them each and all, through and 
through. Scores and hundreds of our citizens have ere now found this 
out, to their great joy. Our clients have, time and time again, wondered 
at the skill with which we put their case, and silenced the enemy. They 
have thanked that wise providence which, in this gutter-snipe press-cursed 
city, provided a News Letter to silence, or at least disarm, an unfair press, 
that never takes back a falsehood or rights an injustice. If the Chronicle 
misrepresents a man, and he goes with a card to the Bulletin, he has to 
pay for it at the highest scale price. That is all right; it is altogether 
lovely; it is not blackmail, for is it not the act of an unctuous deacon ? 
In nine cases out of ten the man's card does not serve his intended pur- 
pose, because it is written by his own unskillful hands. He really does 
not get what he needs for his money. If he comes to the News Letter he 
has to do precisely what he is required to do by the Bulletin — namely, pay 
for it. Just that andnothingmore. But he gets from the News Letter what 
he cannot get from the Bulletin. He obtains value for his payment. His 
case is put for him, if needs be, by a traiued satirist, a sound logician, or 
clear expositor of facts, as the circumstances may require. The public 
ear is effectively reached, justice is done, the right prevails, and our client 
is happy. If that is blackmail, how much more so is a fee to a lawyer, 
who will argue the wrong side as well as the right, which the News Letter 
never does, unless its judgment is in error, which it seldom is. The 
truth is, there is a very great deal of hypocrisy about this whole thing. 
The line has got to be drawn somewhere. We draw it at swindling', mur- 
dering quacks and death-dealing nostrum peddlers. Their patronage we 
have persistently refused at any price. --The Bulletin has no such diffi- 
culty. It disfigures its pages with unsightly, immoral and dangerous 
quack advertisements, and it even enters into a partnership in the sale of 
a deadly drug, which it forthwith puffs as a heaven-sent cordial. "Vet it 
holds up its righteous hands against the News Letter, and says, "lam 
holier than thou." Bah ! The law that has just gone into operation de- 
clares virtually that he who makes money by quackery makes it by thiev- 
ery. That being a righteous law, does it not follow morally that he who 
receives the stolen goods is worse than the thief? Good deacon, take the 
beam out of thine own eye, so that thou mayest then see clearly to take 
out the mote which is in thy neighbor's ! 

PROSECUTION OP QUACK DOCTORS. 

The Birmingham Post says that proceedings are being taken against 
the principal quack doctors of Birmingham, numbering all together be- 
tween twenty and thirty. The cases will come on in the Birmingham 
County Court, the proceedings having been instituted under the Apothe- 
caries 1 Act for the recovery of the £20 penalties. Under this Act the 
penalty named is recoverable from any person, not being a surgeon or 
apothecary, prescribing and dispensing drugs. It was decided to proceed 
under this Act owing to the great difficulty there has always been in this 
town of obtaining a conviction under the Medical Registration Act. It 
is likely, however, that some of the quacks will also be proceeded against 
under the latter Act before the magistrates. Voluminous evidence hae 
already beeu obtained, and many of the leading surgeons of Birmingham 
will go into the witness box. Many of the patients will be called to give 
evidence on subpoena. 

It is a truism that a fault of youth, if repented of and atoned for by a 
pure after life, ought to be allowed to sink into oblivion. But if the wick- 
edness be continued from youth to mature manhood, growing from bad to 
worse, surely it is not amiss to point out that as the twig was inclined so 
the tree grew up. 

There were hopes entertained of having the prisoners in the County 
Jail clean the streets. They proved futile, for the " birds" preferred 
poker and pedro to wallowing in the slush up to their waists. 

There is at least one thing worse than libeling a rogue, and that is 
aiding him to cover up his tracks and get away quietly with his booty. 
Bulletin please copy. 



TO THE 




CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



IPX 

JEfJB ^ 


it 






\ V 


"*£/ / 




\--^5_ 











Ottloe-007 <<► ©_CS Merchant (Street. 



VOLUME £7 



SAN FKANCISCO. FEBETJARY 3, 1M7. 



NUMBER 2. 



BIZ. 



The mouth of January Furnished us a rainfall for on of about 

■ hi- halt the quAntit) ''.'- two preceding cor- 

am) ami 
Kciii.il. bringing forth the gi ■ Those of t ax farm- 

Bra behindhand in plowing and Bowing have now abundant time in which 

and they are impro\ ing pi >& ■■'' 
unities to the full" at extent of their ability, and we see] 
t.i prevent our ha\ ing in 1877 nd bounteous crops of cereal grains, 

fruits, etc., as in any former year. Ship-owners and others doin 

■ 1 1 this coast can now wit! California for protit- 

■ 
Wheat and Flour. — Thi 
during n da; - 

SO, have now receded to 82 05@2 10 per 
cental, with only m ither for milling or export. 

W. Elder, from Oi bulk of 

\ $ bbL The price of Superfine rules from 
Superfine, $5 75@6. The Golden Age, Golden Gate and 
Vallejo Stan- Mills Extra continue to furnish the city trade with the 
: i t all in cloth. 

Barley and Oats. --There is a manifest easing off in the price of Bar- 
■ i ; ing purposes. We quote Feed at $1 15(3 
'■ $1 ild, The George W. Elder, from 

i 3,000 bags Oats, the market for which maybe 
mes, the latter rate for choice milling. 

Oil Cake Meal has now been reduced to ¥35 I '< ton. 

Ground Barley.— $30 !< ton. Corn Meal. --$30 \j ton. 

Bran. --sis £ ton. Middlings.-- 930 I ton. Hay.--$11_18 f ton. 

Potatoes.-::. !.<2 %\ \ \ ctL Onions.— 51 50(2 1 6S 1 ' ctl. 

Hops. --'riii.' market i> ^lu-jj.-di at l.S'./i'i",:-. 

WooL— There is very little demand at 10@12c for Southern Burry 
Fl< ■■■ . b ad ' • ■■ ,! . for < Hear Northern. 

Hides. —There is a good demand for Dry at 17(3 18c; Salted, 8(3 9c. 

Tallow is in d 

Leather is the turn dearer. 

Dairy Products. --The maaket is well supplied with the 
of Grass Butter at 28@30c; Pickled do., 25c l !hi es ■, 8_ 15c., according 
to quality. Eggs are very plentiful at 25(2 28c. i- doz. 

Fruit. —Oranges from Log Angeles in quantities now reach us, both by 

:. ■! steamer, selling at {10 a 25 i ML, according to size. California 

Limes and Lemons are also plentiful and cheap. Raisins are also very 

abundant and cheap, and we notice shipments of some to Sydney, etc., by 

tin outgoing steamer. Apples are exceedingly plentiful and cheap, and 

if of choice quality find ready purchasers at g 1 priceB. Dried Apples, 

Peaches, etc, are in good stock, and those put up by the Alden process 
in small boxes continue to find purchasers at good prices. 

Borax. —We note shipments to New York via Panama, per Granad t, 
of 1 ,000 centals. The ship Orient, for New York, carried 570,900 lbs. 
These exports affords some relief to the market, which we quote at 6c. 
for Crude, 7£c, for Concentrated, 9J@9|c for Refined, latter in eases. 

Bags and Bagging. —It is said that large orders, sent early in the 
season to Calcutta for Grain Sacks, have been countermanded. The 
present spot price for 22x30 Wheat Bags is 84(5 8|c. cash. 

Canned Goods. --Sales of Oregon Salmon for forward delivery are said 
fcp have been made to a considerable extent at $1 55$ dozen, some 
400,000 cases of the catch of 1877 reported already contracted for, chiefly 
for the English market. 

Coffee. —The market seems to be quite firm at 20(5 22c. for Central 
American Greens ; Kono, 21c; Rio, 22c; Java, 23\c. There is no ( losta 
Rica in first hands. A carload of 250 bags Central American Greens 
went East this week by rail. 

Coal.— There is an improvement to be noticed in Australian cargoes. 
Wallsend is now quotable at SO ; Scotch and English Steam, $8; Belling- 
ham Bay, Coos Bay and Seattle, $8 ; California, Mount Diablo Steam. 
$o 75 ; Black Diamond (screened), $7 75. 

Dry Goods. —We note arise in all Cottons— Domestics of .If^'lc. 1' 
yard— owing chiefly to enhanced railroad freights across the Continent. 

Chemicals. — Sales are reported of 600 drums Caustic Soda, to arrive, 
at 6c; 300 bbls English Sal Soda, to arrive, at lfc. 



French Goods. — Tie Nemesis, from Bordeaux, brings a w< N assorted 
cai i to A, Vignier, consistii L525 cs Olive Oil, 3500 pkga Wine and 

■ 
Lead. --The Granada, for New York, carried 380,000 lbs Pig Lead, 

■ il Eor same, 1,664, 191 tbi same pric . 5 a 
Metal?. — The market for Pig Iron, Tin Plate, etc., is well supplied, 
and prices nominal. 

Molasses —There ia a g 1 stock of Hawaiian here, with only a mod- 

Li therefor al L5 j 25c, according to quality. 
Nails. -- Sales for the week, 5,000 kegs, quotable at $3 25@3 37 h for 

- | ;: II. i. I I d. 

Naval Stores. — Spirits Turpentine is plentiful at 50c; No. 1 Pale 
Rosin, $4 75(2 5. 

Oils. — We continue to receive daily supplies of Calif ornia Earth Oils 

from the Southern part of this State, and this interest, with good manage- 

promises, fit no distant day. to be a very valuable and important 

local interest. Already capitalists are turning their attention to a more 

full development of these long neglected, natural Oil wells. 

Orchiila, Ores, Etc.-- The steamer yewburn, from Arizona and Mex- 
ican ports, continues to make her regular monthly trips. On her last trip 
up she brought 49 bales orchiila, 4,000 sacks galena and copper ores, 38 
bars base bullion, and $250,000 in treasure, mostly Mexican dollars. 

Kerosene Oils. -- The market is well supplied with Devoe's Brilliant; 
price 44c @50c. for the various brands. Downer's 50c, Photolite 43c, 

Crystal 40c., Elaine 50c 

Quicksilver. — The Alaska, for Hongkong, carried some 2,000 flasks. 

Price, 45c. 

Rice. —The imports are large, stock heavy, and the market sluggish, 
at 5|e.@6c. for No. 1; China, 5.jc.(f>5.U\ for No. 2, and for Mixed 5c; 
■ Li . ii. 5c; Hawaiian, 6c. 

Salt — There is a fair stock here of Liverpool, which we quote at $20 
for Stoved -factory filled. 

Spices. — The market is well supplied with Black Pepper, Nutmegs, 
etc. The demand is, however, light, and prices more or less nominal. 

Sugar. —The ship Connaught Ranger, from Hongkong, brought 13,352 
mats: (he ">■ Igic, from same, 2,024 pkgs; the J'. C. Murray, from Hono- 
lulu. 3,900 pkgs, and the H. W. Alray, from same. 3.(121 pkgs. The de- 
mand is good for Hawaiian grocery grades at S.'. f« 10 Ac; Cube and Crushed, 

i;-;v : Fellow Golden, 9(5 LOjc. 

Teas.— The Belgic brought 3,400 pkgs Japans and 3,600 pkgs for East- 
ern account, to go by rail overland. 

Breadstuff Exports.-- The exports of "Wheat and Flour from this 

Sort for two seasons past, dating from the beginning of the harvest year, 
uly 1st to February 1st, stand thus: 

Flour, bbls. Wfieat, ctls. 

1876 340,857 8,770,072 

1875 281,031 4,647,900 

Breadstuffs to Great Britain and the European Continent from duly 
1st 1875-6, to February 1st, 129 vessels, with 4,647,0.17 ctls Wheat, 

valued at $10,354 91; 1876-7, 251 vessels, with 8,699,918 ctls Wheat, 
1 at $15,634 78, besides considerable Flour not enumerated. We 
have at date, on the berth, 21 vessels, of 30,480 tons registered tonnage. 

Freights and Charters.— Several important engagements have been 
entered into this week, including the ship Three Brothers, for Liver] ool, 
at £2. It is now hard to get ships under 62 2s. 6d. We have a fleet of 27 
vessels disengaged in port, of 29,000 registered tonnage. 

For the Australian Colonies.— The Pacific Mail steamer Zealandia, 
for Australia, via Honolulu, this evening, will carry the Government 
mails, pa.-„-»n<j;ers. ;in>\ for cargo, to New Zealand— Brooms, 204 dozen; 

Salmon 244 cs; Coffee, 1,64.0 lfcsj Hops, 6,122 lbs; Seeds, etc., 107 pkgs. 
For Australia— Brooms, 601 dozen; Doors, 549; Dried Fruit, 23 : e ; 1 fried 
Apple**, 217 hf bbls; Honev, 60 cs; Plaster, 150 bbls; Quicksilver, 232 
flasks; Salmon, 1,300 cs and 200 bbls, besides the usual assortment for 
H lulu. The business by this line appears to be steadily on the in- 
crease. 

There is at least one thing worse than libeling a rogue, and that is 
aiding him to cover up his tracks and get away quietly with his booty. 
Bulletin please copy. 

The only street crossing in town that is clean is in front of Super- 
visor Wise's residence. He didn't like hiring a boat to go home. 



Napoleon believed in destiny and good guns. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1871 



CONDENSED NEWS OF THE WEEK. 

LOCAL 

Saturday, January 27th. —Coroner Swan held an inquest in the case 
of the boy David Kinfander. Th« jury rendered a verdict of suicide.— - 
'i'li>.- California Thi a ■ r Boat Cluh is making arrangements for a r 
on Washington's Birthday. < ■ Among the th< 

Office was that of a pet deer from No. f2 : I ■"■ m street. » — The fifty- 
centqni has been dissolved, and a new an 

ment entered into fixing the rate at 47^ cents. 

Sunday, 28th. — The wife of E. L. Rexford, pastor of the First Uni- 
it Church of tl ad. Theladyi lighter of Rev. 

Isaac George, of Springfield, p.—- Sixty- i asea of Small-pox were 
verified by the i ef during the past week. Captain Harri- 

son's yacl tins' Bock, will be finished early in 

March, and will Lave the yawl-rig.—— The ladies of the Mite Souic : 
neeted with St. Luke's a lunch at Piatt's Hall on February 

7th, 8th .".'I 9fch, for the benefit of .St. Luke's Hospital. 

Monday, 29th. — A barge forty-seven feet long, for six or eight oars, 
on the Karlem and Schuylkill model, is being built by the Pioneer Row- 
ing ( 'lu!>.— —The Palace Hotel hop, announced to take place next Thurs- 
day, has been postponed for one week.-^— The ship 
just completed another fine passage of ninety-nine pays from tins port to 
New York. ^^A dinner of the Veteran Association of the New York 
Seventh Regiment was held at Frank's, 718 Montgomery street, this even- 
in l'. 

Tuesday, 30th.— A buoy has been placed over Blossom Rock.—— The 
ffrai ada sailed for Panama at noon to-day.^— Judge Ferralhas dismissed 
the char i 1 -t Charles S. Pries. — —The suit 

D. Manlove vs. W. H. Gratton was dismissed yesterday by Judgi . 
rison.— ^The will of Lafayette Maynard, who: valued at $553,- 

000, has 1 een admitted to prob: te, 

Wednesday, 31st. — The Ge< W. Elder has arrived from Portland 
with a full list of passengers.— The battalion drill of the Second In- 
fantry has been postponed till next Tuesday evening.— The Befyic, from 
Japan and China, b] f Tr< adwell & 

Co., in bankn Hoffman lias granted. a certificate of final dis- 

charge to -T. F. Place and W. 0. M. Berry, surviving partners of Baid firm. 

Thursday, February 1st.— A pictorial diploma has been prepar 
the Society of Territorial Pioneers. The design is emblems ic 
events in the history of < lalifornia, from the landing of Sir Francis Drake 
to Admission Pay. Supervisor Eaton, it is reported, will resuscitate 
the proposition to utilize the basement of the Hall of Records for prison 

:-s.— -Thomas J. Dixon, Clerk of the Police Court, repor 
during the month of January the fines collected by him amounted to 84,- 
125. 

Friday, 2d. —The Italian Mutual Benefit Society jives a ball at Union 
Hall to-morrjw night.— The grading of Jones street, between Sacra- 
mento ami * lalifornia, is aeaj iy completed. The " Ligue Rationale 
d ball at Horticultural Hall to-morrow night. 
— ^It is likely that the Babe] i i i Savings Bank will soon pull down the 
present bank buildb. luilding on Montgomery Btreet adjoining 

■ oorth, which is also owned by the Society.— The branch police 
station on the corner od Steuart streets has been completed. It 

has two cells, 9x7i feet each, and an office. 

TELEGBAPHIC. 

Saturday, January 27th. ~ What is known as the double-wheel mill 
at the Santa Cruz Powder .Mill, blew up: cause not known. No lives 
were lost. The Supreme Court has rendered a decision in the qu i war- 
ranto proceedings against the Hayes Electors, dismissing the case on the 
ground that the ally presented on the part i 

State instead of the Unil s.^— A number of officers of tl: 

war have determined to offer President "5 A exico, their services. 

Sunday, 28th.— Davis gives as his reason fur not resigning before the 
4th of March, that lie has several opinions assigned to him to write, and 
that he cannot complete them sooner than that.— Senator Jones has 
gpne to New York on a< count of the ill-health of his wife, who is detained 
there under care of physicians.— Senator elect Hill visited the Sen- 
ate chat.iU r and v as warmly greeted by Senators. I tlaine was . 
tii.' first.— The House < lominittee on Commerce are at work preparing 
the annual River and Harbor Appropriation bill, but have not yet reached 
consideration of the Pacific coast estimates. 

Monday, 29th.-0.Iou.lv and Sankey began revival meeting's at the New 

Tabernacle on Sunday afternoon. The building, which seals 6,000, was 

tilled in evei y poi tion, and it is estimated that 10,000 i eople were unable 

i admission.— The President signed the Electoral bill at 12:10 this 

morning. ^— G. W. Griffin has yrived at Washington, bringing full 

as Minister from the Governmeut of the Samoan Eslands to treat 

with ours in its behalf.— A Columbia dispatch says "On the 27th, at 

Timmousville, S. C, B. O. Holloway, Chamberlain's trial judge, was 

shot by unknown parties near his door. The assassination was committed 

by blacks, who immediately armed, and the whites organized a strung 

police force." 

Tuesday, 30th. --The Trustees of Dartmouth College to-day elected 

Rev. Samuel G. Bartlett, of Chicago, President of the College. Lit- 

d, clerk of the Returning Board, testified before Morrison's House 
to-day, that on thi 3d of December he altered the original 
returns from two of the polls in "Vernon parish soastotransp 
Democratic votes over tii the Republican candidates: that he did this by 

■i direction of Governor Wells. At Albany the £ 

■ 
there!- re ;: ;..te..I. -—!.'. miel O'Neill, editor of the Pittsburg Daily 

Vispatch, died . 
"Wednesday, 31st. -Four batteries of artillery, stationed atthear- 
■.ni Washington to nnroe.— Mar- 

shal Pitkin, of Louisiana, was examined last night at his rooms by the 
sub-Committee of the Louisiana Committee. Wells is ill this morning. 



The Louisiana re in close confin m nt.— A gang of 

broken up by the arrest of Wil- 
liale. of Plainfield, X. J. The Bwmdlii that of Hale, 

■■•. Potter & Co., having its office at 176 Broadway. Over fifty 

victims have been swindled out of sums rauuing from £5 to $2,500, 

Thursday, February 1st. -Says the Tribune i "It is due to our 
sense of national hospitality to give Sglesias a fair hearing, especially as 
repelled the svej-'^iMiis (l f the adventurers who wanted to make 
: itel at San Fj - of operations against the Mexi- 

co Republic." ™ — Mr. Plumb, i t 'ivp. ka, Kan 'ted to 

the United States Senate. then adjourned until February 

6th. Colonel Plumb is a printer by trade, and formerly published the 
s.— . II. of West Swansea, X. PI., was to-day 

nominated for Governor by the Prohibitionists. 

Friday, 2d. -Patrick Dolan, insane, living at New Dorp, Staten Island 
murdered his mother and fatally injured his sister. ■■ A young woman 
confined in the County Jail i I I ..■■ I 7 ■• le committed suicide last night by 
setting fire to her clothes. She was burned to a crisp.— Keeper Casler, 
d with a squad of convicts cleaning the walks in front of the 
prison this afternoon, rr, a convict, and horribly 

man ded about the head.— The New York Senate passed unanimously 
a resolution favoring the speedy resumption of specie payment. 

FOREIGN. 

Saturday, January 27th.— Bucharest telegrams say matters seem to 
have taken a serious turn. Russian pioneers have arrived on the Danube 
and are examining sites for bridges. Work on the Roumanian railway 
and the Summer residence of the Prince has been stopped, as war is be- 
lieved to be imminent.— -Great excitement continues in the Basque 
ncerning the conscription. Several war steamers have ar- 
rived at Balboa and been placed at the disposal of the military authori- 
ties.— Distressing accounts are received of scarcity in Pondicberry, and 
sidered imminent.— Max Outrey. appointed Minister to 
dted States, leaves for Washington next ■ 

Sunday, 28th.— The Pope has been indisposed since Sunday. He was 
lip to-day for an hour, and will endeavor to give an audience to-morrow. 
— lgnatieif, Russian Ambassador, left Constantinople to-day.— In 
. lity Persia is likely to observe a pacific policy 
(<■■■:. ard Turkey unless great pressure is exercised by Km .-ia.— Arumor 
a bed Paris that Prince Gortschakoff, the Russian Chancellor, has 
tendered his resignation. He favors a declaration of war against 
Turkey. 

Monday, 29th. — The Russian telegraphic agency announces that the 
■ : peace proposed by Turkey t<> Mo a I Servia is moderate 

and very conciliatory. ■ The Porte, in accordance with the friendly ad- 
vice of France and Austria, has requested Servia and Montenegro to send 
delegates there to arrange for peace. It is thought the proposal will be 
accepted. " The Servian Cabinet met Saturday and decided to accept 
Midhat Pasha's 3f pa will be taken to open regular 

negotiations with the Porte. Should there be no outside influence we may 
expect peace to be finally concluded. 

Tuesday, 30th. — Professor Lankester took out a new summons to-day 
against the Spiritualist Slade, and Simmons, his assistant, for conspiracy, 
also against Slade under the Vagrant Act.— We may hope that in 
the course of next month assurances will be given which will ratify the 
strong expectations now entertained that the prospect of a European war 
i& obviated. ■ The < rovernment has dismissed several Mayors for attend- 
ing masses in memory of Napoleon, and has decided to treat severely all 
! participating in Bonapartist demonstrations. 

Wednesday, 31st.— A dispatch from Constantinople says: "It is 
believed that peace will be concluded with Servia, and there is a rumor 
that Montenegro has received Turkey's overtures for peace favorably.— 
Countess Howe yesterday threw herself from the window of her mother's 
residence, in Be iare, London, and died from her injuries. The 

r's jury rendered a verdict that the act was committed while the 
is in an unsound state of mind, caused, by grief at the death of Earl 
Howe, her husband.— Fine sugars advanced Eufly one' shilling per cwt. 

in Glasgow to-day. Other qualities 6d., with a g 1 business doing.— ^ 

Eighty-six deaths from BmaUpox occurred last week in London. 

Thursday, February 1st.— Three hundred persons have been massa- 
cred in the city of Kali, Colombia.— Russia h; ah, but unsuc- 
l, attempts to raise a loan in Amsterdam and Germany, and will be 
obliged to have recourse to an increase of her floating debt and issue 
■■■-. binds. Russia is employing her time well. War preparations 
continue with energy and on a larger scale than ever before.-*— Hen? 
Baiith, the German explorer, engaged in surveying Poi ^sessions 
in Africa for the Government of Portugal, committed suicide in Loanda 
while delirious with fe 

Friday, 2d.— Negotiations have been commenced between Spain and 
the United States for a revision of the treaty of 1 7-'5, so that in the future 
citizens of either country when in the other can be judged only by civil 
courts, even in Cuba, unless taken in armed rebellion.— Servia is willing 
to raise her fortifications at Deligrad and Alexinatz if Turkey leaves the 
other fortresses in her hands. — The Roumanians are erecting batteries 
opposite the Turkish redoubts at Widdin. It is understood that the 
mobilization of the Russia guards has been resolved upon.— The publi- 
cation of the journal Les Droit* (!>■/ Homme has been suspended for six 
months by the Government and its editor sentenced to three months im- 
prisonment for insulting the President of the Republic and justifying the 
< lommune. 

It is a truism that a fault of youth, if repented of and atoned for by a 
pure after life, ought to be allowed to sinkinto oblivion. But if the wick- 
be continued from youth to mature manh I. growing from bad to 

worse, surely it is not . miss to point out that as the twig was inclined so 
- up. 

The crossing in front of the City Hall is to be cleaned every M 
in future, so that the Supervisors can attend their meetings on Monday 
evenings without taking life preservers with them. 



ugtitar. 



■ 



j «•[ Win. M 






ALTAR. 

mrd. 
tlor.ut. 

■ ■ ■ 
■ 

Diunhcr. 

u . '.\ orli !■■ i. 



TOMB. 
• rt'm Br 






■• T hi itii-ulv 

■ 

I 


■ ! . 
■ 

i 

1 ■ years, 

■ 

55 ye irs. 

. ■ 



■ 

1 1 



USEFUL KNOWLEDGE. 
■: and Memoranda in th "ol Jan., 1877.] 

Electric Clocks for Paris. -The French capital is going to treat it- 
self i" four electric timekeep ire, which v 

■ in bj September 30th next, The clocks are . 
n manufacturers have already entered for the c 
tation. Three prizes, £120, 680, rill be allowed respectively 

in addition for the tl icks. 

"What Constitutes an American Car-Load. —Nominally .in Amer- 
ican railroad car-loa i i- 20,00011 3. It is also 70 ialt, 70 of lime, 

•oi I of soft-wood, i 
Li l i of sheep, 6,000 fei I 
wheat, 100 of e< rn, 40U of 

pples, 430 of Irish potatoes, 300 of sweet 
:.' bran. 

The Value of Fur3. Since the year 1872 the value of furs has suff- 

ons iquence of the low prices they 

he great Eur traders of 

the world wei i t at their last meeting'. The 

i/ are martens and minx. 
In 1872 a marten's - fid. 'J is 1 Is. Gd, 

In 1872 ;t minx' .skin brought only a few pence less than a & vei igu. The 

Beavers have fallen 7 per cent, and 
skins 20 per cent. 

Califoruian Wool. --The colossal development of the Californian 
wool production is highly characteristic, for, whereas the total ■■ i 
duction of this country only amounted to l,000 f 0001bs. a few year 
it reached 12,000,0001bs. in 1872, and is estimated at 50,000,0001bs. for 
1876. The greater portion of this produce remains in America to 
cnand. 

Repeal of the German Iron Duty.— The remaining protective 
duties "ii mannfactui p irted into Gen from this day 

forward. Here, then, ia a gleam of light in the sombre horizon which 
confronts the British ironmaster. 

Costa Rica Prohibits Spirit Imports.— Hns the Government of 
this little Central American State all at once "turned teetotal" is the 
■ I !m : de iree which prohibits the importation of nil spirit- 
uous liquors. For importations from Europe this decree comes into oper- 
ation on the 4th inst. 

A Welcome Bonus. —Mr. Thomas Jessop, of Sheffield, wh ise re- 
nowned steel manufacturing concern is being taken over by a limited !ia- 
bility company, has made a gift of £30, to the shareholders by accept- 
in-' as payment for his property the sum of £400,000, the value being 
B430,00O. 

Large Steel Rail Contract— Krupp, the great German ironmaster, 
has recently tendered— ami successfully for supplying 6,000 tons of steel 
rails (to be delivered at Stargard, in Upper Silesia) at £9 6s. perton. 
This price is considered to be equivalent to £7 12s 6d. per ton at Essi n, 
the place of manufacture. 



. 



Adolplul-. II.-: 

1 . . i I I 

■ amy. 
■ 
Bush. 

Baluu is, iror Medical So- 

rand, 
■ ■■ Hotel. Oakl'd. 
■ 
liniwn .1. (colored). 62i Union, 
. iP.IU F.742 Ma 
■ 
Hurler. A R U O'Flirn 
v. i 

■ kton. 
Farro*. 
riinna. 

■ . 
I'.lanchai . n'r Stockton. 

I ■ ■ . i. u ; 

i ■ 
. ■ 

■ a. 
i Luzeraifl House, S Jose 

CaL 
,■.:; I iluinia. 
Burke, '■ '■ . ■"■ in cei . 

G w. 6 ii Sacramento. 
Rurr, C. i 8 Third. 
■ 

■:. ;■■■-;. 
Carr, A L, ISj Bnsh, 
Ciililll, — . U)i. Stockton. 
i la kk, Jons Kp, gone '" nealdsburg. 
Close, W N, (ex-PolIcemao) S22MlbB'n. 
, i. ,1. traveling around. 
3lmon, ("oidcio"), i05Kearny, 
Cinpp.<j H. (Farmer), Sonoma. 

i . . -. .v m^'y audSuttor. 
Dotierty, ffm K.G49 < Hay. 
Pacific. 

i ISSlOU. 

ith. 

[>c Bel; on, M. traveling arnund. 

J j i n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' . 1 >, S.w . .[;ii-l-,-.>ii ,v S;m^mie. 
1 1, .,|-r, I' I-'.. *..■•■> kii^.-l.i'r. !■.':■ Kills. 
I i :ilr- l-"n\. < mkhind. 

merclal. 

■. ■ 
l, i . . Scary. 
i; : vil. M i:.:-.M Second. 
Kliuoru. .V <', in :'. Washington. 
. : . 

■ . pre i i Peddler), Los Angeles, 
Euten, J, Ii f Stockton. 

■..].■ [or imory. 
; . Eitliis, A s, 8 2 Howard. 

i ... ■ ■■■:.'. 81 l Stockton. 
Fell, 
knderx, Munut'l. '.'!."> Kcurnv. 

nakcr j, 621 Post. 

J LCkHOD. 

, . , . I I.. I' " 

Fillmore, " I'd ' ' ' 528 Third. 

■ mg, Sam, 8 3 Pacific. 
French, K C, 181 Minna. 
:■ Iclituer, Gustave, gone lo N.York. 

■■.-. Charles, M Fell. 
Gibbon, J F, comer Commercial and 

Kearny. 
i ; .;... -i John P, '.-!.' Breads ay. 
\, 'ii avellna round. 
Rates, Dan Virgil, 609Sao'to. 
Grover. a J, on the wing. 
Gogs, W, i Third. 

Holland, Oustave, late Hospital Stew- 
,-tv.l, 413 Bush. 

II \T' ii. II. 813 Pacific. 

Hall. S HaSTINOs (alias Sam 1,001 Cal- 

. 
Fiodgdon, C L, H I :; Hi ward. 

-.1-, ii7.i. Tom, Peddler. 
it, i p. Post. 
Hanrlt, i i ', ttc .i 113 . 

i . .'.i & Stockton. 

cl ton. 
Holtlstcr, ti W, (i Montgomery, A Oak- 
land. 

• . Mna A M. 1 122 Folsom 



The long-er \- 

inithtDfl 
Doctor! 
tnj lor. In view of ti 

assured that we shall h« equally serving the prof 
generally when wc pnbllclyaah certain men: "Ha 1 I 

them an »<i\> 
on uifiion in obvious, and the duly of their 
plain. Wo append a list of practicing m m wo now pat that 

qaeatlon. Wo shall add to ii from tlmetotlme. 

1 " ZHpiomasf 
I 

mdHth. 

n,0 I'd 
, ('has, Con 

■ u ■ . I 

. i rav 

' 

I 

, ilsom. 

.- i. 

■ 

i ourth. 

Mil i \ .-II, .1 S, Incarcerated 
■ 

i .'liLckaon. 
■■<■' ; ■ ■ o.Jo ..>i.! T ! i una, 
Mi ton. W i 11 

■ .traveling uround. 
Mi spai a, i I'avel'g around. 

ra Thi iter liulld- 

■ Bush 
lC, 0O*l arrcll, 

Mnrpliy, n -,'.■, Honl 'y 

■ . ■ 
■ 

M mt rii Kfi . i . i-i and. 

M ir-lu.ll.M I-. -- .L.ekson, 

Morton, Albert, n O'Farrell. 

',[■,>. ,, i ,;, — , 7i Fourth. 

. I M, 38 Rnss. 
Merril.A P, - O'Farrel. 

Mulier I'Var.z. L-» Turke, 

,i ". ' allfornla. 
Newton, .1 !:. traveling aronnd. 
Noble, W B, iiuse House. 

! v. an l>,:.0i Front. 
i i Kearny street. 

Owens, Evan, i raveling aronnd. 
Parsons. Lorenzo, 542 Second, corner 

Brannan. 
PBo i Bi ■!-('. ( ', 113 Third. 
PiiM'h.'inl. .i r. i l'.;u-i( niii'D. 17 Third. 
I'iMr.i .. K i:, -:.j ^v,-h:„ L .ton. 
DC, 13 i « lelnentlna. 
Querlllecq, M, IllOMjeeion. 
Illchard, K.l. n:iv,-|ii,- around 

IIllS-,-1, I. P.. !.. 

Rap In.G, LSli Stockton. 

i;. M't-i. ■,.]• i ;, travel** round In Idaho. 
Koyer LC i liarnesH maker), Idaho. 

. ■ ■ ■ .ml Pliy- 
1 i ; mi i: i lot pital, i l'J i'uwell. 
Regal, C 01 .. 

ll'dl, .Inlui.^P I'iicllh:. 

■ !'--. II. I'l SlXth 
K-MV.-ll. Will 1\ ■> Sl„r„-. 

Si ET.C M.fl H Fourth. 

S< i|.h:m;i RO.G, ISlfi Powell 

, J A. '.' i ' Montgomery. 

■ ; er B (Tanner), 109 Dupout 
and L8I3 Powell. 

■ . II, ■ i v. , i,;i, r.Oakland. 
Third. 

Uipoi i 
Szarl .i-h, \ s T. i.p ■ Hup. .tit. 

■ 'I Pi. -inc. 

Smith, I? D, :.•.; Kearny. 
Sto '.I tf. '■■ K larny. 
Smith, v. D, Calbtpsa. 
SeUer, Edward, SOS Davis. 

ci, S, Stpokton. 
"Snmmers, \i A M. 77H Howard. 

Talt.J G, PiM i, 

'i ill n.O p.. . i ■ Mission. 

■ I'hom ia.Gi o. i-". trni ellna ruuiui. 

p.. ii-> .Marked. 
Tozer, Cliiirles H, Oakland. 
Tli i ■ ,-. \ A. : ')-. Suiter. 

i - w. ;,-.',; Krjirnv. 

rhoni Wm (alias " Old Dr. T.") U 

i tear; . 
Tm. i. Il.-iirv, 13'MPost. 
Vlgouruaux, A w, corner Third and 

Mission, 
Vjl-iii iue, C II tcolored cobblor.) 825JJ 

Fourth. 
VasiiL F 8.306 Fiarny. 
Von Kaismer, 0, bootblaok, 783 Folsom 

Vanrlenlierg. Jr, — .drifting round. 
Wright, .i w, ■ Kearny. 
Wilbok, )Vm, 653 Howard 



fTownrd,^ [colored harbor j, 1159 Mle- W11 ,H Roberts,29 Uinnn & Oak- 



■ Po ' ■ 

.Toroan, Louie .1,21 Geary. 
JoBselvn. BenJ F, i - Saeramento. 

Jo . Wit, cor. New Montgomery and 
Natoma. 

... .i H,22 ; Sutter. 

'.'■. ,i. n:: Third. 

ff. 153 Third. 

,i , ike, E, 013 Powell. 



. . John, 17h Mason. 

. If, <;:;«i MNvion. 
Willi. -i-l, v. I,. .: K..-II. 

Second. 

WlLKINS. T J, 815 i'-n-li. 

R HI ] ..' .■■!:.:-! Sixth. 

Wultc.SS ■ Larlcln. 
Whltmore, D H , 



vii'iPt.. nnmes appear In Bmall capitals claimed to have diplo- 
id:!- from Instil atlons whoBe ofllcera rep claims. 

•Has a diploma from the Quack Mctllcul School ol PhUid-;l*)Ya, thit 
sold them. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN" FRANCISfO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1877. 



The News Letter's Medical Directory of §an Francisco. 

Issued Moutlily "vritli Corrections'. 



At the cost of considerable time and labor we herewith present our readers with a complete list of the whole of the medical men in San Fran- 
cisco authorized by the California State Medical Society, and all those in the City and State authorized by the Homeopathic and Eclectic Boards, to 
practice under the new law, and who therefore are entitled to practice medicine and surgery within the State of California. For the first time such 
practitioners as Flattery, Luscomb & Co. are under the ban of the law, and may be arrested, fined or imprisoned if found pursuing the business of 
quackery. To have gained so much for the profession and the public is an achievement worthy of note. That we did not succeed in making the re- 
form mnre effective, was entirely owing to charlatans in the profession itself, who at heart have been the quacks' friends all through the struggle. So 
long as they could, they resisted all reform whatever, and when at last they found that we had excited a public feeling' that would not down, they so 
engineered matters that the Minimum rather than the mayiuinm uf reform was obtained. If something like half the names that have found their way 
into the qualified list represent men who ought to be without the pale, and amidst the quacks, then to Gibbons, Bates & Co. attaches the credit of 
having been the principal means of opening the door that let them in. But if the public will preserve our Directory, they will always have at hand 
a ready and safe guide by which to select a qualified medical man. Not that we recommend every man whose name appears in the list as having se- 
cured a license. Not by any means ! But our Directory shows ho ,v the licenses were obtained, whether upon the presentation of diplomas, upon per- 
sonal examination, or by means which the respective Boards do not state. The public will do well to select a Doctor who appears as the owner of a di- 
ploma from somc well-known Emvpcan or American Medical College. For ourselves, we should leave all others severely alone : 



Licenses to Practice Medicine in the State of California, Granted by the California State Medical Society. 



SAME, 



Aubert. James M 

Aver. Washington 

Aiigell, W. C 

Alers, Augustus 

Auerbach. J. J 

American, Samson . . . 

Aikin.X.J 

Anderson, Jerome A . 
Anthony. Albert G... 

Arensberg. H 

Aronstein, A 

Benn, John E 

Baldwin. H. S 

Blach, Carl 

Barton. T. J 

Burleigh. Wm. E 

Babeock.H.P 

Buck, E."W 

Buokiiall, G.J 

Bc-hr, II. Herman 



Bird, N. J 

Bruner, W. H 

Bradbury, W.T 

Brown, charlotte B.. 

Bryan, E. H 

Blake, James 



Baldwin, A. S 

Bolan, M.J 

Bluxome, Joseph . , 



Buckley, Cornelius F. . 



•Belinge, F. A. A.. 
Bennett. Thomas. . 



Bates, 0. M 

Brigbam, Charles B 

Bette, J. M 

Barkan, A. 

Bun-ell, Charles 

Burgess, O. 

'Blake, Charles E 

Breeze Charles K 



Brown, S. E 

Brady. Owen C 

Bertody, Charles — .. 

Bowie, A. J 

Bechl merer, J 

Buckuell, Mrs. M. E.. 

Bak. II 

Bazan, B. F 

Boyson.J.T 

Beuiley. r.i.h'.ui 

Boone, Hy. W 

Bun-ill. J. S 

lVm-1, Charles W .... 

Blake. James W 

Curr, E/.raS 

Chase. ]!. Hilton 

Cox, Thomas a 

CaslMiun, Frc-d'k C .. 

Dole, R. Beverley 

Ohesl»y, Charles P 

Callagban, John D.... 

Coryell. John R 

'Chismorc, George 

Cassily, John P 

Coon, Henry P 

Crook, John T 

Chamberlain. Phelps,. 

Carman, William 

Colin, David 

Chase, Kob't P 

"Cachot, M. A 

Cashing, Juo. J 

Cummings, Ralph W.. 

Clark, L. A 

Crosnaw. Mary E 

Chapman, C. B 

Dausuianu. H. L 

Doering.E.J 

Dayton, Eli 



i.UAIU'AI i:l> AT 



-iiu Kearny 

109 O'Farrell 

~il Montgomery., 

:il(i^ Stockton .. 



15 8 Mission 

51)4 Kearny 

Ill* 1 Folsom 

Bth and Willow, Oakland.... 



•Jii Kearny . 



6i2Clay, ... 

•■i 1 4 Kearny 

14 Eddy 

S.E. Sixth and Harrison 

Cor. Wash'n ft lutb.i fckiM.. 
Cor, WebsterA Nth. Oakl'd 

aa : Kearny 

5th and Bryant 



331 Geary... 
■J'Jl Kearny . 
426 Sutter., 



3UH Stockton . 
64(i Market. . . . 



703 Market.., 
209 Kearny . 
305 Kearny... 



'&£A Geary 

106 Hayes 

718 OTarrell . 

7 O'Farrell . . . 



ium.i Stockton 

1016 Bush 

Till Sacramento, cor. Kearny 

2d] Powell 

■Hi Montgomery 

Tv. enty-first and Howard. . . 



f Stockton 
S. Str. Haslaoz' ... 

P. M. S. S. Co 

233 Sixth 

IfiHKEddy 

Cor. Webstorft 12th, Oakl'd. 
462 Tenth, Oakland 

[032 .Mission 

16 Geary 



University of France, Montpelier 

Harvard Unr. crsity, Masi-aeliuseUs 

Bfllpvut il'i-]«ii.'l .M iiical i ollege, New York 

Erlungf a University, Bavaria, Germany 

\ University of Bonn, Germany 

' Hospital and Army Sur., U.S.A. ; Fr. Ger. war . 

i '.ill ■ "j'.: nt [ J ltyr-ici;in* and Surgeons, X. Y 

Collegi of I'Lydcians and Surgery , Cincinnati .. . 

University of ( 'alifornia 

University Vermont 



Albany Medical College, New York 

University Maryland 

University of Buffalo, New York 

Physicians and Surgeons, New York 

College Physicians and Surgeons, Xew York 

i Frederick William University, Merlin 

H louncilor Slate Examination, Ooethen, Ger'.v. .. 

Queen's College, Canada 

Jefferson .Mcdk-.il College, Pennsylvania 

Rush Medical Ci.lle; e. i 'iik-ago 

Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania 

University of Missouri 

, 1 i'ivcr-iij uf London, England 

IF. It O. S., England 

'■'■ " i !'i i- ■ c, , . i jhiii 

Medical < 'ollege of Cenrgia 

Universit) of ( ity of New York 

^ Queen's University, Ireland 

Licentiate R. C. P., Edinburgh 

' Licentiate R. C. Surgeons. Edinburgh 

Medical Department University of Pacific 

I King- i lollege, Aberdeen 

'M. R. C. S.. England 

i- r ■misyhauia 

Harvard University, Massachusetts 

i M-dical i'i, 11. -ge, Pennsylvania 

' ' ' ■ ersifcj of Vienna 

College Physicians and Surgeons, New York 

< lollege Physit ians and Surgeons. New York 

Medical Department University College. San Fran. 

lM. i:. c. s,, Loiionii 

<L. R. C. P.. Edinburgh 

University of .Michigan 

Apothecaries' Hall. London, England 

Harvard University, Massachusetts 

University of Maryland 

University of Vienna, Aus., IshI : Univer. of Mex.. 

Xew England Female Med. Col. of Boston 

University of Vienna 

Medical faculty of Paris, France 

University of ( lopenhagen. Denmark 

University of City of .New York. 



852 Folsom .. 

431 Pine 

SHI Mission.. 



406 California. . 



B2B Howard 

31 Third 

319 Geary 



Folsom and Third.. 



University of l.-'iy 1 of Xew York 

College Physicians and Surgeon?. Xew York 

University of Munich. Bavaria, Germany 

University id' I 'alifornia 

I .is tic ton Medical College. Vermont. 

Detroit Homeopathic Med. College. Michigan 

i'uivcr-ity M f t ':ili forma 

University of Michigan 

Med. Col., 18 M; M. B. C. S., England.... 

University of Vermont 

University of Louisiana 

Ohio Medical < College 

Medical Depart men t University College, San Fran. 

St. Louts Medical College 

University nf Pennsylvania 

College Physicians and Surgeons, Xew York 

St. Louis Medici College 

College Ph icians and Sujgeons, Xew York.. 

Berlin, Gcr'y 



I . 



. Y... 



■•■:. ! Muiitgoiuery 

313 Hush 

Aes't Murine Hospital.. 



Hiiiiin.'|iatlm- Mcdiciil CI lege of Pennsylvania.. 

Xew York .Medical Cnllege 

Ivllcv in- Hospital Medical College, Xew York., 

Eclectic Medical Institute. Cincinnati 

Passed examination 

L'nivcrsil;, Wur/burg 

chicag.. Medical College 

Cincinnati Medical Coitoge 



MM. T. WEXZELL, 

IMPORTER AND DEALER IN 
Drugs, Chemicals, Toilet Articles, Perfumery, Etc 
English, French, Spanish and German Preecrip- 

ptions Carefully Compounded. 
July 10.] N. E. Cor. Market and Stockton sts. 



B. A. and M. D.. 



See note elsewhere.. 



Not practicing,. 



Not practicing.. 



Feb. :*. 1877. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAH FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



■ 



- 

i :.l ■ 



I 

i 



■ 
■ 









■ 



■ 



I 



■\ ill V 

I 

■ 

/; . 



II 

1 



Uu 



U 



■ 
II i illmm M 

I'. V. 

H .! 

i ■ 

■■ r . . 
Iliam V 

■ | 

11..1.V, c.s 

i'. 11... 

ti 

|' i i nw.... 

■ n. u..... . 

I I 

I ! ■ ■ I ■ ■ ■ . i 

. ■(. I 

: W 

. ! , F. V 



'■■■ l 1 '... . 

■ i - 



. . i.ii. i lharles V.. 

Jones, Win 

.i . . . .1 r 

Johnson, Win. H ... . 

B 

■ ! ... 

■i'iikI 

Kendal 

' 9 W 

a. < G 

ey, ( '. C 

i H 

.. I 

I i kuhl, II 



Lane, E. L. C 

Loi yea, A. ,\l — 

i Win 

L ■ H. .. -- 

Win. D 

Murrai . John I- 

Murphy, R. W 

Martiuaehi . X. .1 

Mc( 'ormick, i iharles... 
McQuesten, Charles A . 
."•U'l'liiT-Mii, Mayuord . . 
Mac kin to-.h, Robert ... 



MoNutt, W. F.. 



Maxwell, R. T 

McNulty.J. M 

McMillan, Robert.. 
Mo A II inter, W. F... 

■ 1 1 . ..I . L 

Meares, John J.. . . 
Moccai f, ' I uiseppi . 

■ . . 



linn . Fran : - M 

■ii. A. D 

M ■ ■■ '■. Lewis 

Haas. Philip 

McLoy, George 11 — 

Mel lur -,:<■■! 

Moofclar, James P. . . 

M n re, Chas. W 

McElroy, Jas. G 

'Murphy. Jas 

Mouser, B. T 

Mayon,T. H 

Miliken.A 

Merry, Alphonse — 
Nichols, Henry L ... 
Ne tell, D. D.T . ... 
Neweomh, \\ esley. .. 

Newell, W. A 

Nuttall, R. K 



O'Neill, J. C 

O' Poole, Michael C . 

O'Xeil, A. A 

Pierce, Charles L 

Pjnkorton.E. J 



: 



ilngton . 



illfi Stockton 

■ 





O'l .. .; 

i (i, Onkl'il 

I 



20. Monl 
:<. Monti 

. i i 



. 

I : ■ .... 



Kfl Washii 

IU Third 





ion 



prell 

B24 Mission 

i ■ i .ii 

i lor. Hyde an.! Sutter 

i loi . Mission and Second. ■ 
Oor, Sui tor and Kearn: 



■ i 

I 

. ■ . 

I 

703 Posl 

302 Davis 

- ill Mission .. 

ISM 1 .:!-■ Ill ... 



■ll."' Butter 

71:< Market .... 



id 

N.E. Mission and 2d 

imery. 

Simla (.'lava ... . 

1 i Kearny 

New Montg'j and . ■ boms 

I ■■ l ■ ■'■ rrero and itith 

ion 

N.E. "iltn and Howard 



■ ■ - and Van Ness Av 

City and County Hospital . . . 

■--.I oo.Yu.37a." 

B30 Howard 

nd County 1 toBpital. . . 
903 Kearny 



In Europe 

Hammam Baths. 

■ I ;■!■ : 

pirn Broadway, Oakland.. 

ckton"""^"^'! 
33] Kearny 



l>. « . 



1 

i 

■ | ■ ■ .i 



... , i 



. . 
ilod i ■ i . i ..... . 



1 1 Germany 





■ ■■ ■ ■ i . • 

if Ht.l "iiiirh'h. Ill 

leuna 

. 

Ci I re 

i I Colli no 

''■'■.■ 

M K.i-. > . i .. . ....I 

■ land 

■ i. - . ■ R . ' Edinburgh ..... 

.i ma 

Medical Dei ■ i I niver its of Pacific. 

M B I S., I.,,:-!,,!,!. 

1 n ■ 

. I 'ennBylvoniA 

■ I ' 10 .1- 

Department Univoi il ■ i olle ;e, San Fran. 

. i . i . . i . i i . . i ■ c i." ...... 

Harvard l -.ichuseiis '. 

!■ ■■ ' ill Bf 

■-■■■ ■ H llll ....■ 

lied. I illugi 

■ i i 

1 ;...-l: i.i ;).- 1 Sur; - - - - - j i s, Xcv» Ynl'k 

■ Medical i iollege, ( leveland, Ohio 

■ i ■ ichusettt 

t/aoulte di Paris,! ranee 

univei Ity oil ennsylvania 

Univerbii . ■ ■ ■ ,<:> 

I iivi ityCiiy of how York 

■ iwa . 

1 

Harvard I nivei it] Massachusetts 

M< tfbal Dcpartinont University College, S. F 

it; ..i City of Mew York 

■ 1 iLn .'i i ■ I i. 1 .-. i ■ 1. 1 s unii Carolina 

i ■ I 'aclie, S;ui I laticiseo 

[ Diversity of Louisville, Kentucky 

Atlanta Medical I ,>n.-;_-t.*. t.Jeurfiia 

University of New York 

larylond 

I ■■! Pennsylvania 

Jefferson Med. OoL, Penn, WU2; L. I, Med, Col 

i aivoi ity of Louisiana 

i ■ ity of Louvain, Belgium 

University of Pacific 

University of Pacific 

Jefferson Medical College 

ityof Loo . liana 

Cm ...i -n> ..f [Vim-;, hania 

Medical < iollege of Pacifio, San Francisco 

University Vienna, .*i>i ; University Mexico, 1875. .. 



is H 

I I 
l-.J 

|KM 

i It! 

h,'.' 
■ 
IB71 
; 
11443 

Ifl.'l 
■ 



Med. Dir. Dep. Oal., U. S. A 
230 Kearny 



23S Kearny 

1.1 Montgomery . 



135 Kearny 

&i Kearny 

722 Washington... 
Occidental Hotel., 

I4Z Sixth 

124 Geary 



:;d and Mission.. 



Mist urn and -1st 

Hi* Market 

■i.i Post 

i;.vj Mju-kc-i 

Xi."w Marine Mu^pital ,. 
S. E. Clay and Kearny, . 



Redwood City 

Montg'y Av.. near Stockton. 

Z'ii Kearny 

714 Tenth, Oakland 

B'dway, bet. Uthtfi I2th,0kd 

630 Boword 

317 Geary 



■-''Jl-I Sixtoonth , 
'J'li Market 



i ■ .■>■ Eiiept ig 

Passed examination 

,t. !,.'i-..]i Medit.-a) College, Pennsylvania. 

University of Pennsylvania (late u. S. Navy) 

Queen's i iollege, Duhlih 

I ii... r-,';. ..I 1'uuiric. S. F 

Universit of Pesth, Hungary 

i : i ii ': I '...'' i. Mi:,'.' i.-. (.'Iijtujio 

Bellevm H . Med. I ol., 1874; Med. Col. of Pac. 

Medii .■! i ..ii" •■ "I Pacific 

Bowdoin Med. I lolli ge 

Ri-1U-mi'> H ■-.«. .Mh.'I. Colk-iri', Ni'W York.. 

Albany Jluiln'M ' "fl ['■j-v, New York 

\ University "i Gottingen 

'!'.■.-■■■ 1 St ,t<' Kx.-siiiiniiii.ni, Bremen 

JetT«i um M dica! College. Pennsylvania 

Stato Medical i oil ol South airolinn 

Jefferson Medical i nlloge, Pennsj Ivanin ........ , 

Homeopathic Medk-ul I ■oih.^v. t.'lnveland, O 

University ol New York 

University of G riloj ira, Mexico 

i'. Ih-M •: ■-* ■ ' I i ..li i C .11.',-, X. V 

i acultj i -I Medicine, Paris 

i. tiiversitj of Maryland 

Dartmoul it College. Nevi Hampshire 

University ol Maryland 

, M. K. i ' S., i;,lHilmr-li 



I B, i '. S., Edinburgh 

JR. O. P.. Edinburgh... 

' University of Vermont 

Universit v ui t'"iin*' Ivania 

Geneva Mediual College. New York 

i nive ait] "i Pennsylvania 

Univeraifa of Pennsylvania 

D itroil Medical I iollege 

,1 -Tii.Tsoii Medical ( 'olk^e, Pennsylvania 

Cnivrrsity nt' Pisa. Italy 

iM. B. C. S., England 

' A p'ii In ■ t- j ■ ti..-, I); ii. London 

Wtimi-ii't- .Miilti-.ii ( '..1 l.-fii.- df Pennsylvania 

1 ' ■ My r,f i altforniu 

Detroit iMedieal l 'ulleuc, Mii.-higan 

Univer -ii.'.' m i lalifornin 

Huyal ( 'olli-.'e id' Pliysicijuis, I ,ii in Lurch 

[edical I ollege, Pennsylvania 

.Mi.i1h.mI > ''iliece of Ohio 

■ '!.■■ i-.-i I ( ',,[|, ,. .,v \\"i,uii,,|(ick, Vt.Tim.int 

Rii-h Medie:il College. I'hiea'.'o 

Medical College of Pacific 

Bellevue Huspital Medical College, New York.. 
Pushed exam ination 



Powell, near Market., 
Oakland , 



University Odloge Pacilic 

P.owilnin Medicai College, Maine 

Am.; hi I })<:■: i rt inent Cuiven-ity of New York.. 

Castle ton Medical College, Vermont 

Universit v of Burlalu, New York 

(R. 0. Sy Ireland 

' Kind's ColL.'t'", Aherdeen 

University i.f t 'alifornin 

University of New York 



JAMES O. STEELE & CO., 
ChexnUta and Apothouartos, 

I ! I'. 

Bt ; ■ h ■ I ■■ i 

I i ,.,, Qi .. . , ! 

[Ducumber 4. J 



II. P. WAKFJLEE, 

Wholesale and Retail Druggrist. 

Importer of Foreign and Domestic Drugs and 

Chemicals, and Manager of the Golden City 

Chemical WorkB, 

MO Montgomery st, under Occidental Hotel. S. K 

July 10. 



C. ItOETHE, 

Apothecary, 

S. E. Corner Third and Bryant Street*, 9. F. 

Prescriptions carefully put up in English, French, 

Spanish or German. July 10. 



( 'ollei/n Physicians and Surgeons, New York.. 
Harvard University 



J. W. KITLE, 

Drugs, Chemical \, Perfumes, Cosmetics and liair 

Brushes at G 'eatly Reduced Prices. 

PTJBE \> Oi Efi AND LltJDOIlS. 

July 10. No. 300 ihird St., cor. Folsom, S. F. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISSO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1877 



GRADUATED AT 



Pawlicki, L.... 
Pau-h, Win.J . 
•Pernn.K 



Parson, Edward . 



Powers, George H 

Parry, Isaac 

Pigne, J.Baptiste 

Peabody, W F 

Pinching, R. L. A. C 

Perrault. J., Jr 

Pardee, E. H 

Pritchard, Maurice 

Prosek, Joseph 

Hine hart, M 

Rut tan/ i, A 

Rodgers, Lee O 

Richter, Max 

Rockman, Morris 

Ryer, W. M 

Rogers. H, D 

*Rowell, Charles 

•Rowell. Chester 

Rosenstira, Julius 

Regensburger, A. E 

"Robertson, Jno. B 

•Robertson. E. B 

Rice, Juo. R 

Ruebar, J. G. Rooseboom. . 

Regensburger, Jacob 

Seaton.H. L 

Shaffer. James C 

Stivers, C. L 

Stallard, J.K 



Stowell, C. C 

Stewart, Alexander John.. 

Stout, A. B 

Smith, W.F 

Sawyer, A. F 

Shorb, J. Campbell 

Soule. A.G 



Stillman, J. D. B . 
Scott, John 



Scott, John G 

Schlatter. Charles H.. 

Simpson, James 

Swan. Benjamin R 

Steele. Charles H 

Sobey, A. L 



Sylvester, J 

Sawtelle, Chester M. . 

Schmidt, Ed 

Soule, Milan 

Sharkey, J. M 

Sturgcs, F. D 

Sullivan. Jos. F 

Sprague. Rains Win.. 

Tolaml. H. II 

Taylor, W. 

Tewkabury, J. M 

Todd. David B 

Tibbetts. Stephen M. 

Tallon, John Ed 

Thomas. Frank H.... 

Taylor. W. S 

Titus. Isaac S 

Thom. Wm.A 

Valencia, D 

Van Vlack, G. J 



Sutter and Montg'y . 



Imperial University St. Vladimer, Kijeff, Russia.. 

Rush Medical College. Chicago. 

University "i Pacific 

^ University of London. 



i Mnutgomery.. 

4i:i Kearny 

7:t Clay 



S.E.Folsom and Third. 



IIS Kearny . 
30 Kearny .. 



.earny 

— - Kearny 

- — Kearny 

Corner Geary and Kearny. . 



— Sixth 

Calaveras Co 

789 Howard 

Broadway, near Stockton . 
1. -J Powell 



759 Market . 
514 Kearnv .. 
110 Kearny.. 



742 Howard. . 
206 Kearny ... 
110 Kearny ... 

1)13 Bush 

302 Stockton . 
alb Sutter... 



810 Stockton ... 

P. M. S. S. Co.. 
■Til Valencia ... 



7~><i Folsoni 

652 Market 

P. M. S. S. Co. . 
63-1 'Washington . 
P. M.S. S.Co... 
Ill] Stockton .... 
26 Muntgomery.. 
iji Hi Merchant 



303 Powell . 



931 Howard 

U. S. A., Black Point.. 
73fi Geary 



Not practicing... 

— Kearny 

Not practicing 

Not practicing... 

— O'Farrell 



Van Zand t. John "W 

Warner, Henry 

Webb, J. Philpot 

Wiss, i '. Win. C vista ve 

Wo/eneraft, O. M 

* Wagner. John 

WvUie. W.T 

Willev, John M 

Watson, Wm.S : 

"Willsnn, J. D 

Wavman, W.G I 16 Geary... 

•Whitney, J. D.,Jr 

Wooster, David 701 Mission 



lb Geary 

1109 Stockton 

Market, near Powell. . 



104 Mason. 



Wilson, Win 

Wheeler, Peter 

Wilhelm, A 

Wadsworth, 0. H 

Young. H- S 

Zeile, Frederick 



653 Howard .... 
Oakland Point . 



Harvard University. Massachusetts 

University oi Pennsylvania 

Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh 

University of Maryland 

M. R. C. S., England 

University Queen's ( '.dle^e, I 'anadu 

linsh Medical College, Chicago 

Detroit Medical (.'nil- *_-■.-. Michigan 

University of California , 

University of Louisville. Kentucky 

University of Pavia. Itaiy * 

Bellevue Hospital Medical ( oliege of New York .. 

University of Leipsig 

Medical College of Pacific. San Francisco 

University ..f New York 

Cleveland Medical College, Ohio 

University of Pacific 

University of Pacific 

University of Wurzburg 

I 'idlege Pii 'sk-ians ami Surgeons, New York . 

Mi d.cal Department University of Pacific 

Univeisi y of Pacific 

II. ( '. IS.. London. ls:jii : M. D. Universitv Glasgow 
University Utrecht, Netherlands, 



Kentucky Medical School, Louisville 

College Physicians and Surgeons, New York. . 



iM. R. C. P., London. England 

'M.R. C. S., England. University of London 

Electic Medical College, Cincinnati, 

Fac. of Physicians A Surgeons, Glasgow, Scotland 

College Physicians ami Surgeons, New York 

Miami Medical i ''ill. *;,-.>. Cincinnati. Ohio 

Harvard University, Massachusetts 

University oi Pennsylvania 

\ Berkshire Medical College, Massachusetts 

(Bellevne Hospital Medical Colleee, New York... 
College Physicians and Surgeons, New York 

tF. K. C. S. Ireland 

' Physician St. Andrews. Scotland 

Jefferson Medical College, Pennsylvania 

University of Pennsylvania 

University City of New York 

1'i.lle-e Physicians and Sur-voi.s. New York 

University City of Ncv York 

' te R. C. P., London 



>M.R.C. S.. England.... 

I niversity of California 

Willamette University, Oregon 

University of Wurzbtirg, Havana 

University of Vermont 

Harvard University 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.... 

Harvard University 

University of Harvard 

Transylvania University .if Lexington, Kentucky, 

Bellevup H.-p.i.al M .heal College. New York 

Bowdoin M- . "■ i i '■ 11- ye, Maine 

University of Michigan 

Berkshire Medical College 

University of Pennsylvania 

New York Hotnojnpathic Medical (.'nil eye 

Jetfersou Medical ' 'oliege. Philadelphia 

Cleveland Medical ( 'ullcye 

Medical College Virginia, Richmond 

University of Guadalajara, Mexico 

IL. R C. P. and S.. Kingston. Ontario 

. M. D. Univ'ty of Queen's Col.. Kingston, Canada 

' Member I 'id. Phy'ns ,t Surgeons. Canada 

College Physicians and Surgeons, New York 

Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York 

R. C. P.. Edinburgh 

University of Wurzburg, Bavaria 

University of Louisville. Kentucky 

Medical College of Pacific 

University of Pennsylvania 

L. R. C. S-. Dublii 

Bellevne Hospital Medical College. New York 

University of Pacific 

Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York 

University of Pacific 

\ Western Reserve Medical College, Ohio 

/University of Turin ■ 



Sixth and Harrison.. 

536 Sacramento 

Kl Pacific 



iciatis and Surgeons. New York 

im the Sanitary Commission, Baden 

lersity. t levelaud. Ohio 

Tubingen, Wurtemburg, Germany.. 



Medical Department University College, S. P. . 

Medical Department University College, S. F. . 
Medical Department University College, S. F. . 



Licenses to Practice Medicine in tho State of California, Granted by the Board of Homeopathic Practitioners. 



N OIK. 



Angel!, J. W 

Arnold, Kjwdon ... .. 

Adams, Zftohary P 

Barnes, George W 

Bennett. Win 

Burrett. Frances 

Baldwin. Sherman C 

Beach. George H 

Burr, Agnes C 

Breyfogle, Edwin S ... 
Breyfogle. Charles W . 

Berry. John L 

Clark. Joseph K ..... 
Co well, Joshua M 

Canney, F. E. J 

Chailes. K. \\ 

i larpenter, Henry F ... 

Cross, Lester E 

Crooks, Edwin K 

(.'nwlcs. >.i'iri.l 

Dixon. George M 

Dean. Tun. .thy 

Dobson, Abel 

Elliott. L WVstiall.... 

Eckel. John L 

Ely. Wallace A 

Floto. Jol.n H 

Fuller. James P. 

Eraser, Edwin J 

GriBwold, WalcottN.. 
Gt-Iher. ( ha- 1' . 
Hiller, David Albert .. 

Miller. Fred.. Sr 

Hempstead W. 0. F . 

Hollett, Mattie 

Huribut, E. T. N 

Miller. F.. Jr 

Hummer. J. din N .... 



ADD 11 ESS. 



GEAJJUATED AT 



Medical Society oft he County of Orleans, N. Y 

Passed examination 

Muui-Hi- < i muty Medical Society. Nov, York 

Western Homeopathic Medical Col., Cleveland. 0. 

Pasaed examination - 

Westeru Homeopathic Med. Col., Cleveland, Chio 
Homeopathic Med. Col. of Missouri. St. Lcuis. Mo. 

New York Homeopathic Med. Col., New York 

Parsed exam ination 

Hahnemann Medical ( 'olley.c, Fhit'a, Pa. .. 

Hahnemann Medical College, Phira, Penn 



Los Angeles 

Woodland 

Cyultervillo 

San Diego 

San Francisco — 

Santa Cruz 

Oakland 

Oranire 

Safl Francisco 

San Jose 

Snn Jose 

Modesto - Passed examinat ... 

San Rafael Hoinenpailiie Meiiieal ( 'nlleye, Phil'a. Penn 

Santa Rosa.. . Hahnemann Medical clli ^e. rdd'a. Penn 

Santa Cruz - Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago. Illinois 

Nevada City St. Louis Medical College. St. Louis, Mo . . 

Valle'-i. Passed examination 

"nil"; 1 ( 'ul. of Missouri, St. Louis . 

!!■■- . i iiicinnati, 

■at! ic Med. Col.. Cleveland. O.... 
pathic Med. Col., New York 



Stockton Home oi 

Santa Barbara Palte Me 

San Francisco Wesieri 

Srctamcnto New Yo 

Fibs 

i .ra-s Valley .. 

Stockton 

Sao Francisco. 

San Jose 

San Francisco 

Sonoma 

San Fr.mctSCO. 

San Francisco. — ..... . CastletonMe 

Sui-uu i .iy . [few York Homeopath]' 



Passed examination 

Hahnemann Medical I 'oil eye. Chicago, III 

St. Louis Col. of Homeopathic Phys. and Surgeons 
N Y. University of .nedicine and Surgeons, N. Y. 

Pennsylvania Medical College, Phil'a 

Lansing Homeopath c Med. CoL, Lansing, Mich ,. 
Hahnemann Medical College. ( Chicago 

astJeton, Vermont 

Medical College 



San Fr.inci<co I'assed examina timi . . . . 

San Francisco I Fred'k Wilhelm Inst.. Staid s Exam., Berlin, Ger. 

Mar> r- vi lie Homeopathic Medical ' 'oliege of Mo.. St. L"uis . 

Los Angeles Homeoi athic Hospital College, (Cleveland, O 

San Francisco I'niverMty of Butfalo. BufTalo, N. Y 

San Francisco Hahnemann Med. i lollege. Phil 

San Jose Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago 



REMABKS. 



DR. J>. VALENCIA, 

Physician and Surgeon, Green St.. 

Bet. Montg'y Ave. and Dupont. 
Graduate of University of Guadalajara. Aug. 14 



IYI.. 3, L877. 






POSTSCRIPT TO TIIE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






ut.n*, Cauda 









I 
II 



, K. Y... 

\"tl ' " 

111 

i k. 



M . 



.M i '■■! ■ ... 
1 i! 



! 

qf Mo., : 
1 into, Ponn. 





I. ..... 

i Santa Rosa <>i Penn., Phil's,. 

i 



... New . ■■.■■! 

1 - ■ ■ Horn in, 1'bil'a 

nw, at V A ;■,, - 

M ii . rfllc I 

ii. .;. College ol Penn.. Phil'a... 
' , ' 1 hK, w • tin Llion 



WTLLIAH. F. HATHEW, 

. ■ i > i | i . i | i •, 

SELECTED DRUGS, CHEMICALS, 
TOILET ARTICLES, ETC. 

1 .i i i, ,i i ;i. Boioala, Toilet An |i 

PHYSICIANS" PRE8I ttlPTTONS 

Prepared, and at Bfodorau Ratea, 

July 10.1 141 F"i i.i ii I \ 



Licenses to Practice Medicine in the State of California, Granted by the Eclectic Medical Society. 



NAME. ADDB 


. d A1 


Vlt 


BJOIABHB. 


Adair. C. II 








■. 

J II 






longo, _ 

1 
1 allege 1 .'ii.'.- [0 

"1- 




JOHN C. MOODY A- CO., 

Apothecaries, 

No. >H Kearny street, be ween Sutter and Bush. 


a 










■ i 


Prescriptions carefully dispensed with the purest 

of Drugs and Chemicals. 

[September 11. j 












Barrow*. UiHirfftt L 



M i 


... 


Eclectic 1 ■■■ ' .'■■".-. i pperMie. 

1 Institute, Peti nbura, \ u 

■.:. dienl Institute. « jiuncinnati 

. York 

Iledical Institute, Cincinnati... 

i allege, Philadelphia 









M irkel street, near '>tii 







































■ 














' ' ■ ' ■ ■ ' 


S2U Sutter 









■■;■ yfiV:- il ' ■..ll.\.-". fliil.iii.'b.hia 

Homeopai hie Mi dical ■ kdlege, Philadelphia 






■ 








Oakland 




■ 1 

IB 

i i- 


!■: li-.J !.■ Mr-.lir-iil In: 1 itntf, ( 'incinnaii . , 

Eolecl io Medical Coll e. New Vork 

College, Philadel] nio 

|-]i.'!>'vtic Mi-ilir.vi! f i --. M:-mesoia.... 

Homeopathic M.i .w York 

: i bio Medical College of Pennsylvania 
























H. 




















V. H 

' ■ R. J ... 










tiii.iw.. ii M 

D l< ■ ■■ u ....... 










Kentucky Eclectic Scl ool ol Medicine, Louisville 

Uetropolit in Hcdioal Collecp, N. Y>. 

■■I idical * College, Pi torsburg, Va 


COFFIN * MA1IIEW, 

Apothecaries. 


i. 


HIM Montgomery 

i a Co 

.IlitGeary 


Corner Sixteenth und Yulencia, und Twenty-first 
and Howard streets. , 


L I: 

Henry, A (; 

hi. ■■■ -"■,. Hiram 11 

J i ..-«. W 

Km.v. 1 ; 

Kin ■. v. ,., 


i'rntr;il 1'. ■!■ -< ri.' t '(.II.--.*. Ni w Y .rk 

Eclectic Medical Instil ute. Cincinnati, , 

Homoeopathic Medical College, Pennsylvania 

Medical Institute. < inncinnnti 

. in Mj d. College, Philadelphia 




None hut Fresh and Pure Drugs Dispensed. 

Our Motto: " RELIABILITY." Established 1862. 

[September 11.] 


















University MichiiMii , 

Eclectic Medical Institute, Cinnoinnatl 






























Rush Medical ' lollege. ill 

Eclectic Medical Institute, Cinneinnati 7... 

Bennett Eclectic Medical College, ' hioogo 

Eclectic Medical College, ' liicago 


































Wnnnin'- ■ ' f at Mfiw York . , 

License from University Prague, Austria 








• 
















































Rnjtpin, ("I.Lhri"! 


































PRATT'S ABOLITION OIL. 






The People's Remedy for all Lame- 






Eclectic Medical Institute, < 'inncinnal.i 

America n Eclectic Medical College, St Louis, Mo 

J.'ifvrMiti M'-.'ir.-ul I 'ollcrri-', Philadelphia 

I,..- ii ■ ! ni\.T-irv P ramie, Austria 

Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati 


Spedding, R, D 




ness and Pain. 
FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 




Self ridKO. J. M 




A. McEOYLE &, CO., Druggist*, -104 "Washington 
street. Manufacturers and Proprietors. 


S. -i.r,. W. L, 

S:iiii.I. 1- W.R.G 





















POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISC'b NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 3, 1877- 



NAME. 



ADDBESS. 



GRADUATES AT. 



Taylor, N. O Placer Co 

Thomas, F. 14 Lns Aneeles Homoeopathic MeO'cal I 'ollece. New York., 

Towksbury, M.R 'i"t Second Central Medical Collcec, !■;,,, .-In stor, X. Y. . 

T afford. J. H Eclectic Medical Institute. < 'inneinnati 

Underbill. H.J Tulare 

Webb. J. Watson Oakland 

Wilson, M. T Stockton, near Geary., 

Warren. Mrs. H. A San Jose 

Wool house. 0. E 

Warren, 0. P Oakland 

"Watson. 0. P. V Santa Clara 

Whit more. Dan. J ; 

Waimvright, Chas. C ! 

Wilcox. E. A Santa Clara 

Wolfe. C.L. de 

Wells. E.W Yuba Co 

Zwisler. E. H Butte Co 



Bennett Eclectic Medical I oil go, Chicago 

Homoeopathic Medical College, Philadelphia.. 

Western Hooe'n ; ,:itl[ie I oileao. t IcvelalOl, O. 
Eclectic Medical Institute, t inneinnati 



Eclectic Medical Institute. Cinncinuati. 



<>« vitt.r.s n. zr.n.r.. 

Apothecary, and Importer of German 
Drugs and Chemicals, 

.528 Pacific street, bet'n Montgomery and Kearny 

streets, at Dr. Zeile's new Roman-Turkish 
and Russian Steam Bath Building. Sept. 11. 



Those names marked with a star have Diplomas from the Pacific University College, an institution which has sold Diplomas for coin. A Professor of the College is 
in our list of tioiitii mi practitioners. 

The graduates of Tola/id College, prior to the time of its nnion with the University, are omitted for reasons we have explicitly stated, and which have been approved 
hy the profession generally. Persons holding diplomas from the Pam Medical Institute and Philadelphia College of Medicine are also omitted, because those institu 
tions having sold diplomas, it is impossible to discriminate between those who studied for them, and those who bought them for coin. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Recorded in the City and Connty of San Francisco. California, for the 

Week ending February 1, 1877. 
Compiled from the Records of the Mercantile Agency of John McKillop & Co., 
401 California Street, ban Francisco. 



Friday, January 26th- 



GRANTOR TO GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Mary Lehamun to H Winterbottom 

O D Shadhourne to A Berson 

Wni B Lake to A Berson 

Jno Fletoher to W W Davis 

W w Davis to Fred'k Venting.... 

L s Wclton to Rob't Bruce 

H N Torrey to W in L Torrey 

Jno Wiginore to Wm Hollis 

Henry Meyers to E C Kennedy 

Edw Gulliver to Harriet Gulliver, . 
S and L Soc'y to J de HDenuislon 

J de H Deuniston to S and L Soc'y 

W J Gunn lo Jas O'Donnell 

M Dore lo Jno T Doyle 

D DColton toSam'l Hurt 



Se Noe and Hancock, 20:0x105 

Lot IIP, Bernttl H'd 

S Army, lot) e Noe. e 80x114. subject lo 

mortgage for $500 

Lol 1, b!k 365, Great Park H'd 

Same 

E L;i_'ttna, -17:0 s Pine, 22:0x80 

Sw Stic'to and Laguna, 137:6x127:8'-., .. 
Ne Pacific and Lugiuia. u 127:8&x68:9, 

shhject to mortgage fur $4,090 

Se Clement and 31st. e 187, etc: also, sw 

Turk and Devisadcro, 137:6x375 

S Vallejo, 137:6 w Fillmore, 37:6X137:6 . . 
E Dolores, 1311:4 n 18th, e 207:1(1. nw 92, 

swi, nw20, w 181, etc 

E Dolores, 2411:4 n Kith, n 206:5. ne 147:3, 

se 215:3. w 184 to com 

S Valley, 003 e Sanchez, 51:4x114 

Blk 612— W A Tnrk. Tyler, Lyon, Scott. 
Ne Harrison und Spear. 275x270 



S 730 
300 

1.400 

425 

600 

5 

5.000 

8,700 

10,000 
1,500 

part'n 

part'n 
200 

12,800 



Saturday, January 27>h. 



Egbert Judson to C J Jansoo. 

Philip Cadttc to same 

C J Janson to Wm Hollis 



Annie Sheridan toThosSheridan 

B V H'd As'n to D FO'Neil 

Austin Wilee to Jr.o Martin 

T R E A to J E Youugberg 



Sc21st and Valencia, s 282, e467. n liO, e 
02:0 to Mission, n 120. etc 

E Valencia, 142:8 n 22d, n 90:2, e to 
Bartlett, s 130.7, w to com 

E Valencia, 142:8)1 22d. n 377:4, etc; also, 
all his intin M B 05 

Nw Laguna and Eddv, 01x51:01, 

Lot 17, blk 108, Buena Vista H'd 

Nw Nspa and Wisconsin, 101x300 

N Ridley, 255 e Guerrero, e 22x75, War- 
ranty deed 

N Ca I'a, 25 w Lyons. 50x80 

Warranty deed tntd 3-1 , com 25 e Scott, 
and 200 s Walker, w to Sco't, n to 

Walklr. e 115. etc 

M Baldridge to Eliz'th Baldridge. . IN Pine, 112 e Octavia. 50:0x137:0 
C FBiOcke toGco WCope.. 



M Stachli to J BT Duhrkoop. 
TRE A to Wm Hollis 



Wm Hollis to M Selegman... 
A Hennessy to T P Rioidau 



Ne Eddy and Laguna, 120X137:0, subject 

to mortgage 

S Geury, 300 w Steiuer, 22x82:0 

S OFurrell, 117:0 w Jones, 22x10 1:0, 50 

v 1093 in trust 

T PR'ordun to A Hennessy S O'Furrell, 115:6 w Jones, 22x08 

E P Whitmore to E R Worth Se Folsom, 82:0 sw Hawthorne, 35:6x75, 

I 100- vara 4t 



5 15 

5 

80,000 

1,025 

500 

1,000 

4,500 
2,100 



5 
Gift 



10 
4,254 



Monday, January 29th. 



Jno Sloan to City and Co S F . 
B F Bohen to Solomon Birre.. 
G W Granniss to F Billings... 



Mich'l Hyde to T W Haywards . 
JosWorrall lo Annie Worrall... 
Bennel Fallen to Lalla Fallen... 

Mary Mnury lo F M Dober 

Fred'k Lux to Wm McAfee 

R R Nnttall to Jno Parrolt 

Jno PfolT to Martin Wiegmann. 
WmH Taylor to J BHaggfo.... 



F M Smith to S Wangonheim — 
W H Furwell to R D Chandler. . . 
Jus Phelan to Agnes Howard .... 
A I liamberlin to Curl G Wolff.... 
H L Valencia to Jno Hutchinson. 

R Green to Geo Nicholas 

Edw Martin to Rhody Kelly 

Jacob Linn to Paulina Linn 

H N Bolander to A M Bolander. . . 
Jas O'Brien to Marg't J Stevens . 

Cbis Mayne to Jno P Verges 

Owen Connolly to Jno H Wise. . . 

Geo Schultz to \V T Coleman 



Lnigi Arata to Cath Arata.. 



Streets and Highways 

N Geary, 110 w Polk, 27:6x120 

W A blk 106, Sac lo, C'ul'u, Octavia and 
Laguna 

E Liskic. 232 nw Mission. 21:2x50 

E Jessie, 210 n 20th . 25x75 

S Cal'a, 81 w Webster, 54x87:6 

S Valley, 2S0:10 e Dolores, 27:1x114 .... 

W Guetrero, 183 n 2Jd, 01x117:0 

W Mnntg'y, 65. 10"^ n Cal'a. 25x70 

E Fillmore, 59:6 e tlaight, 26x90:6 

Und 'A con) in center of Georgia st, 49.) 
s of Sierra, s 35, etc ; also, sundry 
other properties .. 

N Bush, 170 w Cough. 37:6x130 

,'E Stockton, 03:0 s Chestnut, 44x137:0... 

Sw Sansonie and Clay, 120x40 

X cor Worden and Porter aves: 237x100. 

N 17th, 160 w Guerrero, w 50, n 158:7, 
ne50, s 168:3 to com 

Lots 379 and 331, Gift Maps 

Ii Shotwell, 134:3 n 24th, 22:3x122:0 

E Camino Real. 198 s ot Bernal Reserva- 
tion, I) 25, e 129, s 52, eto 

W Folsom, 221:6 s 22d. 37:0x122:0 

Lot 1. blk 5. Mission ami 30th St Ex Hd 

W Dolores, 51:0 1) 29th, 25x100 

Lot 27, hlk 47, tide lands -ranted lo Wm 

IDuuphy and others 
Se California and Front, e 91 :S, s 89:6, 
w 51:8, etc; tilso.se Suiter uudGough, 
120x275 

|N Broadway, 137:6 e Kearny, 23x58 



$ 1 
14,000 

60,000 

1 

Gilt 

Gin 

050 
3.000 
10,000 
1,100 



5 
15,000 
5,100 



100 
1,200 

Gift 
Gift 
Gift 

625 



Tuesday, January 30th. 



Jno Ormislon to Mich'l 0'K.eefe. 



C F Mentis to Caroline Rnss 
Wm J Donovuu toC Miller 



ThOB Prince to J II B Wilkins .... 

Julius Jut oils to same 

Julius Newman to Rob t Mills 



A J Pope to Jas K Prior . 



Chas F Webster to A W Starhirtl., 
.Minnie Welkins to Sophie Ravens 

Felix Byrne to Mich'l Cooney 

M Llchtenstein lo chas .lost 

1, G Harvey to H A Herlger 

Kale Pnl'en to Chas s Capp 

R de Temple to E L Suliivun 

John Morgan to Cath Morgan 

T II Wil tains to David Bixier. ... 

Rob 1 ! Watt to Chas R Steiger 

Ivlw Morton to Solomon Lorie 

A Amltndsen to Cily .Did Co S F... 

W II Conk to Caroline 3 [[off 

E VaillanttoL E Dcbonrge 

T II Selby to Thos Menzies 

Marie I Cartro lo Maria A Cartro .. 



Se Prorita av, 107 ne Mission, ne 26:8, s 
146, w 23, n 137 n com 

E cor Fol9om and Columbia. 60x125 

N California. 225:3 e Polk, » 137:6, w 
125:3, n 9:8',. c 175:6, etc 

E Broderick. 100 n Sac'to, 55:4^x110... 

Same 

S Post. 107:11 w Laguna, 8:9x137:0, W A 
231, re-recorded 

Com on ii I ol ,5i )- v ooo, lis. 9 e of nw cor 

S'll lol, Ih S tO Market, etc 

S Tyler, 55 e Buchanan, 27:0x120 

s Tv'or. 150 e Scott, 25x137:0 

,N Fell, 110c Laguna. 27:6x120 

Lots 9 and 10. hlk 335. Great Park H'd . 

N Tyler, 120 w Scott. 20x75 

lot r,:.l, Laurel Hill Cemetery 

Portion of blks 1042, 1028,1027, O L.... 

W Diipnnt, 50:0 n O Parrel!, 21X50 

Und y: se Davis and Cal'a, s 137:0, ele. . 

Ne 1st, 75 nw Nutoma, ne 187:0, etc 

X Ellis, 112:6 e Jones, 25x137:0 

Streets and highways 

Lot 1357, Laurel Hill Cemetery 

E Dartmouth, 175 s Henry. 50x120 

Sw Fillmore and Grove, 412:0x137:0 

S Grove. 50 e Octavia, 154x120 



1 850 

12,000 

Gitt 

5 

2,000 

09S 

1.000 
6.500 
Gilt 
3,850 

500 
2,100 



14.505 



451 

250 

40,000 

Gift 



Wednesday, January 31st. 



G T Wulterson to M Clements.... 

S and L Soc'y to Thos McGrath .. 

S s Miller to Behrond Joost 

Rudolph Hcrold to N Graft 

tl F t'eni'ty lo Thos Ward 

I F Thompson to C II Livingston.. 

s F Sinclair to F Cunningham — 

C J Flatlet alto C J Flalf 

1! Walt to City and Co S F 

Satn'l rieitghu tu A H Rutherford. 
B F Rolilttree to Jos Moititt 



E Mayer lo W Schteiden 

Market & 14lh St H A to Jas Dalv, 
It Avres to Franklin T Folsom.. .. 

L S Wclton to Win Hollis 

Jno R Davies to E Moriurtv 

S V H'd As'c to Jas McDatiiel.... 

Jos II t oegdon to F Buckley 

A B McCreery toT von Borstel.. 
W J Gunn lo John Slalile 



Jos Bluxome to F N Bellisle 

M Man I in to Cily and Co of S F... 
Win Hollis 10 A G Black 



Mary Howe to Chas G Hooker 

M J then lo 11.1 Shay 

Same to same 

Ben Holladuy, Jr, lo F M Holladay 
Gaston Cassou to Thco Le Roy . . . 



Se Bryant, 9) ne Glh, 50x75, subject to 
mortgage for $4,600 

N Day. 105 w Church, 25x114 

Lot 10, blk 4, Market St lid 

S Post, 137:0 w Dupont, 3I.I> xlil 

Lot 22. Ahnn Ben Atlhem Sec Plat 2, F 

s Bush, now Stoiner, 192:0x137:6 

Lots 940, 942, 944, Gift Map 4 

E 10th av, 75 n G, 50x100 

Nw Dupont and O Furrell, 30:0x30 

N Pine. 81:3 w Buchanan, 25x110 

N Clay, 137:0 w Powell, e 24:4#, n 91:8, 

elo, 11 45:10, etc 

E K ny, 68:9 n Vallejo. 63:9x137:0.... 

Sundry lois in Market & 14th St II ... 

W Douglass, tills 21th, 100x125 

Ne O'FalToll and Laguna, 55x05:0 

Lot 4, hlk Ii. College II d 

I.oi g. blk 1,8 V H'd 

S Eddv, 125 w Devisadcro, 2x137:6 

tfc Broderick and Tyler, 137:6x147:6.... 
Se Duncan and Sanchez, 5l:r,xUI0; also, 

nw Dolores and 25th, 52X100 

W Bryant, 1.57 s 24th, 25x100 

W Dupont, 25 o Post. 2 1:0x31:1 \. 

Ne O'Furrell and Laguna, 02x95, subject 

lo mortgage for £2,000 

Me Bush and Mason. 30x00 

Se Bryant, 457:0 no 3d, 21:6x80 

Sw 8th, 115 so Folsom, 25x75 

N Wash')), 137:9 e Gotigh, 58x127:8 . .. . 
Uud '„ of property described in 844 D 31 



10.500 
375 
800 

25,000 
57 

16,000 
150 
500 

42.030 
2,000 

1 

I 

9,045 

1,000 

400 

200 
3110 

1 
7,500 

1.500 
750 
250 

5.S50 
13,500 
5.000 
5,000 
Gift 
10 



Thursday, February 1st. 



J R Weller to Rockwell Stone.... 

S Cohen to Isktor Colin 

Geo Kennedy to P F Ferguson 

Job Bigwood lo lUeh'd Davis 

J J McDonnell to Win S Bell 

Jos Bluxome to A Morgaiisteiii.. 

B Met too an lo same 

M Wclton to D McGowan 

C Filz-iniiiions to C FUzsimmons 
Sam 1 H Kent to Mary J Kent 



Thos Bertram to Jno II McKay.. 



E O Andrews to B Whiting & Co. 
K Mc.Miillan to Wm H Evans 



E W Burr to Pat-'k McCoy 

R F, Wallace to Chas G Hooker .. 
[■' Cufittm.to Cornelius Buckley.:. 

Memo Voigt to L S Clark 

I. s Chirk io W STutlle 

Thos B Lewis to Chas Crocker .. 
E E Woodbury to J H Van Reek. 

I, C 1 evey to Sidney M Smith. 
W J Gnnii to Mala A Mowrv... 
Henry II Dunn to .Marg't Duun 
Pil Burnett to Rob't Mills 



S Cal'a. 137:6 wD Dupont, 39:9x120 ... 
NTnrk, 112:0 e Leav th, 25x137:6 

Sw Vicksburg and 22d, 46:6x100 

Lot 800. G'ftMapg 

F. cor 1st and Harrison. 71:0x90 

N Post, 137:6 e Buchanan. 25x137:0. .. . 

Same 

Same 

Lois 35 and 88, blk 332. N ,t H Trad. 
\\ Leav'lh, 137:6 n Post, 27:0x110, snbj 

to mortgage 

Ne 11th. 140:8 se Howard, 23:1x92, SUhj 

to mortgage for $1,400 

Lot 5. blk 309, S S F H'd & R R Ass'u. 
N 17th, 120 e Sanchez, 40x114, subject to 

mortgage fee- $400 

N T Filbert, 247:0 w Laguna, 27:0x137:0 

s Bush. 111:11 e Jones, 20x11m 

Lots ISO, 284. 2113, 204, Gift Map 3 

s Army, 240 w Church, 55x114 

Same 

r,5 acres com at nw cor of Paul Tract. 
Co n at nw cor of certain tract conveyed 
! hy Sullivan to Woodbury, etc 

... N Grove. 105 w Gotigh, 27:0x08:9 

... W Dolores, 151:0 l) Vale, 25x100 

... W Hampshire, I.sg s 200, 25x100 

...;N Washington, 195 e Druinru, 20x00... 



5 5 

10,000 

1.300 

100 

is. ) 

2.050 

2,300 

90 

Gift 

Gift 

S.OOO 

437 

225 

B35 

10,000 

1,000 

I 

8'0 



000 
8,x50 



ijji 



The Special Organ of "Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co."--Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 



Pric. p.r Copy. 15 Cem>. 



ESTABLISHED JULY SO. I«fi6 



Annual Smbacriptlon lln cold', tTfiO. 



©&S1 !^^©3SgT) 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 27. 



SAM I'itAHUltfUO, BATUKUAl, FLhEJAKx 10, ib77. 



No. 3. 



«»Hit .- ot the Man I rift It 4 in. o >nc Letter, < lima MnU, Cnllfor- 

nlift Stall Bag. South side Merchant street. Ho. «07 to U6, San Frnncisco. 

GOLD BARS- 880@900— Sii.vkk BaBS— 3@12 poent disc. Treasury 
■re Belling at '.'"«. Buying, 94$. M-xican Dollars, par @ 1 
percent, pram. Trade Dollars, pur (" 1 per oent prom. 

ay Exchange on New York, \ per oent f< * Gold ; Currency, 5\ per cent. 
premium On London, Bankers, 49 jd.: Commercial, 4*9 , l d. ; Paris, £ 
trance per dollar. 'I V!*-i.Tam3, \(aj i>er cent 

*3" Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 9th, at 3 p.m., 105|. Latest 
price of Sterling, 485®486|. 



'Price of Money here, Jj§ 1 per cent, per month— bank rate. 
open market, i^ U. lMnand a. live. 



In the 



Latest from the Merchants' Exchange.-- New York,, February 

'."tli. 1877. Gold Opened atl05f ; 11 \. M.. at Hi:.; ; ,t p.m., 10:>i. United 

States Bonds Kve-twentiea of 1867. 113f ; 1881, 110J. Sterling Ex- 
change 1 85@4 86i, ehort Pacific Mail, 24J. Wheat $160@1 60. Wert- 
era Union, U*. Hides, drv, 226< •_>-_".. iiui..-t. (til — Sperm, si -Ajfaxi 40. 
Winter Bleached, 91 65 4 l 70. Whale, 70(a75; Winter Bleached, 
Wool -Spring, tine. 22@30 ; Burry, 12@16; Pulled, 25@38. 
Fall Clips, 17(3 22 ; Burry, 16@22. London, February 9th.— Liverpool 
Wheat Market LOe, 4d.@10a. od. Club, 10s. 7d.@lls. 3d. United States 
Bonds. 11175. Consols. 95 11- Hi. 



FINANCE. 
The prospects for the coming year are assuming brighter aspects ; 
if our spring rains do not fail us, we may predict prosperity on all hands. 
Rain in the valleys will assure good crops; snow in the mountains will 
give a supply of water for our gold diggings ; new developments are re- 
ported on the Comstock, and if only one-half of what is said becomes 
true, additional wealth will pour into our lap: not that the benighted 
Stockholders individually will derive any benefit therefrom, but the coun- 
try at large will undoubtedly be the gainer of whatever millions are taken 
out of the bowels of mother earth. Money rules very easy, and goes 
begging at • > per cent, against good collaterals. The tendency of capital- 
ists is to invest only in sterling securities. Small returns are the couse- 
naen.ee, bat perfect security, the main object, is gained ; we therefore see 
Gas Bell at 115; Water, 109; Bonds bring round figures, the demand ex- 
oeeding the supply. Lastweektwo hundred and twenty-four thousand 
Virginia City Bonds, bearing 12 per cent, were taken by N. Luning ami 
Sntro & Co. at 101— a splendid investment. Silver fluctuates slightly— 
down to 57 pence to-day, and may be up or down ;} or i pence to-morrow. 
We quote fine bars 2@3 per cent discount ; Mexican and Trade, par. 

"Wooden-ware.— Strange as it may appear, yet we find that Brigham, 
Whitney & Co., of Front street, are actually importing Butter Tubs, 
three in a nest, by rail and by the carload, from West Randolph, Ver- 
mont. This seems like sending coals to Newcastle. Here we have two 
large Woodenware factories in our city, making Pails and Tubs in large 
quantities and of the best quality and material, and yet it seems that the 
'Vermont boys work even cheaper than the Chinese. How is this? We 
would like some one to rise and explain. We quote Califomian as fol- 
low-: Tails, varnished, $4; do. painted, *3 25 |;' dozen. Tubs, white or 
varnished, '■*> large in nest. $5; do. painted, 3 in nest, $3 25; do. do.. 8 in 
nest, S4 25 fc? nest Washboards, zinc, S4 I? dozen, subject to the usual 
trade discounts in round lots. — & F. Market Review. 

San Franciscans Abroad. — Paris, January 20th: Mrs. S. L. Bee, 
David Bixler, Mrs. David Bixler, Dr. R. B. Cole, Miss Josie Cole, C. 
Dorris, Mrs. C. Dorris, Mr. Donnelly, Horace Hawes, Mrs. H. Hawes, 
Mrs. Fanny Osbournc*. Miss Belle Osboume, Mr. Trinson, Mrs. Triuson, 
J. C. Williamson. Mrs. J. C. Williamson. London : A. Hoffman, Miss 
Bella Thomas. Nice : Miss F. C. Gray, D. T. Hewes. Geneva, January 
loth : Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs, Mr. and Mrs. Rabstock. Rome : W. J. 
Younger, Wm. and Mrs. Beckman. Naples, January 15th : Charles and 
Mrs. McCreary, Mrs. G. W. Mowe, Miss Mowe, F. G. and Mrs. Mer- 
chant, Baron Dacier Merchant, Mrs. Mary N. Scudder, Mrs. S. W. San- 
derson, 'William and Mrs. Beckman.— American Register, January 20th. 



Quicksilver. — The exports by sea in January were 5,017 flasks against 
4,126 same time last year. The present spot price is 42^c. _ There is an 
effort making to get up another combination, but we think it wiirbe un- 
availing. • 



Mr. F. AL-or. No. S ClenientN Lnne, London, in authorized to 
receive subscriptions, advertisements, communications, etc., (or this paper, 



fcfe^^f^ Published ififh this iveefc's issue a Four- 
Iflj^ fxt^ Page Postscript, 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF^FACT AND THOUGHT- 

The issuing of the Medical Directory by the Newt Letter in our last 
number was of great importance to medical practitioners. Those of the 
interior counties who were omitted have called at this office to know why 
their names had not the honor of being published in the Directory', as 
licenses had been granted them by the State Medical Society. The an- 
swer we gave them will possibly stagger the community, and will prove 
to them of what value persons like Doctors Gibbons. Bates and Babcock 
are as Medical Examiners when they allow their Secretary to barter for 
lucre what justly belongs to the public. We reluctantly state that we 
have applied for a list of names of practitioners who hail received li- 
censes, and at last were advised by the Secretary, Dr. W. A. Grover, that 
he wanted some coin for the list, as he was not sufficiently paid by the 
State Medical Society. We signified our willingness to pay him, say £50, 
for the privilege of copying the names. The amount was insufficient to 
satisfy the greed of the Society's Secretary. If he was impecunious the 
sin might be condoned, but the above incorporation has a number of 
wealthy practitioners in its fold, and the Secretary receives a stipulated 
price for his services. The Board of Examiuers of the State Medical So- 
ciety deserves the anathemas of all civilized communities for its course in 
not compelling its Secretary to furnish the public with the names of 
those who had received licenses. 

Australian papers state that the Chief Secretary of Victoria has 
received from the Acting Colonial Secretary of Western Australia a copy 
of a notice inviting tenders for the removal of guano from the Lacepede 
Islands, on the northwest coast of that Colony, and that the Government 
offer to grant the exclusive right of removing" guano for three years from 
July 1, 1877, the licensee to take a minimum amount of 40,000 tons during 
that period on a royalty per ton. 

Beerbohni's Telegram.— London and Liverpool, Feb. 9th, 1877.— 
Floating Cargoes, steadly held ; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 49s. ; California 
Off Coast, 50s.; do. on Passage nearly due, 51s.; do. on Passage just 
shipped, 52s.; No. 2 Spring for shipment, 48s.; English Country Markets, 
cheaper; French do., steadier; Liverpool, dull; California Club, 10s. 
8d.@llfl.; do. average, 10s. 5d.@10s. 8d.; Red Western Spring, 10s. Id. 
@10s. 9d. 

The ship ' 'Twilight" is ten years old. The vessel's ratine: at Ameri- 
can Lloyds has expired. The fwili<jhC$ destination is New York, laden 
with California wines, rags, bones, scrap iron, etc. The captain (Gates) 
feels deeply the loss of his brother, who was master of the never-heard-of 
wheat laden ship C'rciitorue, Captain Gates has many friends, who hope 
he will escape being overtaken by those terrific Antarctic winter storms. 

The stock market is very quiet. There is very little business being 
done. The men in the 1650-foot drift of Con. Virginia are still locked in. 
It is expected they will not be let out until this drift is actually developed. 
This U all wrong. If there is anything in the 1650-foot drift, the public 
should know what it is from day to day. Tlwit are stockholders. 

The German Bank has made another building loan to the Real Estate 
Associates of 6100,000 at 9 per cent, on Geary and Webster street prop- 
erty and Pacific and La gun a. 

The Electoral Commission decided last evening, by a strict party 
vote of eight to seven, that the four votes of Florida should be counted for 
Hayes and Wheeler. 

H. E. Sir Thomas Wade, K. C. B. and Lady Wade had the honor 
of dining with Her Majesty at Windsor Castle, on the 9th inst. 



Silver is quoted in London at 57d. per ounce, 925 fine ; Consols, 95f ; 
United States 5 per cent. Bonds 107|, and 103J for 4i per cents. 

Brokers are buying Half Dollars at 6£@6£ per cent, discount, and are 
selling them at 6f« 6 3 per cent, discount. 

A list of publications, received within the last week, will appear in 
our next issue. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



[From the Fortnightly Renew.] 
THE GEOGRAPHICAL ASPECT OF THE EASTERN 
QUESTION. 
One special feature of what is called the Eastern Question is the di- 
rect and immediate connection into which it brings the earliest and the 
latest times of history. In the lands with which the Eastern Question is 
concerned, the lands between the Adriatic and the Euxine — perhaps we 
should rather say the lands between the Adriatic and the Euphrates— we 
are brought close to the very earliest times in a different way from any- 
thing to which we are used in Western Europe. In Western Europe earlier 
times have influenced later times in the ordinary way of cause and effect. 
In Eastern Europe the relation between the present and the past — even 
the very remote past — is much closer than this ; we may say with truth 
that the past and the present are in being side by side ; we may say that 
several different centuries are in those lands really contemporary. This 
last fact in truth presents one of the great political difficulties of the 
country. In a newly emancipated state, say the kingdom of Greece or 
any other, some part of its area, some classes of its people, will realty be- 
long to the nineteenth century, while other parts, other classes will prac- 
tically belong to the fourteenth or some earlier century. Now a country 
which has reached, say the level of England in the fourteenth century, 
if it stands by itself, out of sight, so to speak, of the nineteenth century, 
may, if it has inborn life and a spirit of progress, develop in a steady and 
wholesome way from the starting-point of the fourteenth century. But 
if the land is placed, so to speak, within sight of the nineteenth century; 
if, while the mass belongs to the fourteenth century, it contains parts or 
classes which really belong to the nineteenth, the danger is that its devel- 
opment will not take this steady and wholesome course. The danger, like 
all other dangers, may doubtless be grappled with, and perhaps overcome; 
but it is a real danger which has its root in the history of those lands. 
One set of circumstances has caused them to lag behind the civilization 
of the West. Another set of circumstances has put the civilization of 
the West in their full view. Now an outward varnish of modern civiliza- 
tion may easily be put on. The Turk himself can do that. To attain 
the substance of sneh civilization must be the work of time, of trouble, 
perhaps of difficulties and struggles. In such a state of things, the temp- 
tation to grasp what is easiest, to think more of the outside than of the 
substance, is great and dangerous. And these dangers and difficulties 
must always be borne in mind in judging the amount of progress which 
has been made by an emancipated Eastern people. Their progress is 
likely to be real and lasting in exactly the proportion by which it is na- 
tive, and is not a mere imitation of the manners and institutions of other 
countries. But the temptation to imitate the manners and customs of 
other countries is in such a case so strong that it must always be borne in 
mind in passing any judgment on the condition of Greece, Servia, Rou- 
mania, or any other state which may arise in those parts. In estimating 
their progress, we must, in fairness as well as in charity, bear in mind the 
special difficulties under which their progress has to be made. 

This is a line of thought which might well be carried out at much 
greater length. But for my present purpose it comes in only incidentally. 
The hints which I have just thrown out show the way in which what I 
have ventured to call the co-existence of the present and the past in 
these lands has worked on their political and social state and prospects. 
My immediate business in the present paper is different. It is to show 
another result of the working of the same cause with regard to the land 
itself and its inhabitants, rather than with regard to the political and 
social development of its inhabitants. I wish now to speak on some fea- 
tures in the political geography of the country and in the distribution of 
its inhabitants, and to point out the bearing of those features upon the 
great questions of the present moment. Here at least questions of this 
sort cannot beset aside as mere "antiquarian rubbish." They are the 
very life of the whole matter. 

One main feature of the south-eastern lands is the way in which- all the 
races which have at any time really settled in the country, as distin- 
guished from those which have simply marched through it, still remain 
side by side. In many cases they remain as distinct as when they first 
settled there. This is altogether contrary to our general experience in 
the West. In the West national assimilation has been the rule. That 
is to say, in any of the great divisions of Western Europe, though the 
land may have been settled and conquered over and over again, yet the 
mass of the people of the land have been drawn to some one national 
type. Either some one among the races inhabiting the land has taught 
the others to put on its likeness, or else a new national type has been 
formed drawing elements from several of those races. Thus the modern 
Frenchman may be defined as produced by the union of blood which is 
mainly Celtic with a speech which is mainly Latin, and with a historical 
polity which is mainly Teutonic. Within modern France this one na- 
tional type has so far assimilated all others as to make everything else 
merely exceptional. The Fleming of one corner, the Basque of another, 
even the far more important Breton of a third corner, have all in this 
way become mere exceptions to the general type of the country. If we 
pass into our own islands, we shall find that the same process has been at 
work. If we look to Great Britain only, we shall find that it has been 
carried out hardly less thoroughly. For all real political purposes, for 
everything which concerns a nation in the face of other nations, Great 
Britain is as thoroughly connected as France is. A secession of Scotland 
or Wales is as unlikely as a secession of Normandy or Languedoc. The 
part of the island which is not thoroughly assimilated in language, the 
part which stl'l speaks Welsh or Gaelic, is larger in proportion than the 
non-French part of modern France. But however much the northern 
Briton may, in a fit of antiquarian politics, declaim against the Saxon, 
for all practical political purposes he and the Saxon are one. The dis- 
tinction between the Southern and Northern English — for the men of Lo- 
thian and Fife must allow me to call them by this last name— is, speaking 
politically and without ethnological or linguistic precision, much as if 
France and Aquitaine had been two kingdoms united on equal terms, in- 
stead of Aquitaine being merged in France. When we cross into Ire- 
land, we indeed find another state of things, and one which comes 
nearer to some of the phenomena of the East. Unluckily Ireland is not 
so firmly united to Great Britain as the different parts of Great Britain 
are to one another. Still even here the division arises quite as much from 
geographical and historical causes as from distinctions of race strictly so 
called. If Ireland had had no wrongs, still two great islands could 
never have been so thoroughly united as a continuous territory can be. 
On the other hand, in point of language, the discontented part of the 



United Kingdom is much less strongly marked off than that fraction of 
the contented part which remains non -assimilated. Irish is certainly not 
the language of Ireland in all the same degree in which Welsh is the 
language of Wales; The Saxon has commonly to be denounced in the 
Saxon tongue. 

If we pass further toward the East, we shall find as we go on, that 
the distinctions of race become more marked, and present nearer ap- 
proaches to the state of things in the south -eastern lands to which we are 
passing. We mark by the way that, while the general national unity 
of the Gt rman Empire is greater than that of either France or Great 
Britain, it has discontented subjects in three corners, on its French, its 
Danish, and its Polish frontiers. It will be at once answered that the 
discontent of all three is the result of recent conquest, in two cases of 
very recent conquest indeed. But this is one of the very points to be 
marked ; the strong national unity of the German Empire has been largely 
the result of assimilation ; and these three parts, where recent conquest 
has not yet been followed by assimilation, are chiefly important because, 
in all three cases, the discontented territory is geographically continuous 
with a territory of its own speech. This does not prove that assimilation 
can never take place ; but it will undoubtedly make the process longer 
and harder. But this very distinction will help us better to understand 
the special character of those parts of the world where no length of time 
seems to bring about thorough assimilation. 

It is when we come into South-eastern Europe, that is, in a large part 
of the Austro-Hungarian and in the whole of the Ottoman dominions, 
that we come to those phenomena of geography, race, and language, 
which stand out in marked contrast with anything to which we are used 
in Western Europe. We may perhaps better understand what those phe- 
nomena are, if we suppose a state of things which sounds absurd in the 
West, but which has its exact parallel in many parts of the East. Let 
us suppose that in a journey through England we came successively to 
districts, towns, or villages, where we found one after another, first, Brit- 
ons Bpeaking Welsh ; then Romans speaking Latin; then Saxons or Angles 
speaking an older form of our own tongue ; then Scandinavians speaking 
Danish ;_ then Normans speaking old French ; lastly perhaps a settlement 
of Flemings, Huguenots, or Palatines, still remaining a distinct people 
and speaking their own tongue. Or let us suppose a journey through 
Northern France, in which we found at different stages, the original 
Gaul, the Roman, the Frank, the Saxon or Bayeux, the Dane or Cou- 
tance, each remaining a distinct people, all of them keeping the tongues 
which they first brought with them into the land. Let us suppose fur- 
ther that, in many of these cases, a religious distinction was added to a 
national distinction. Let us conceive one village Roman Catholic, an- 
other Anglican, others Nonconformist of various types, even if we do not 
call up any of the remnants of the worshipers of Jupiter or of Woden. 
AH of this seems absurd in any Western country, and absurd enough it 
is. But the absurdity of the West is the living reality of the East. 
There we may still find all the chief races which have ever occupied the 
country, still remaining distinct, still keeping separate tongues, and those 
for the most part their original tongues, while in many cases the national 
distinction is further intensified by a religious distinction. Or, rather till 
the revival of the strong conscious feeling of nationality in our own 
times, we might say that the religious distinction had taken the place of 
the national distinction. This growth of strictly national feeling has, 
like most other things, a good and a bad side. It has kindled both Greek 
and Slave into a fresh and vigorous life, such as had been unknown for. 
ages. On the other hand, it has set Greek and Slave to dispute with one 
another in the face of the common enemy. 

In the great Eastern peninsula then, and in the lands immediately to 
the north of that peninsula, the original races, those whom we find there 
at the first be^iunings of history, are all there still. They form three 
distinct nations. There are the Greeks, if not all true Hellenes, yet an 
aggregate of adopted Hellenes gathered round and assimilated to a true 
Hellenic kernel. They form an artificial nation, defined by the union of 
Greek speech and Orthodox faith. This last qualification is not to be left 
out ; the Greek who turns Mussulman ceases altogether to be Greek, and 
he who turns Catholic remains Greek only in a very imperfect sense. 
Here are the oldest recorded inhabitants of a large part of the land abi- 
ding, and abiding in a very different case from the remnants of the Celt 
and the Iberian in Western Europe. The Greeks are no survival of a 
nation ; they are a true and living nation, a nation whose importance to 
the matter in hand is quite out of its proportion to its extent in mere 
numbers. They still abide, the predominant race in their own ancient 
and again independent land, the predominant race in those provinces of 
the continental Turkish dominion which formed part of their ancient 
land, the predominant race through all the shores and islands of the 
^Egean and of part of the Euxine also. In near neighborhood to the 
Greeks still live another race of equal antiquity, the Skipetar or Alba- 
nians. These, as I believe is no longer doubted, represent the ancient 
Illyrians. The exact degree of their ethnical kindred with the Greeks is 
a scientific question which lies without the ranireof practical politics; but 
the facts that they are more largely intermingled with the Greeks than 
any of the other neighboring nations, that they show a special power of 
identifying themselves with the Greeks, a power, so to speak, of becoming 
Greeks and forming part of the artificial nation, are matters of very prac- 
tical politics indeed. It must never be forgotten that, among the worthies 
of the Greek War of Independence, some of the noblest were not of Hel- 
lenic but Albanian blood. The Christian Albanian thus easily turns into 
a Greek ; and the Mahometan Albanian is something broadly distin- 
guished from a Turk. He has, as he may well have, a strong national 
feeling, and that national feeding has sometimes got the best of religious 
divisions. If Albania is among the most backward parts of the penin- 
sula, still it is, by all accounts, the part where there is most hope of men 
of different religions joining together against the common enemy. 
[To be Continued.] 

FOR SALE. 
(JN Xi\ i\f\i\ Fl ■**** Mortgage Bonds of the Nevada County 
^P<LF* *•"""" " " Narrow Gauj,'e Railroad, running between Colfax, Grass 
Valley, and Nevada City. These bonds run 20 years, from January 1, 1S76, bearing 
interest at the rate of 8 per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually at the bank of 
Wells, Fargo & Co., in this city. No more desirable investment can be offered. Will 
be sold in lots to suit [Sept. 9.] ANDREW BA1RD, No. 304 California street. 



%5ot%77 



a Week to Agents. 810 On t lit Free. 

February 10. K o. VICKERY, Auipista, Maine. 



Feb. l". L877. 



i VLIFORN1 \ 





ADVERTISER. 



CAME AND 'WIIKT. 

V . I tv\ t r ■ ■ f . . ■ '. -, « hi h I bird 

inbent, 

I ; 

I <>iiiv ki. Hid wont. 

\m i-ln-Mw loina I :* k - ■ , by gurti unriven, 

Tin* Mm' doi t< ■ content, 

Bq my wo] Ih'M tlmt moment*! hMvatij 
I oolj know aha name tnd want 

An, il .>iL. bound. i>ur iwifl iprlng heaps 
The Qfcharaa lull of bloom rod raant, 

So olova bar May my wintry sleepa; — 
I only know she ouna nnd vent. 

An ftngeJ stood end met my - 

Through the low doorway <>f my tent; 
The t.-nt i* Btrack, the vision stays; 

I only knOW Bhe came and went. 

( >, when the room grows slowly dim, 

And when the oil is nearly spent, 
One gosh of Ii,*lit these eyes will brim, 

Only to think she came and went. 

— Jtwtta Jiussetl Lowell. 

AS OTHERS SEE US. 
Dr. Petermann. the eminent Goths geographer, paid a visit to Lon- 
don ret for the purpose of attending the Arctic meeting of 
tli.' < Seographica] Society. 1 (r, Petermann was resident for a oonsidera- 
bla time in London many nan ago, end, we believe, left it with con- 
siderable reluctance to take charge of the geographical department of the 
publishing house of Perthes. In a long letter which he has written to 
the editor of the IColnitcht Z itung he describes some aspects of the life of 
London and of England as they appear to him after a 1uiil,» absence, anil from 
the tone of his remark? one may inter that he still has a fund regard for 
OUT metropolis, and looks upon it as in the fore front of all progress. He 
is not blind, however, to it- gloomy Bide. In speaking of Arctic matters, 
he states that London ia the beet way to the Pole ; and that, to judge 
from the meteorological conditions during his recent visit here, a short 
residence in I. on. [on is an excellent training for any one about to venture 
into the gloom and discomforta of s Polar winter. But the general tone 
of I»r. Petennann's observati -ins on London is so exceedingly laudatory 
that Londoners ought to be ashamed to grumble any more. "I have," 
B, "this summer been in North America, and visited some of the 
chief centers of culture there -Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia, 
N< u York, Boston, Jersey, etc, but I can assure you that London yet 
stands at the summit of culture, civilization, humanity, religion, trade, 
industry, commerce. Had it remained on its old standpoint, and ceased to 
make continued progress, then perhaps it might, at some time, be out- 
stripped by New York ; but London, England, the English, with all 
their Conservatism, continue to make rapid progress. Since I left London, 
33 years ago, vast changes for the better have been made. England, and 
its heart, London, have preserved all the good points of former days and 
have added new ones. London will yet be a beautiful town, the Thames, 
formerly not a lovely sight, has been vastly improved by its magnificent 
granite embankments. Everything in London has markedly improved 
and will continue to improve. Public life, for example, in the streets ia 
more convenient, more free from danger, more pleasant, more refined, 
more decorous, than formerly ; the streets themselves have the best pave- 
menta and troittoira in the world, and are being more and more improved 
by the substitution of wooden blocks laid upon a^phalte, producing a 
roadway liner, smoother, and more even than formerly were the floors of 
many rooms. Granite refuges or standing places, provided with gas 
lamps, are everywhere to be seen in the middle of the streets for the con- 
venience and security of the public.'" Dr. Petermann thinks that the va- 
rious means of transit in London are the best and most complete in the 
world. Omnibusses and tramcarts, cabs and hansoms, " the latter un- 
surpassed anywhere, 1 ' halfpenny steamers on the Thames, railways below 
and above ground take one everywhere inside and outside London. "The 
whole organization of this place of four millions of inhabitants is some- 
thing wonderful. The London public," the doctor is good enough to say, 
*'is more refined and better behaved than formerly ; a comparison be- 
tween the English and German capitals would probably notresult favorably 
to the latter." Dr. Petermann speaks favorably of the discipline, self-re- 
straint and obligingdisposition of our police. He, however, thinks them badly 
educated, or, more strictly speaking, not remarkably learned, since he 
failed to perceive any London policeman at the meetings of the Geo- 
graphical Society, while the gendarmes of Bonn take part in the proceed- 
ings of the Antiquarian Society of that city. England, we are told, pos- 
sesses all the products of the world in the best quality; and Dr. Peter- 
mann tells the readers of the Kolnisfu: Zeilung that there is better eating 
and drinking than anywhere else. " Food is better prepared than before, 
and wine and beer are to be had of better quality here than in wine and 
beer countries elsewhere. Our social democracy," he goes on to say, 
" deny God, religion, and the Sunday. In England the Sunday is kept 
as a day for God and man, and above all for the workman. Oh, that our 
poor misguided socialists would come to a place like London in order to 
see how honestly, industriously, punctually, vigorously, and orderly work 
is carried on there throughout the week, and then on Sunday comes the 
rest." Dr. Petermann speaks highly of our family life, and of the com- 
fort of our houses ; he speaks in terms of praise of a well-known large 
hotel, in the Strand, where, he says, one can live like a prince for what 
seems a mere trifle, and can dine at our ordinary restaurants more cheaply 
and satisfactorily than in any other town in the world. He thinks that 
our compulsory system of education has already produced marked results 
for the better, and that English socialism has had little or no effect on 
our life and progress. Altogether, we ought to feel extremely gratified at 
praise so lavish coming from so intelligent and competent an observer and 
critic, and if we go steadily grumbling and writing to the papers about 
all sorts of abuses, real and fancied, we may continue to keep as far ahead 
of any other nation as Dr. Petermann seems to think we are at present. 

A thirteen-toed baby is on exhibition in the country. If that boy 
can't toe the mark when he grows up, it will be because he hasn't the 
right kind of parents. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN. 



COLLATERAL LOAN AND SAVINGS BANK, CORNER POST AND 
KEARNY STREETS, SAN FRANCIS. 0- 

Incorporated Under the Laws of the Bute of California. 



i'r. ddsnl 






■ 



....F.S. CARTER. 
..GEO " H KKIt 



Thin Hunk i- |.r. jiiir. I to loan money upon eollnternl nceti- 
Bftvings Bank Booke, Diamonds, WarahooM fa- 
te, at from l) t'i » dot eenl per month, Tna Bank rill au , 
* the following rates of Enteral 



Deposits, and allow i 



i par oenl per month ; Twelve months, 



in nit', r 1 



int.'tv-i : Term i»> poalti ol all months, 
F 8. CARTER. Secretary. 



GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Guarantee Capital 8200,000.— Office 326 California nIhtI, 
North aide, between tfonteomerj and Keamj streets Offli bouj .fron 9 
to 8 p.m. Extra hour on Saturdays from 7 to 8 r.H, f"r recerring ol Deposita only 

Loans made on Real Estate and Other collateral securities, at current rates ol I 

President L. OOTTIO. | Secretary GEO. LETTE. 

DIRECTORS. 
F. Rm-dini;, II Bchmlodeil, Chas. Kohler, Ed. Kruse, Dan. Meyer, George H. Eg- 

gera, P . BprscMos, N. Van Bergen. Feb. 1. 

MARKET STREET BANK OF SAVINGS, 

^ 634 Market St., Opposite Palace Hotel- 

President THOMAS B. LEWIS. 

Secretary w. E. LATSON. 

Interest allowed on all deposits remaining in Bank over 
thirty days, Interest on term deposits, LS per oenl per annum. Deposits n> 
ceivedfrom one dollar upward. No charge for Bunk Book. On receipt of remit- 
tances from t|u; interior, Bank Books or Certificate* of Deposit will be forwarded or 
delivered u> ajfcnt. Bank open on Saturd ays till U o'clock P.M. October 28. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 
STOO California street, corner Webb. Capital nnd Re- 

*Ja_) -^ Berve, $231,000. Deposita, 96,619,000. Directors: James do Fremery, 
President; Albert Idler, Vice-President; u. Adolphe Low, D. J. Oliver, Charles 
Bauni. Charles Pace, Washington Bartlctt, A. Campbell, Sen., George C. Potter; 
Cashier, Lovell White. Dividends for two years past nave been 7£ and 9 per cent- re- 
!' itivetyi on ordinary and term deposita Dividends are payable semi-annually, in 
January and July. Money loaned on real estate and on United States Bondx, or 
equivalent securities. October 30. 

PIONEER LAND AND LOAN BANK OF SAVINGS AND DEPOSIT. 

Southeast corner Calif omln and Montgomery streets, Safe 
Deposit Blt.ick. Incorporated IjjuU Guarantee Fund. $200,000. Dividend No . 
102 payable on December 5th. Ordinary debits receive 9 per cent. Term de- 
posits receive 12 per cent. This incorporation is in its eighth year, and refen to 
over 4,900 depositors for its successful and economical management. 

H. K0FAHL, Cashier. 
Thos. Grat, President. J. C. Duncan, Secretary. March 27 

MAS3NIC SAVINGS AND 10AN BANK, 

No. 6 Post street, Masonic Temple, San Francisco, Cnl.»-- 
Moneys received on Term and Ordinary Deposits ; dividends paid semi- 
annually ; loans made on approved security. This bank solicits the patronage of all 
persons. [March 25.] H T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL. S300.000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 



411 

interest. 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bnsb street, above Kearny, O. Mahe, Director. Loans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and California Sts. 

CAPITAL S2.O0O.000. 

This Company is nonopen for the renting of vaults and the 
transaction of all business connected with a Safe Depository. Pamphlets giving 
full information and rates can be obtained at the office of the Company. Hours, 
from Sa.ii. to 6 P.M. September 18. 

MAURICE DOSE & CO-, AUCTIONEERS. 

HA. Cobb, Auctioneer. —Special Great Real Estate Sale, 
• at Man's Hall, Montgomery street, on MONDAY, February 12th, 1877, at 12 
Noon. We will sell, on the moat liberal terms ever offered in this City or State, FOUR 
ENTIRE BLOCKS OF LAND, bounded by Folsom, Harrison, Twelfth, Thirteenth 
and Fourteenth streets, well knowu as the CITY GARDENS, Subdivided into 100 
Large Building Lots. Feb. 3. _ 

ODORLJ SS 

Excavating: Apparatus Company of San Francisco.--Empty- 
ing Vaults, Sinks, Cessiwols, Sewers, Cellars, Wells and Excavations in the day- 
time without offence. Orders left at the following places will receive prompt atten- 
tion: Madison &l Burke's, corner Sacramento and Montgomery streets; Office Super- 
intendent of Streets, City Hall; Office, 012 Commercial street, or addressed to Presi- 
dent, Post Office box in. City. Feb. 3. 

W. Morris. Jos. Schwab. J. F. Kenned?. 

MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO, 

Importers and Dealers In Moldings, Frames, Engravings, 
Chromos, Lithographs, Decalcomanie, Wax and Artists' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

STUART 8. WRIGHT, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, So. 504 Kearny street, 
San Francisco, California. Feb. 3. 

QTJICKSILVER, 

For sale—In lots to snlt, by Thomas Bell, No. 305 Sansome 
street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



F 



NOTICE, 
or the very best photographs go to Bradley A Rulofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



G. G. GARIBALDI. 
Fresco and Decoration, Nevada Block, No.'s 73 and 74. 

[January 13.] 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



THEATRICAL, ETC. 

Grand Opera House. — Manager Wheatleiph may be said to have 
struck pay rock at last. Mound the World in EigJity Days bas proved a 
genuine success, as the crowded and enthusiastic audiences of the week 
have abundantly testified. The piece possesses a happy union of the 
gorgeously spectacular with an amount of "go" and excitement that is 
very telling. The first praise is undoubtedly due to ilr. Voegtlin, whose 
brush never gave a better account of itself than in the new scenery— the 
Pagoda scene, especially, being beyond criticism and thoroughly deserving 
of 'the enthusiastic call given the artist upon the opening night. The 
railroad scene is another excellent effect, and may be set down as the very 
best stage representation of a train of cars ever seen in this country — 
not excepting New York. Among the company, Mr. Lingham's part of 
"Fogg," the Englishman, is the most important. While he has a very 
complete idea of the character, Mr. Lingham's delivery is methodical and 
automatic to a fault. It becomes pedantic and unnatural at times. Mr. 
Wheatleigh gave an impersonation of the American, "Bennett," that 
grows perceptibly stronger each evening, and could easily be made a most 
capital bit of character acting. Mr. Polk was funny as "Passe-partout," 
but did less with the part than with anything he has essayed lately. His 
idea of the character is quite correct, however, the grumbling of some of 
the critics to the contrary notwithstanding. Verne wrote the faithful 
servant as a very Anglicized Frenchman indeed. Miss Carey had the 
female portion of the cast very much to herself, and did what little she 
had to do very charmingly. Her costumes are all extremely striking and 
becoming all through, notably her Hindoo dress. Mr. Kennedy did a 
variety of character acting throughout the piece, the success of which can 
be best judged from the fact that he constantly deceived the audience in 
his several assumpti3ns. The same, in a degree, can be said of Mr. 
Bradley. In a word, the new piece is the most emphatic success as yet 
made by this house, and it is safe to predict will be by far its longest run. 
The only thing we can suggest improvement regarding is tWbalkt, which 
could well be omitted on its own merits, as well as what might be called 
the Spindle-shank Parade that precedes it, and which is led by an attenu- 
ated siren whose " visible means of support" certainly does not lie in the 
lower part of her limbs, and whose face offers no compensation for the 
deficiency. 

California Theater.— On Thursday evening Mr. Sothern replaced the 
Hornet's Nest with Davy Garrick. We cannot leave the former rather 
nondescript production without reference to one of the most exquisite lit- 
tle bits of acting we have ever seen upon the stage of the California. 
Theatergoers need hardly be told that we refer to the scene in the last act 
between "Spoonbill" (Mr. Sothern) and "Carrie" (Miss Wilton.) It h 
the love-making of to-day done in the most admirably natural and genu- 
ine manner— such as we almost never see upon the stage. If, as is 

alleged, Mr. S wrote the scene in question himself, then his laurels aa 

a dramatist bid fair to equal those he so worthily wears as an actor. 
Davy Oarrick was most excellently placed upon the stage and charmingly 
played throughout. In no sense, however, can it be considered one of the 
comedian's best creations. Mr. Sothern is essentially an actor of modern 
parts. He is absolutely at home only in the most thoroughly nowadays, 
conventional characters in which he has made his great hits. He fell par- 
ticularly short in his power of individualizing the part; notably in the 
drunken scene, where he acts a part within a part. Here he failed chiefly 
in impressing his audience with the straiD under which his mimicry of 
drunkenness was given, and the mental distress of the man underneath. 
Mr. Bishop's " Squire Olivy" was a remarkable piece of comedy, and one 
that shows the versatility and keen study of this actor in a very marked 
degree. Miss Wilton gave us some of her best work as "Ada Ingot," and 
dressed the part superbly. It has long passed into an adage that Mrs. 
Judah can do nothing poorly. The other characters do not call for espe- 
cial mention, if we except Mr. Edwards' "Simon Ingot," a better as- 
sumption of which dense old party we have yet to see. The afterpiece, 
Dundreary Married and Settled, is simply the magnificent ninny played in 
a somewhat minor key. To-day and to-night Our American Cousin says 
good-by to San Francisco for a time. On Monday evening the Edwin 
Adams benefit occurs, to be followed on Thursday by that of Miss Alice 
Harrison, for both of which events the boxes and seats are going very 
rapidly. 

The ladies of San Francisco and Oakland have not forgotten Camilla 
Urso's generous gift of $900 to the Brooklyn sufferers. This sun was the 
gross proceeds of her first concert. The long and seemingly endless list of 
names of the lady patronesses at Madame Urso's benefit on Tuesday next, 
the 13th instant, is an evidence of the unanimous desire of the community 
to express their admiration of Madame Urso as an artist and a beneficent 
lady. The grand chorus at her benefi t embraces 150 voices from the Handel 
and Haydn and Harmonic Societies, with an orchestra of forty musicians. 
M. Auguste Sauret will play a piano solo, and Madame Urso is under- 
lined for two numbers. 

Mr. C. B. Bishop, the excellent comedian of the California Theater, 
and a prince of good fellows withafe is underlined for a benefit on Satur- 
day evening, the 17th February. Tom Taylor's great comedy of the 
Victhns will be given first, to be followed by Byron's burlesque of Alad- 
din, or the Wonderful Scamp. Apart from the excellence of the attrac- 
tions, it is worthy of note that this is Mr. Bishop's first benefit in San 
Francisco, and as no one ever came here whose popularity has equaled 
that of the beneficiary, it 
crowded from floor to dome. 

The Urso Concert —This long talked of concert will take place at 
the Academy of Music on Tuesday next. The programme is a most ex- 
ceptionally fine one, ami also gives unusual scope to the powers of this 
very remarkable artist. The affair is under the patronage of our most 
fashionable ladies, and may be considered quite a society event. The seats 
are being rapidly taken. 

Academy of Music. --Little Zoe Tuttle has quite fulfilled the ex- 
pectations of her friends and admirers, and her part in All for Gold may 
be called a juvenile hit of no mean character. The infantile star received 
a very well-deserved complimentary letter from Mr. Sothern this week. 
The piece draws well. 

Pacific Hall. —The Tennessee Jubilee Singers are doing a somewhat 
slim business here, inconsequence, doubtless, of the pressure of attractions 
elsewhere. 

The sole agents for Krug Private Cuvee are Hellmann Brothers & 
Co., 525 Front street. 



that of the beneficiary, it is fair to presume that he will have a house 



PARAGRAPH IANA. 

Pro Bono Publico. 



Maurice Dore & Co. , the Real Estate, Stock and C4eneral Auc- 
tioneers, of 410 Pine street, announce a special great real estate sale at 
Piatt's Hall, on Monday next, at noon. They will sell on the most liberal 
terms ever offered in this city or State, four entire blocks of land, bounded 
by Folsom, Harrison, Twelfth, Thirteenth and Fourteenth streets, hith- 
erto known as the City Gardens, subdivided into 100 large building lots. 
This property is within 2,800 feet of the New City Hall, and within 2,800 
yards of the Palace Hotel, and reached by five different lines of street 
cars, one of them passing in front of the property every five minutes. The 
terms of sale are 20 per cent, cash in U. S. gold coin ; "the balance in eight 
(8) equal .yearly payments, to bear interest at the rate of seven and a half 
(7i) per cent, per annum, the deferred payments secured by mortgage. 
To those desiring to pay all cash, a deduction of one year's interest, or 
7A per cent., will be made on deferred payments. Maps of the estate, and 
all other information, can be obtained of Maurice Dore & Co., and the 
galleries of Piatt's Hall will be reserved for ladies who may wish to attend 
the sale. 



The dear ' 'Little Sisters " gave a sociable last evening at Pacific 
Hall for the benefit of the "Infant Shelter.'' Sociables are invariably 
pleasant reunions, only this notice is not given with an intent to describe 
the features of the happy gathering. Its object is to remind our readers 
of the good work being done by the "Little Sisters," and to suggest to 
them that they can, at all times, subscribe to this most deserving charity. 

The sale of ready-made clothing at the store of J. M. Litchfield 
& Co. has attracted a great deal of attention this week. The reputation 
which the firm has long enjoyed for keeping first-class goods, both ready- 
made and custom-made, makes it a very easy matter for them to clear out 
any line of clothing at short notice, but at present they are offering special 
advantages to the public such as rarely occur. 

The Baltimore Evening "Bulletin," in addition to its merits as a 
trustworthy exchange very ably edited, is also one of the liveliest dailies 
published in tbe United States. It is under the skillful management of 
Mr. W. Mackay Laffan. Some years ago his pen graced the pages of the 
News Letter, and it is with unqualified pleasure that we note Mr. Laffan's 
success in his new sphere. 

The "Examiner," under the able editorship of Colonel Philip 
Roach, is slowly and surely getting to be the best evening paper on this 
coast. It has of late improved so materially and exhibited such vigor in 
all its departments that our passing tribute to its worth is but a base act 
of justice. 

BATDWIN'S ACADEMY OF MTJ3IC. 

Market street, between Stockton anil Powell.— Madame 
CAMILLA OftSO'S BENEFIT CONCERT (under the patronage of the ladies 
of San Francisco and Oakland) will take place on TUESDAY EVENING, February 
13th, with the assistance of MR. AUGUSTE SAURET, the eminent Pianist, THE 
HANDEL AND HAY'DN SOCIETY of San Francisco, THE HARMONIC SOCIETY of 
Oakland, combined, forming a Grand Chorus of 150 Voices, under the direction of Mr. 
John P. Morgan, and a Grand Symphonic Orchestra of Forty Musicians, conducted 
by Mr. R. HeroM. Scale of Prices : Proscenium Boxes, $15 ; Mezzanine Boxes, --'10 ; 
Reserved Seats, $1 50 ; Admission, $1. The sale of seats at Gray's Music Store, No. 
105 Kearny street. February 10. 

MAGUIRE'S OPER& HOUSE. 

Bash street, between Montgomery ami Kearny. — Thos. 
Maguire, Proprietor and Manager. Monday Evening, February 12th, and ev- 
ery evening, an Array of Minstrel Talent. New Faces ! New Aets ! First Appear- 
ance of MAGUIRE'S CALIFORNIA MINSTRELS. The world-renowned John Hart, 
Billy Arlington, Johnson and Bruno, R. T. Tyrrell, Beaumont Retd, Ernest Linden, 
Frank Moran, W. Mureland, Sheridan and Mack, Joe Noreross, \V. H. Gilla. James 
Morrison, and a full and efficient orchestra. Grand Matinee Saturday Afternoon. 

NEW BELLA UNION THEATEE. 

Kearny street, between Washington anil Jackson.— Samuel 
Tetlow, Proprietor. CHARLEY REED, Ethiopian Comedian, Character Ar- 
tist and Stump Speech Orator. THE WYMANS, ALFRED and LULU, Specialty and 
Sketch Artists. CARRIE LE )N and SAM SWAIN, the Celebrated Acrobatic Son? 
and Dance Artists. SHED LeCLAIR, the Great Flying Trapeze Artist. MADGE 
AISTON, Song and Dance Artist. EDWARD GLOVER, the Celebrated Australian 
Comic Singer. The Great Double Company in Comedy, Farce and Drama. Feb. 10. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Bush street, above Hearny.—.Iohn McCnllong;h. Proprietor 
and Manager; Barton Hill, Acting Manager. The Testimonial to EDWIN 
ADAMS, by his friends in San Francisco MONDAY EVENING, February 12th. 
Programme : T. H. Bayly's comedietta, entitled FORTY AND FIFTY, by the Grand 
Opera House Company. Specialties by MISS KATIE MAYHEW (the above by per- 
mission of Charles Wheatleigh, Esq.) Robertson's charming comedy of HOME, by 
Mr. Sothern and the California Theater Company ; and other entertainments. Feb. 10. 

BALDWIN'S ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

Market street, between Stockton anil Powell. —This Eve- 
ning, February 10th, the greatest hit of the season, the wonderful child ac- 
tress, LITTLE ZOE TUTTLE, in ALL FOR GOLD! Immense Success of H. M. 
BROWN as " Caleb Cobb " and " Professor Pogue." Grand Saturday Matinee. Mag- 
nificent Original Scenic Effects, Music and Appointments. Feb. 10. 

CALIFORNIA THEATEE. 

John 3h-< niiou-ih. Proprietor anil Manager; Barton Hill, 
Acting Manager Lastnightof the engagement of MR. SOTHERN. Saturday 
Matinee and Night, OUR AMERICAN COUSIN. Lord Dundreary, MR. SOTHERN. 
Monday Evening, February 12th— THE EDWIN ADAMS' TESTIMONIAL. Tuesday 
Evening, February 13th— Debut of MISS ROSE MOSS. Thursday, February 15th— 
Benefit of ALICE HARRISON: February 10. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Mission street, between Third and Fourth.— Acting- Man- 
ager, Mr. Chas. Wheatleigh ; Scenic Artist, Mr. Wm. Voegtlin. THE TOUR 
OF THE" WORLD IN EIGHTY DAY'S ! The most magnificent production ever wit- 
nessed in California. Every evening at S o'clock. Grand Matinee on Saturday at 
2 o'clock P.M. February 10. 

CA7I?0RNIA THEATER. 

First Benefit in San Francisco of* Mr. C. B. Bishop. Satnrday 
Evening, February 17th. Tom Taylor's great comedy, THE VICTIMS, and 
Henry J. Byron's laughable burlesque, ALADDIN ; or, THE WONDERFUL 
SCAMP ! February 10. 






Feb. 10, i- 



OALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



HIS SAT. MAJESTY " P.TCHES HIS TINT ' IN 'FRISCO, AND 
DULY OBSERV1S THE SABdATH. 

A Devfl"! II a - yourself Your n w , air 1 I am glad 

I'm nearly driven mad I 
- - Washington? and pledged the loving cop 

\\ ith II iy« i! I '!,■ ii itruck old Tilden, ana mi tit up I 

t> pair of duffera ' B tch haa bet thai he will win, 

\\ hi!.- If rant smQea iweetly and remains tl i.\ 

Boards, Courts and State Committees, tome dosen more "r leas, 
All do U irk like men and oompUcate the men ! 

. 'i oan beat it, I'm back, ana think I'll stay: 
Bo have taken up my quarters with an old-time chum, Prod G y. 
11 - use 1 I ■ me and know.- my ways; besides 1 have no scruple 
pting slight attentions from my oldest friend and pupil ! 
mpliment '11 be returned him, for when be i.-* my guest 
He U -'. v Forever ! on thai score my mind ia quite at rest ! 

I iv ! Let's decide now the warning church l>ell tolls — 
How t" pass the Sabbath, and In passing save oar souls. 
I'm "tr to K-ill mill, as 1 hear that's where to go, 

If 1 want t<» form th acquaintance of my future friends below ! 

the hypocritaa ! The beads bowed down in contrite prayer, 

in the week can gamble, drink, embezzle, rob and Bwear ! 
Just watch their tears ! They're priceless, if only they were Bold; 

drop's a quart of brimstone, and it's worth its weight in gold ! 
Then the dry old " sticks" that shed them,n bat a rousing fire they'd raise; 
HI bet wi down in hell could make one-half the Maze ! 

There's Deacon Fitch, for one. 111 swear: ami his mate in crime. Old 

Pick, 
Would make a glorious bonfire, tho' the smell would make one sick ! 
Where's Michael Reese? They'll miss him sore when it's time to pass 

the hat— 
1 1 ; ■■ elcome, for it's Boarce, and miiey small at that ! 

\S h a else i-. there! The weather's line; I'd like to see the way 
Your Christian martyrs, out ol church, put in their holy day! 
North Beach, I vote! Let's toddle there, and see the " missing link," 
The kangaroos and cockatoi >, regardless <-f the stink ! 
Uore "saving grace f A preacher h( re ! The mixture's odd enough — 

tan and parsons, all combined— the toughest of the tough ! 
The Atlantic" eh? Let's take it in ! Von say they're all Pacific! 
Hurrah ! for beer and " Peddler Jim !" for " blues" a cure specific ! 
What's this they're at ? " Pull down your vest !" You may not think it 

wrong. 
Put it's hardly what, on Sundays too, you'd call a sacred song. 
[Things may be changed since I was there, hut I've heard old Michael say 
That the saints abovi are mighty strict 'bout what they sing this day. 
But whafs the odda? They know their " biz;" they're old enough to see 
Their cban.es tlurt are all so slim that they are practising for me ! 
Maybe I'm judging hastily, tho'. These j;rimy sons of toil 
Are not a sample of your " ton n — th 1 idea would make them boil. 
Your "upper ten" are different. 'Tis only hard-worked Pat, 
WIld, " wrestling 1 ' all the week, to-day enjoys the like o' that. 
All right, my swells; then please explain. What means that bill of fare: 
"Wade's Opera Bouse to-night at eight?" D'ye see that placard there ? 
An opera only? Sunday's play ! You think a change of bill 
Don't interfere with higher needs, and you're all "hunky" still! 
A ballet, faith, would never do ! But what's the reason why? 
The Beauclerc Sisters gone away! No flirting on the sly ! 
The same with concerts, I suppose? When there's "nothing on" to please 
You're pious — stay at home, and play religion at your ease; 
But let Camilla's winning face appear again once more, 
Your home's a pigpen — Sunday's slow— your wife a tattling bore. 
If that's your creed it's all a sham— a lie — a hollow fraud. 
To serve iiourxilf, then, if it suits; perhaps to serve the Lord — 
Convenient doctrine! Don't you know this compromise with evil, 
Instead of Heaven, only helps to send you to the devil? 
Such cant! such humbug! Be a man! Have pluck and learn to choose! 
Is't Hell or Heaven ? Y ou've the cards — then play to win or lose. 
A week of sin — a day of prayer: the two can ne'er agree. 
No middle course. Make up your mind — decide; which shall it be ? 
This blind-fold faith map be all right; you may come out all clear — 
But the " golden maxim" can't be beat— at least, that's my idea. 
An honest life, a blameless course, some coin to pay one's dues; 
No slandering; and when asked to drink, drink always — don't refuse! 
And so I won't! since you're so kind, tho' I have some slight compunction, 
For Wheeler's heard I like it so that he has issued an " injunction " 
To stop my grog, and begs to hint what he thinks proper tipple: 
Some soft stuff, chloral hydrate. But I guess I'll make the " riffle," 

Anxl then skedaddle C y'll be mad. I'd hate to have a muss, 

Especially with so old a friend as he. So long-, old cuss! 



THE QUEEN'S SPEECH. 

[From the Telegraphic Dispatches to the San Francisco "Chronicle."] 
London, February 8th. —Following is the Queen speech in full : 
My Lords and Gentlemen : With much satisfaction I again resort to the 
advice and assistance of my Parliament. The hostilities which, before 
the close of the last session of Parliament, had broken out between Tur- 
key on the one hand and Servia and Montenegro on the other have en- 
gaged my most serious attention. I anxiously awaited an opportunity 
when my good offices, together with those of my allies, might be usefully 
interposed. This opportunity presented itself by the solicitation of Servia 
for our mediation, the offer of which was ultimately entertained by the 
Porte. In the course of negotiations I deemed it expedient to lay down, 
and, in concert with other powers, submit to the Porte, a certain basis 
upon which I held that not only peace might be brought about with the 
principalities, but that the permanent pacification of the disturbed prov- 
inces, including Bulgaria, and the amelioration of their condition might 
be effected. As agreed to by the Powers, they required these conditions 
to be extended and worked out by negotiation or 'in conference, accompa- 
nied by an armistice. The Porte, though not accepting the basis and 
proposing other terms, was willing to submit them to the equitable con- 
sideration of the Powers. While proceeding to act in this mediation, I 
thought it right, after inquiry into the facts, to denounce to the Porte the 
excesses alleged to have been committed in Bulgaria, and express my 
reprobation of their perpetrators. An armistice being arranged, the Con- 



lonle for the oonridoration of these ixl 
rdanoc with th.- original basis, in which Conl 
nted hj o ipeoial onvoj . as woU ai by n>\ Embassador to Turkey. 
In takL 

of (Europe and bring about n betl ul for the dl 

provinces, without mfringing upon the tudepi i of the 

Ottoman Empire. Ths proj J 

not, ] regret to say, been accepted by th< Porte, bu I of the 

i Conference baa '■■ en to show the existence ol a ■ ■ mi d1 among 

tlic European Powers which cannot fail to have an 
upon the condition and overument of Turkey. In the mean time the 
armistice between Turkey and the Principalities ha i .-.land 

is still unexpired, and mai . I trust, lead to the conclnsion of an honorable 

in these affairs 1 have acted in cordial cooperation with mj 
with whom u with the foreign Powers my relations continue to be of a 
friendly character. 

Papers on other subjects will be forthwith laid before you. My assump- 
tion of the Imperial title at Delhi was welcomed by the Chiefs and the 
people of India with professions of affection and loyalty most grateful to 
my feelings. It is with deep regret that I have to announce a calamity in 
that part of my dominions, which will demand the most earnest watch- 
fulness on the part of my government there, A famine not less serious 
than that of 1S73 has overspread a large portion of the presidencies of 
Madras and Bombay. I am confident that L-wry resource will lie em- 
ployed, not merely in the arrest of this present famine, but in obtaining 
fresh experience for the prevention or mitigation of such visitations in the 
future. 

The prosperity and progress of my Colonial empire remains unchecked, 
although the proceedings of the Government of the Transvaal Republic, 
and the hostilities in which it has been engaged with neighboring tribes, 
have caused some apprehensions for the safety of my subjects in Smith 
Africa. I trust, however, that the measures which I have taken will suf- 
fice to prevent any serious evil. 

Gentlemen of the House of Commons, I have directed the estimates of 
this year to be prepared and presented to you without delay. My Lords 
and Gentlemen, bills relating to the Universities of Oxford and Cam- 
bridge, and for amending the law as to bankruptcy ami letters patent for 
inventions, will be laid before you. You will be asked to constitute one 
Supreme Court of Judiciary in Ireland, and to confer an equitable juris- 
diction on the County Courts of that country. I commend to you these 
and other measures which may be submitted for your consideration, and 
trust that the blessings of the Almighty will attend your labors and direct 
your efforts. 



SIGNAL SERVICE METEOROLOGICAL REPORT, WEEJ 
ENDING FEB. 8, 1877. SAN" FRANCISCO, CAL. 





Highest and 


Lowest Baromete 


*. 




Frl. 2. 


Sat. 3. 


Sun 4. 


Mou. 5. 


Tues 6. 


Wed 7. 

30.11 
30.05 


Thr 8. 


30.32 
30.18 


311.34 
30.23 


30.23 
30.15 


30.10 
30.12 


30.15 
30.08 


30.00 
29.98 



63 

50 

SO 
\V. 
142 
Fair. 

.01 



I 



Maximum and Minimum Thermometer. 

02 I 04 I 61 I 03 I 64 

50 , 50 I 60 49 | 50 

Mean Daily Humidity. 
72 | 62 | 78 | 67 | 

Prevailing Wind. 
NW. | N. | NW. | N. | 

Wind — Miles Traveled. 
120 | 141 | 175 | 132 | 

State of Weather. 
Clear. | Clear. | Clear. | Fair. | 
Rainfall in Twenty-four Hours. 
III! 



Total Rain During Season beginning July t, J876 



07 | 


79 


N. | 


N. 


101 | 


83 


Clear. | 


Fair. 


1 
76... 8.07 


inches 



SANITARY NOTES. 

One hundred and twenty -one deaths occurred in the city this week, 
as compared with 159 last. This is a happy improvement, which it is to 
be hoped will continue. There were 50 deaths under 5 years of age, 15 
between 5 and 20 years, 47 between 20 and 60 years, and 9 over that 
age. There were 77 males and 44 females. Of deaths from zymotic dis- 
eases 28 were diphtheria, 4 fever, 4 small-pox and 2 scarlatina; 2 persons 
died of paralysis, 3 of apoplexy and 3 of brain disease; of respiratory dis- 
orders the deaths were: 3 croup, 2 bronchitis, 1 hemoptysis, 2 congestion 
of the lungs, 10 consumption, 7 pneumonia, 1 pleurisy; there were 7 
deaths from heart disease, and 1 from aneurism; there was only one acci- 
dental death and 2 suicides. _ Small-pox is again declining; only 17 fresh 
cases have been reported this week. The mortality from diphtheria is 
still frightful, but with this exception the health of the city is manifestly 
improving. 

The Homeopathic Board of Medical Practitioners have granted 
licenses to two men who had simply licenses from other medical societies. 
This is a very strange proceeding. The other medical societies, with all 
their faults, would have rejected such curious credentials. Most of the 
respectable Homeopaths have severed all connection with the above board 
and have taken licenses from the Eclectic Medical Society. In our last 
issue of the Medical Directory, under the heading, " Graduated at," 
spaces were left blank that should have been filled with the words, 
"Passed examination." 

The Palace hop, on Thursday evening, was the most brilliant of the 
season. The near approach of Lent will put a stop to them temporarily, 
but the last party crowned with triumph a series of the most elegant 
sociables ever devised in San Francisco. 



O 



©100,000. 
iieHnndreil Thousand Dollars to loan in small sums, on 

collateral security, at TUK MARKET STREET BAN'K uF SAY1XUS. Feb. 10. 



K. W- SPRAGUE, M.D., 
Post street, comer Kearny. Office Hours, 10 to 12 ; 2 to 

4 ; 7:30. Diseases of Throat and Lungs a specialty. February 10. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



COLUMN FOR THE CURIOUS, 

In Nature* Science, and Art. 

An Archaeological Art Treasure. — Whilst demolishing the houses 
for opening the new Boulevard Henri IV., a splendid bas-relief, dating 
from the latter portion of the sixteenth century, was picked up, represent- 
ing Hell. This valuable specimen of Christian iconography had been 
sunk for centuries in modern decorations. A statue of the Virgin was 
standing on the head of a hideous monster, representing the entrance to 
the lower regions. The gaping mouth of the monster shows a female Sa- 
tan seated on her throne, and enchained ; a man and woman in an obscene 
position, suspended by their tongues, and representing, no doubt, un- 
conthness ; Judas, hanging likewise, with his entrails protruding : two 
caldrons filled with the lost, and one wretch impaled from end to end. 
Two little demons, standing right and left on the monster's feet, are 
waiting impatiently for a cartful of reprobates, amongst whom may be 
noticed a monk, a bishop, and a crowned head. The bas-relief is rather 
mutilated, but probably what remains yet hidden is in a better state of 
preservation. After proper restoration this curious bas-relief will be sent 
to the Musee de Cluny. 

An Astronomical discovery. — The Spectator says: Our readers will 
be interested in learning that a sun, constituted apparently of very much 
the same chemical substances as our own, has suddenly assumed a bril- 
liance which implies an enormous addition to the intensity of its heat as 
well as its light, so that its planets — if it have any, and if they were pre- 
viously to this conflagration the abodes of life — are probably now under- 
going combustion themselves, while the inhabitants have ceased to be. 
Will our sun imitate this f reak, and in one of its great outbursts of hy- 
drogen flame scorch us suddenly to a cinder? Or may we hope that the 
planets of this conflagrating world had already so far Cooled down as to 
exclude the possibility of life, and that this sudden outburst of new light 
and heat may rather restore past possibilities than extimruish new ones? 
At all events, our astronomers are now beholding one of the great ca- 
tastrophes of a far-away world. 

Mr. Menier has invented a new contrivance for the steering of bal- 
loons. The mechanism is placed behind the car, and by a clever ar- 
rangement of network acts upon a belt which encircles the body of the 
baloon, extending about four or five degrees above and below a horizontal 
plane through its center — its equator, so to say. The rudder is plane, 
and can be used as a sail. The balloons are said to move obliquely, up- 
ward and downward, and also sideways, according to the position of the 
rudder. The sideway motion is very likely facilitated by changing the 
ballast. One circumstance, which may be of special practical use, is that 
a balloon provided with this new apparatus, when falling to the ground, 
can be made to touch the earth's surface very obliquely, and thus avoid 
any sudden shock, and at the same time facilitate a safe anchoring. 

The Compagnie Francais de Materiel de Chemins de Fer, at 
Ivry, is now building a Bpecial type of carriages for service on the little 
railway between Bayonne and Biarritz. The designer is M. Cariman- 
traud. The framework is entirely in iron ; in spite of their large size the 
weight of the carriage is relatively small ; the panels of the body are 
made of thin slips of wood, covered on both sides with varnished canvass. 
There is a covered upper story, and an interior staircase ; each carriage 
is arranged for three classes, and has a goods department and smoking 
platform as well. The open spaces are as large as possible, to permit good 
views being taken. Petroleum is used for lighting ; the lamps are so ar- 
ranged as to give light to the interior and at the same time show the sig- 
nals. Each carriage, when full, accommodates ninety-two passengers. 

Flour Packages for Shipment —A correspondent of the Miller 
states that he has shipped flour packed in double-twilled five-bushel sacks 
made from hemp, weighing, when new, perhaps four pounds each, and 
holding full 2801bs. of flour. During a period of seven years no case oc- 
curred of reduction in price through "shortage," and, when once a full 
sack fell overboard, it was recovered so little damaged that it sold for 
very nearly the full price. It is further alleged that flour in good sacks 
need not be pressed so much as in barrels, and is consequently not so lia- 
ble to become sour. 

The excavations at Olympia have produced new valuable results. 
The horses' necks of a quadriga, and the torso of a female figure have 
been discovered, so that only four or five figures are still wanting for the 
reconstruction of the whole frontispiece composition. The most import- 
ant find is a well-preserved female head, the creation of Alkamenes, the 
11 second master after Phidias," as Pausanias calls him. A metric dedica- 
tory inscription was also discovered, which Pausanias had read, but not 
copied. The inscription is perfectly preserved. 

Flames Male and Female. — At the Royal Institution, the other 
evening, in the third lecture of the "juvenile course,' 1 Dr. Gladstone de- 
scribed " the various kinds of flames." Among these, however, from a 
report of his lecture, he appears to have made no mention of the "old 
flame," remembered by most men as once so extremely bright and beau- 
tiful, but as liable to grow in the hartf hands of Time quite the reverse of 
either beautiful or bright. 

A correspondent sends us the intelligence that an urn of old coins, 
dating 200 years after Christ, has been dug from the Cloud-hill lime 
rocks, Bredon, Leicestershire. The workmen making the discovery, it is 
stated, sold them. Subsequently the Secretary of State became ac- 
quainted with the circumstances, and by a special representative sent to 
the locality and claimed them as "treasure trove" belonging to the Crown. 

Shakspeare in Hindustani —The Pioneer Mail says: "Parsee dram- 
atists are in strength at Delhi. Two Parsee theaters have been opened 
there, one near the Jumma Musjid, and one outside the Lahore Gate of 
the city. The performances will be in Hindustani and English. One of 
the troupes will produce several of Shakspeare's plays. Would that Ir- 
ving could be there to see." 

An Invisable Respirator.— Mr. Nightingale, a well-known London 
dentist, has devised an ingenious respirator, which is worn without incon- 
venience inside the mouth, compelling the wearer to inspire through the 
nostrils. It is quite invisible. The export agents are the London firm of 
Burgoyne, Burbidges & Co. 

In the village of Harbottle, Northumberland, no child has died du- 
ring the last twenty years ; a farmer and his three shepherds have between 
them forty-seven children, and during the last thirty years not a death 
has occurred in their families. — T)ie Sanitary Record. 



INSURANCE. 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 
HUTCHINSON, MANN & SMITH. 

NO 314 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

AGEXTS FOR TUB 

Franklin Ins. Co Indianapolis, Ind New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas St. Paul F. & M. Ins. Co.. .St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio 1 Atlas Ins. Co Hartford Conn. 

People's InB. Co Newark, N. J. Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

National h. I. Co., U. S. A..Wash*n, D. C.IGirard Ins. Co- Philadelphia, Pa. 

Capital Represented, Twelve M dions. 
POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY aT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON, HANK A SMITH, General Agents, 
Dec. 5. 31-1 California street, San Francisco. 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 
~VTo. 406 California street, next door to Bank of California. 

_l_l Fire Insurance Company. Capital, §300,000. Officers :— J. F. Houghton, 
President ; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President ; Charles R. Story, Secretary. H. H. 
BIGELOW, General Manager. 

Directors.— San Francisco— Geo. H. Howard, F. D. Atherton, H. F. Teschemacher, 
A. B. Grogan, John H. Redington, A. W. Bowman, C. S. Hobbs, B. M. Hartshorne, 
D. Conrad, Wm, H. Moor, George S. Johnson, H. N. Tilden, W. M. Greenwood, S. L. 
Jones, George S. Mann, Cyrus Wilson, W. H. Foster, Jr., Joseph Galloway, W. T. 
Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling. Oregon Branch — P. 'Wasserman, B. Gold- 
smith, L. F. Grover, D. Macleay, C. H. Lewis, Lloyd Brooke, J. A. Crawford, D. M* 
French, J. Lowenberg. Hamilton Boyd, Manager, W. L. Ladd, Treasurer. Marys- 
ville — D. E. Knight. San Diego — A. H. Wilcox. Sacramento Branch — Charles 
Crocker, A. Redington, Mark Hopkins, James Carolan, J. F. Houghton, D. W. Earl, 
Isaac Lohman, Julius Wetzlar ; Julius Wetzlar, Manager ; I. Lohman, Secretary. 
Stockton Branch—H. H. Hewlett, George S. Evans, J. D. Peters, N. M. Orr, W. F. 
McKee, A. W. Simpson, A. T. Hudson, H. M. Fanning ; H. H. Hewlett, Manager ; N. 
M. Orr, Secretary. San Jose Branch— T. Ellard Beans, Josiah Belden, A. Pfister, J. 
S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, N. Hayes, Noah Palmer, B. D. Murphy , J. J. Denny, Man- 
ager ; A. E. Moody, Secretary. Grass Valley — William Watt, Robert Watt. Ns- 
vada— T. W. Sigoumey. Feb. 17. 

FIEE AND MARINE INSURANCE— TTNION IllS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds. —Established in 1861.— Nos. -116 and 
418 California street. Cash capital $750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Fraxcisco— J. Mora Moss, James Otis, Mosses Heller, N. J. T. Dana, M. J. 
O'Connor, W. W. Montague, Daniel Meyer, Adam Grant, Antoine Borel, Charles 
Kohler, Joseph Seller, W. C Ralston, I. Lawrance Pool, A. Weill, N. G. Kittle, Jabez 
H'iwes, Nicholas Luning, John Parrott, Milton S. Latham, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, 
Joseph Brandenstein, Gustave Touchard, G. Brignardello, George C. Hickox, T. Ltm- 
men Meyer, J. H. Baird, T. E. Lindenberger. Sacramento— Edw. Cadwalader, J. F. 
Houghton, L. A. Booth. Makysville — L. Cunnigham, Peter Decker. Portland, O. — 
Henry Failing. New York— J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, James Phelan. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. Oct. 26. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FIKE AND MARINE. 

Clash Assets, Jan. 1st, 1876, 8478,000.— Principal Office, 
j 218 and 220 Sansome street, San Francisco. Officers : — Peter Donahue, Pres- 
sident ; A. J. Bryant, Vice-President ; Charles H. Cushino, Secretary; H. H. Wat- 
son, Marine Surveyor. Board of Directors :— Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. 
O'Sullivan, A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, 
George O. McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. 
Buckley, P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld. 
P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, O. W. Childs, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Scale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

NSW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of Iiife Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. m 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
April 23.] 313 Montgomery street, Nevada Block. 

HAMBURG-MAGDEBURG FIEE INSURANCE CO., OF HAMBURG. 

This Company is now prepared to issne policies against 
Loss or Damage by Fire at current rates. Every risk taken by this Company 
is participated in by three of the largest German Fire Insurance Companies, repre- 
senting an aggregate capital and surplus of over SIXTY -FOUR MILLION MARK, 
equal to SIXTEEN MILLION DOLLARS, U. S. GOLD, thus enabling this Company 
to accept large lines. GUTTE & FRANK, General Agents, 
Sept. 23. 321 Battery street. 



OF BERLIN, 



C 



BERLIN-COLOGNE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 
GERMANY. 
apital, 6.000,000 Reich-Marks, $1, 500,000 U. S. Gold Coin. 

Having been appointed General Agents for the Pacific Coast, we are now pre- 
pared to write Policies at the usual rates. TIDEMAN, HIRSCHFELD & CO., 
Nov. 4. Office : No. 302 Sansome street, under W. F. & Co.'s Bank. 

ESTABLISHED 1821. 

Capital, Gold $10,000,000. 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., OF LOXDO\. 
Dec. 16. Agents : BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 230 California st. 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN 

Subscribed Capital, $15,000, 000 ; Accumulated Funds, up- 
wards of $0,750,000 ; Annual Fire Premiums, less re-insurance, Sl,3S0,OOO. 
Losses promptly paid in United States Gold Coin. W. L. BOOKER, Agent, 

April 13. No. 319 California street, San Francisco. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., OF TORONTO, CANADA. 
/ 1ash Assets, 81,207,483.— London Assurance Corporation, 

\^/ of London, England. Cash Assets, $14,!)93,4tS6. — Issue Policies of Insurance 
against loss by fire, at equitable rates. CROSS &. CO., General Agents, 

Jan. 20. 316 California street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 
Capital 85,000,000.— -Agents: Balfour, Guthrie A Co., No. 



C° 



230 California street, San Francisco. 



No. 18. 



E. D. Edwards. 



E. L. Coaig. J. Craig. 

CRAIG, EDWARDS & CRAIG, 
ttorneys and Counselors at Law. Land Suits and Patent Right 

i Cases a Specialty. No. 210 Montgomery street, San Francisco California. 
[July 29.] 



Feb, in, 1877.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISKK. 



ZARA8 EARRINGa 
[An i 1 1 i. u tiss Ballad.] 

" M\ . «rriags! m> r*v» drop! int.* the wi-11. 

Anil ' 

• (hin * irunntU'* fountain by, -»|»- ik*- Ubuhuw* daughter 
■•The «• it i- deep, for down thi y lie, beneath tli<- oold blue water — 
T«> ma <li'l \l>i< b i giva tli. in, when In- ipeJta In* r*ji.l Farewell 
And what t" iny when ha oomea l-ack, alas! 1 cannot fcalL 

" My i wring* I they were pearli in >ilv<T aet, 

Thai when my Moor wai Far away, 1 peer ihould him fnryet, 

Tluit 1 ne'er t" other tongues ihnuld lift, nor nnile "ii 

Hut remember he my tint had Irlmnd. pare as th< 

\\ hen If cornea back and bean that 1 have dropped them in the well, 

oh what will Muoa think of nu-, I cannot, cannot tell. 

" M\ i urringa! my Barrings! he'll say they should have been. 

ii. 1 of silver! but >>r gold an.! glittering sheen, 
Of jaaperand ol onyx, and of diamond shining clear, 

ii- t.. the chaninng light, with radiance insincere 
That changeful mini unchanging gems are not befitting wall— 
Thus will he think ami what to say, alas! I can nut tell. 

He'll think when 1 to market went. 1 loitered by the way ; 

He'll think :» willing ear I tent t" all the Lads might say : 

H. H think some "'her lover's hand among my tresses noosed, 

From the ears where he had placed them, my rings of pear] unloosed; 

H.'ll think when I e to beside this marble well, 

My |K-;irls fall in -and what t-> say, alas! I cannot tell. 

"■ H.'ll say I am ;i wmn;in, and we are nil the same ; 

He'll say 1 loved when he was here t>> whisper of his flume — 
Hut when he went t<> Tunis my ring in troth had broken, 
Ami thought no more oi Muca, and cared not for his token. 
My earrings! my earrings! ohl luckless, luckless well! 
For what to say to Uuca, alas! I cannot tell. 

"■ I'll tell the truth to Mnea, and I hope he will believe 

That I have thought of him at uiorniny/, ami thought of him at eve ; 

That musing "ii my lover, when down the sun was gone, 

1 n ings in my hand I held, by the fountain all alone : 
And that my mind was o'er the sea, when from ray hand they fell, 
And that deep his love lies in my heart a* they lie in the welL" 

A recent letter from Paris has this to say of the hats worn in the 
Hois de Bolougne:- " Think of anyone of the modest, pretty girls you 
may know, mid fancy her pink-and -white dimpled face in a close cottage- 
shape of downy white beaver, trimmed with crumped pink silk and bor- 
dered with lame, the whole constituting a piece of head-gear that is 
Strapped on with a buckle under the left ear. This is the unconscious, 
unknowing and innocent ' baby' style. The other style is, of course, a 
-t. A glowing brunette darts by in an otter velvet coup de vent, 
which means that the hat-shape is all flying back as if blown in a gale. 
On the top are three full rosettes called cabbages, or cfuiun. They are 
made of pinked ..ut orange silk in three tints. It is a refulgent, flashing 
coronal, which young matrons call sunrise, but as mixed orange is equally 
1h. oming to the elderly who have silver hair, these latter call it sunset. 
Blondes have their novelty likewise. It is a mixture of absinthe-colored 
velvet and pale azure. Absinthe is a murky green with a yellow tinge, 
the shade of dormant ponds that run deep. A very blue-eyed maid 
Bhould try the combination without delay, out if she have already in- 
vested in a linden or white plush she might attempt an absinthe head- 
dress, and select for the purpose grasses of the color above mentioned, in 
which she will entwine sprays of forget-me-nots. It is Ophelian and me- 
di.-v;d -two indispensable qualities for a blonde on the threshold of 
1877. M -Washington Gazeite. 



Deaf and Dumb. — At the Guildford County Bench, recently, 
Lord Middleton in the chair, a man named James \Villiams was brought 
up on a charge of soliciting alms by the presentation of a petition couched 
in the most plaintive terms of charitable appeal. The Superintendent of 
Police said he had reason to believe that the prisoner was simulating to be 
deaf and dumb. . The noble chairman said he was acquainted with the 
deaf and dumb alphabet, a knowledge he had acquired for judicial pur- 
poses, and he would test the prisoner. He then put the question to the 
prisoner by means of the digital alphabet, " What have you to sav to the 
bench ?" The prisoner immediately responded on his fingers, "Nothing, 
but that I wish to be released, as I have committed no offence in law." 
The chairman replied, " Your petition is well written, and as it has not 
been shown that it is otherwise than a statement of facts, you are dis- 
charged." The prisoner, with digital emphasis, responded, You are the 
first magistrate I ever met who could converse with a dumb man, and it 
is to this fact I owe my discharge. I shall ever remember you with grat- 
itude." The translation of the prisoner's answers by the chairman caused 
great laughter in Court. 

It is frequently said that English and French muslins produced by 
machinery, rival in fineness of texture and beauty of finish those woven 
in the East, but this is not true, and the recent introduction of these fab- 
rics into the English market is the consequence of that fact. A native 
woman with her fingers and spindle alone, and a native man with his toes 
and loom alone, will spin a thread and finish a piece of muslin which can- 
not, by the application of the most delicate machinery, be produced out- 
aide of India. There is one quality of Decca muslin, for example, which 
is termed "woven air." It is made only for kings 1 daughters. So short 
is the staple of the raw material, snd so brittle its fibres, that it must be 
spun by a woman under twenty five, and before the dew has left the grass 
in the morning. As a substitute for natural moisture, the evaporation of 
water from a shallow pan is sometimes used, but the quality in that case 
is inferior. And yet the most delicate and finest of fabrics, a piece four 
yards in length by one in width, weighing less than one ounce avoirdupois 
often, is very durable, and will wash. Since the disappearance of many 
of the native rulers of India, this " evening dew," as it is also called, is 
not largely made. 

It is said that no Boston girl is admitted to society until she has 
written at least one poem on the immortality of the soul. 



BANKS. 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK. 

Incorporate*! In GeueTa, Nh Uxor-liuul. January Mttj. IH73. 
Hood §3,000,000, 

.i (OH San I i ■ 
■ h & II.T1..H, 5*7 Clay ati lNCIH BKHToN ami ItOBKKT 

U W T 

Tin, Kmk i- prepared to grant Letteri "f Credit on Kuropa, and to Inuuaol 

Ba nki ng, Hanmnttlo and Exchange Business, and t ffotiato Amsrii 

ouriil In I ui ■!■■ i '■ poalti n . slved 

iiiiih oi KxcIiuhh*' on New York, Philadelphia, London, Urer] I. Parti, 

Lyons, Manellles, Bordeaux, Oloron, Bm ale, Berlin, Hamburg. Frankfort, I 
Lausanne. Chetu de-Fonda, Neuchntel, Ptibourg, Bern re, Baden, Bade, 

Zurtoh, N intcrtlmr. K I iati nausea, St. (fallen, Luoeru, ChUT, B IHI0, l.u- 

geno, Uendrielo, Qohoa. Turin, Milan, Florence, Borne, 

an As-»u.v OflBee m annexed t-> tbc liunk. a -says .if puid, silver, quartz ore* 
and lulphureta Batumi Ln coin or ban, at the option ol the depositor 

Advances made on bullion and ore* Duel and bullion can be forwarded from any 

(Hirt of llio country, and returns made through Wells, Fargo A Go., OT bj oheoka. 
[September 18.1 

m • THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FB A NCI 6 CO 

Capital $5,000,000. 

D.O. MILLS President. | IVM ALVOKD Vlce-l»re*'C. 

THOMAS BKOWN Cashier. 

A0BBT8 : 
New York, Agency <<f the flank of Culfurnia ; hustnii, Tremont National Hank ; 

Chicago, Union National Bank; St. Louis, Boatman'* Saving Hank; New Zealand. 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, china, Japan, India and Australia, the < tiiental 
bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Oold Hill, and Correspondents in ull 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Ualn, Antwerp. 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburg!!. Otpenhngen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel' 
bourne. Sydney. Auckland, Hongko ng. Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4 

THE NEVADA BANK, OF SAN FBANC18C0. 
Paid Vp Capital $10,000,000. 

Louis SfcLaue President. 1 J. fj. Flood.. Vice-President. 

N. It- Masten Cashier. 

Directors : — J. C. Flood. J. W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, Jas. G. Fair, LouisMcLane. 

CoRBKsrosDKSTs: — London -Smith, Payne & Smiths, Paris— HOttlnguer & Co. 
Hamburg— Hesse, Newman & Co. New York—" The Bank ol New Y'ork, N. B. A." 
Chicago-— Merchants' National Bank. Boston— Second National Bank. Now Orleans 
— State Na tional Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to receive deposits on open account, issue certificates of de- 
posit, buy and sell exchange, purchase bullion, and transact a general banking busi- 
ness. Collections made and proceeds remitted at current rates of exchange. Oct. 0. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, K. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, 1). Callaghan ; Cashier, George W. Rodman ; Assistant 
Cashier, \V. Ritchie. 

Directors :— R. C. Wool worth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, James C. Flood, Edward Martin, James Momtt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottingueri Co. New Y'ork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Chii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Dec. IS. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid np, si.siio,- 
000, with power to increase to §10,000,000. Southeast corner California ami S:m- 
somo streets. Head Office — 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoriaand Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bonk of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Banl' of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan -Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank* Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Comj>any of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

Dec. 9. W. H. TILL1NGHAST, Manager. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 

Capital, 95,000,000, of which 83,000,000 ie« fully paid up a* 
present capital. San Francisco Otfice, 424 California; London Office, 22 Old 
Broad street. President, M. S. LATHAM ; Manager, JAMES M. STREETEN ; Assist- 
ant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN. London Bankers, Bank of England and London 
Joint Stock Bank ; New Y r ork Bankers, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston Bankers, 
Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General 
Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said 
cities and all parts of the world. October 23. 

THE ANGLO-CALLFORNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 
4 04) California street, San Francisco.--- London Office, 2 

~xi/^'/^' Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, §6.000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, 

Oct 4. IGN. STEINHART, 



Managers. 



THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital, 85,000,000.— Alvlnza Hayward, President : R. O. 
Sneath, Vice-President ; H. F. Hastings, Cashier ; R. N. Van Brunt, Secretory. 
Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers on all principal Cities. Collections made and a 
general Banking business transacted. August 22. 

SUTRO & CO., 

Bankers and Brokers, 408 Montgomery street.— Highest 
price paid for IT. S. Bonds, County Bonds, Scrip, Currency and Foreign Coin. 
Exchange draw n on N"ew .York. ^ May 20 

MONEY TO LOAN. 

John T. Little, Money Broker and Real Estate Agent, dis- 
counts notes and loans money on all kinds of collaterals in large amounts ; buys 
and sells real estate. OFFICE : 405i CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Dec. 25. Opposite Bank of California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER 



AND 



Feb. 10, 1S77. 



IS THE GOOD DEACON CZAPSKY FITCH A BLACK- 
MAILER? 
That the unctious deacon is a skilled and inveterate blackmailer 
we do not care, in these days of libel suits, to assert. Epithets, however, 
may be left to take care of themselves. It is with the facts we propose 
to concern ourselves. Those supplied, the reader may suit himself in 
applying the name which best befits their character. A roistering, night 
prowling, saloon frequenting, whisky guzzling, pioneer of hoodlum life, 
he is found first coming into prominence, in the halcyon days of stealing, 
as State Printer. The laws of the State had to be printed in English 
and Spanish. Double prices were allowed for the type setting of the Span 
ish matter. That was a fat arrangement to start with, but, as we shall 
see, it was not fat enough for deacon FitcQ. The record shows that tinder 
color of that arrangement, and by virtue of an account most clearly un- 
derstood by an expert, he actually had the effrontery to charge and col- 
lect double prices for the press work also. Of course, everybody knows 
that whether the type be set up in Spanish or English. Irish, Dutch or 
Hindustani, the cost of printing from it is equally the same. Here, 
then, we have the fellow face to face with a transaction which, if not 
blackmaU, what is it? The influence that got him his appointment was 
doubtless also that which secured the payment of his thieving bill. Does 
it not follow that by aid of that influence he blackmailed the State out 
of that large sum which laid the foundation of his two papers, both daily? 
Just look at the transaction ! Notice the nice subtlety of that mind 
which twisted an arrangement for double prices for Spanish type setting 
so as to mean also double prices for printing from it. Truly, the concep- 
tion was great ! It was worthy of a — well, suppose we say — of a Czapsky 
Fitch. So much for that fact! We turn tn another. If the proprietor 
of a paper says in effect, if not in precise words, to a druggist : "Yon 
are the agent for the sale of a deadly drug. It is insidious. The taste for 
it grows upon what it feeds. It will become a fashionable but too terrible 
substitute for whisky. At best it will render a man a body-wrecked, soul- 
destroyed curse to himself and to those around him. It will find its way 
into the boudoirs of the beautiful, the fair, and the frail. Under its stu- 
pefying influences thousands with unsteady hands and blunted senses will 
till their glasses with the potion even unto the level of death. Never- 
theless, this deadly thing I— a censor of other men — I, a guardian of the 
public health and morals — I, Czapsky Fitch, will not only advertise it, 
but will puff it and write editorials recommending it as a heaven-sent cor- 
dial; but mark you well, Mr. Druggist, I must be paid for it, and that in 
no mean fashion ! Every man has his price, and I have mine. I am ready 
to sell my columns and deceive the public for a consideration. I must be 
a partner in the profits. My price must go on increasing in proportion to 
the evil I do. Every suicide by chloral-hydrate must contribute to my 
gains. Every woman who eats out her own life by this damnable com- 
pound, and poisons that of her offspring, must be evidence that a portion 
of the hard earnings of her sorely afflicted husband have passed into the 
coffers of the Bulletin. Every soul that is damned by your brutalizing 
drug must pay me toll whilst on the road to hell or elsewhere. Then, and 
then only, will I do this thing. Those are my terms." The transaction 
by which Pickering & Fitch entered into a partnership to puff chloral- 
hydrate, and so push it — a dangerous thing — into general use. is known to 
the whole city. Fac simiiies of the partnership agreement have been 
published. We ask in what does that agreement in its essence and 
meaning differ from the interpretation of it which we have just put into 
good plain English ? We defy even the indirection of a Pickering, or the 
sophistries of a Fitch to get rid of that inevitable and logical interpreta- 
tion of it. That being so, does it not follow that it was the least of their 
offenses, but nevertheless a grave offense, that they blackmailed the drug- 
gist? If it was proper to advertise bis drug, why not advertise it in the 
ordinary way only, and at the ordinary prices ? Why editorially lie about 
it, and why as a requital become interested in its extensive sale ? As all 
roads lead to Rome, so all logical argument upon this subject points to 
the unmistakable conclusion that this arrangement, in its dire calami- 
t'es and infamous conception, stands alone as the one unrivaled and unsup- 
passable act of perfidy of which a free press has yet heen guilty. So 
much for that Fact. We proceed. The people of this State know how 
Fitch hounded everybody connected with the great railroad. Everj'thing 
that its managers did, as well as everything they left undone, was the 
subject of misrepresentation, abuse and villifi cation. As many as two 
and three leading articles a day were devoted to these purposes for two or 
more years. The insensate hate of Fit&h toward Stanford seemed more 
like a monomania than any feeling one can imagine as being born 
of a rational mind. The railroad king could not, according to Fitch's 
siniiter imaginings, run even a horse race houestly, but must needs "sell 
it." The man who in the pride of his victory made a present of the 
whole of the stakes to his successful rider had at the next occasion sunk 
so low that he sold hit horse, his rider and himself in order to plunder the 
poorer thousands who assembled to witness the sport. But suddenly, as 
if in the twinkling of an eye, all this is reversed. The whole people see, 
and marvel at, the change. Pickering is seen hob-nobbing on the southern 
route, and rejoicing that the second #r competing line across the conti- 
nent is in the good hands of the men who control the first. Two years 
ago, when fares and freights were slightly increased, Fitch day by day 
grew wild over the evils that he declared were to befall the State in conse- 
quence. A greater increase has lately been made, when lo ! the Bulletin 
comes rmt with an article saying in effect that the increase ie a blessing 
in disguise, as it will act as a protection to home industries. Why this 
going back upon itself ? Why this base tersgiversation ? Is it by any 
process of reasoning that Fitch has been led to abandon his principles, and 
to disgracefully forsake the anti-railroad party he was at such pains to 
buildup? "Process of reasoning," indeed ! We are greatly mistaken if 
the "process" were not of a very different kind. In short, has he black- 
mailed the railroad ? Ah ! thereby hangs a tale. The facts of what he 
was, and of what he is, are read and known of all men. An intelligent 
mind will be lost in a labyrinth if it attempts to explain the change upon 
any hypothesis save one. So much for that Fact. More anon. 



It is $ truism that a fault of youth, if repented of and atoned for by a 
pure after life, ought to be allowed to sink into oblivion. But if the wick- 
edness be conntinued from youth to mature manhood, growing from bad to 
worse, surely it i$ not anjiss to point out that as the twig was inclined so 
the tree grew up. 

Trade Dollars are quoted iu this market at 100 buying and 100J selling. 



THE GREAT TOSS-TJF. 

We are weary, so weary, of waiting, 

We really are sitting on thorns ; 
Stop spouting and shouting aud swearing, 

Stop blowing your penny tin -horns, 
And however you "fix up" the question, 

However disgraceful the plan. 
Just give us a Hayes or a Tilden, 

And make all the haste that you can. 
Come, rattle the national dice - box, 

No matter how loaded the dice ; 
When it's plain the thing can't be done fairly, 

It won't do to be over nice ; 
As elections have proved to be farces, 

We'll take any sort of a man ; 
Let the biggest rogue throw " double -sixes," 

But make all the haste that you can 
We won't have a king or a kaiser. 

We're bound to be free as the air; 
No heirship of thrones will we suffer — 

We'll "stiake" for the President's chair; 
This is primitive, simple and easy, 

Yet we bungle sj over the plan 
That really all Europe is laughing, 

So make all the haste that you can. 
It is grand to be quite independent 

Of kings who are monarchs by birth; 
It is fine, sirs, to know we are governed 

By rulers made such for their worth ; 
But settle at once on the copper, 

It's time that the tossing began , 
Well all take a drink with the winner, 

So make all the haste that you can. 

THE COMPROMISE COMMISSION A FAILURE. 

We were never among those who admired the compromise bill. 
Somebody was elected President, and that somebody ought to have been 
found out by honest inquiry, and not by the chance which determined the 
selection of a fifth judge. The Democrats had all the trumps in their 
hands, but seem to have nevertheless lost the odd trick. The Commis- 
sioners have been tried and found wanting. They were to rise above 
party and decide according to the demands of truth, abstract justice, and 
the eternal fitness of things. The Floiida case was before them. It was 
urged on the one hand that they must accept, without question, Governor 
Steam's certificate, false though it admittedly was. On the other hand it 
was contended that if one man, by fraud, could rob the people of their 
choice, there was virtually an end of Republican government, and that if 
the inquiry could not reach the facts of that fraud, then there remained 
no excuse for the existence of the Commission. It was shown that the 
wrong of Governor Stearns has since been passed upon by the duly elected 
Governor of Florida, by the Legislature and by a Republican State 
Supreme Court, and that by all oi these it has been clearly ascertained 
that Tilden has an unmistakable majority. All this was without avail. 
The Commis&ion, in effect, decided that fraud once committed must be 
perpetuated. The vote by which that most extraordinary decision was 
arrived at is the utter condemnation of the Commission. Loud have been 
the protestations that the members would rise above party considerations 
and determine each for himself, under the solemnity of an oath, and 
with all candor and truthfulness, the very grave question that has arisen. 
To the dismay of all who hoped that at last a tribunal had been created 
in which the love of right prevailed over the love of party, it has turned 
out that, though the Commission is outwardly clothed with forms of 
decency, it is inwardly aud at heart as unscrupulously partisan as that 
famed Louisiana Canvassing Board. The P.epiesentatives, Senators and 
Supreme Judges, each and all alike, voted according to their party prede- 
lictions. Accordingly the vote stood eight for the view which is likely to 
elect Hayes, and seven for that which favors Tilden, and so we doubt not 
the vote will stand all through. Though how, in the face of the decision 
already reached, the Oregon difficulty is to be got over we do not clearly 
see. Meanwhile this compromise business is a failure. Compromises 
nearly always are. 

WHEHLER REBUKED BY HIS PEER. 
We have heretofore seen the absurdity of a Wheeler injunction. 
We have witnessed our Supreme Court snubbing the judge who dis- 
charged a prisoner over whom he had no jurisdiction. We have read the 
ironical terms in which the High Court of Appeals of Missouri referred 
to an injunction to restrain the publication of future libels. We have 
seen how Wheeler testified to popular anti-Chinese allegations, he having 
previously expressed, in private, opinions of a directly opposite character. 
This week we find him rebuked by his locum tenens, Judge Wallace. Just 
before Judge Wheeler left for his holiday he granted an ex parte appli- 
cation for a receiver to take possession of the Lady Bryan Mining Com- 
pany. The other side applied to the Country Judge, who temporarily sup- 
plied Wheeler's place, to have that order set aside as illegal and void. 
Judge Wallace expressed his regret that the law allowed him no discre- 
tion in the matter, otherwise he would have avoided reviewing the de- 
cision of the regular Judge of the Court, but he had no option, and so 
proceeded to undo the absurdly illegal acts of Wheeler. How long are 
we to be afflicted with a judge who seems incapable of rendering a de- 
cision, even upon the simplest matter, that will hold water? Put him in 
the next class that applies for admission to' the bar of the Supreme Court, 
and we will bet the News Letter property against his game leg that he will 
fail to pass. In the name of common sense we demand that our judges 
shall at least be lawyers. 

San Francisco Medical Benevolent Society. — An institution ha» 
been granting licenses to practice medicine that has no legal right to do 
so. We refer to the San Francisco Medical Benevolent Society. The 
legal fraternity will be delighted at this phase of affairs, as, in case a pa- 
tient dies that was attended by one of the latter societ}', the important 
question arises as to who can sign a death certificate. It leaves loop-holes 
for much litigation in cases of trials for murder and matters of life insur- 
ance and expert evidence. 



r 



Feb, n». : 



CALIFORNIA \l>\ ERTIS1 R. 



g 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"RtU tb* l*rt»r!" "What lh. d»*tl *M ihottT" 
"On* that will |<Uj lb* .1, ,,i, .it, oil 



There wm roceutly n (.uuily living in Sooth Sun Prancleoo, th« 

■ nf which ttvn never kuown to invito any neighbor to enter 

on the street without 

. ti ntlj . i'ii.1 looked in at fell 

dows, affirm that the inmates kepi - on whan al homo, and in 

.M."r ixtulil any une testify to hat ing wen either father, mother or 

the two ■"■■!.-. and three daughter! ungloved. It Is two years since the 

i *imls cam< there, md as the] helped the exweaunn to put the furniture 

int" th. i by laughed al the circumstance of the 

II wearing thick brown cloth gloves. Little by lit.il- 
cnrioeil s tiding the exclusive ami perpetually gloved 

ut, tike all mysteries, the interest soon died out, ami i 
i makti remarks on a subject which had long grown stale. At 
Mr. tJulightly (the head of the family in question) was compelled 
ring medical man to I sirl, who was sick. 

In feelii iked permission to take her glove otE, alle rin 

that the I by it prevented him from Judging accurately of the 

Lion of her blood. The request was refused; and Dr. 3. 
then noticed that alt the other members of the family wore gloves. Fever 
let in, and the sick young lady became delirious. During one of the 

visits, while he was Feeling her pulse, the girl struggled 
lenUy that one of her gloves fell >'tf and disclosed a tons thin band, with 
a bunch of toft hair growing right in the palm. Befbn '■ iving the house 
the other members of the family threatened the doctor severely if he ever 
(very, the sons especially being very hot in their 
menaces, Di 5. ul necessary promises, but prior to his departure 

persuaded thi other members of t he family t.. show turn their hands also. 
Tin- hair was visible in all. It was very wft and covered the entire palm, 
being thickest on the outside and scanty in the centre. When the Dr. 
called the next day, the family hail moved and left no trace of their 
a note enclosing bun $30 for his professional Bervioes, 

N ie knows where they have migrated to, ami it may be perhaps for 

the best to leave them undieturbea in the possession of a secret about 
which they are evidently very sensitive, 
A well known newspaper reporter lately came into possession of a 
I piece, It matters little where he got it ->r how, but he had it. 
Twaa his, and pern ips had been slave to thousands, and he took it into a 
broker's office to change it into silver. The clerk, knowing his customer 
■ iporter, merely shook his head, and remarking that he did not care 
into trouble, declined to change it. The saddened journalist 
thought of bis restaurant, where he owed six dollars, and tendered the 
double eagle to the proprietor in payment of his bill. To his surprise the 
man of mutton shook his head and pushed the gold piece hack, with an 
observation about its being unnecessary for him to liquidate his indebted- 
1'hen lie got mad and tendered it to a barkeeper for a drink, and 
the whisky dispensei sighed and shoved it back at him with a look of 
pity. Finally he sought out a friend, and begged him to convert the ob- 
noxious cart-wheel into silver and to keep the discount. The friend 
shook his head doubtfully, but slowly cashed the money, and as he leaned 
over the counter lie whispered: "Say. old man, I don't want to ask any 
questions, only it is evident you have money, and it is also known that 
you write for a daily paper. If you have been accepting any bribes from 
tors, or doiug anything crooked, don't let on that you changed 
your gold here, because 1 might have to make it good. I hope you have 
not shown it to any one, because public confidence is a little shaken just 
now, and your being seen with £20 would not strengthen it." The reporter 
hong his hi ad, took up his money, and went home, feeling, poor fellow! 
that newspaper-writers with money in their pockets were just objects of 
suspicion. Then he wrote a note to his employer, and asked him to pay 
his salary for the future in dimes, so that he might regain his character 
for honesty as time rolls on. 3 

A capital actor, an indefatigable scientist and entomologist, and a 
ruter in Bohemia— such is Harry Edwards. Therefore, his tortures may 
be conceived when it is stated that at a recent performance of Julius 

( 'asar he saw a beautiful specimen Of a very rave beetle flying round the 
in perfect freedom, and no pin through it. The audience could not 
unite make out why "Caesar" kept looking about as if his neck was com- 
ing off, and were somewhat surprised to hear him say to " Antony," 
" Forget not, in your speed, Ahtonrns,tO catch that melolonthian, I mean 
to touch Calphurnia," and they were more puzzled to observe a huge but- 
terfly-net making frantic sweeps at something in the wings whenever 
11 Caesar" was off the Stage. In the second scene, " Antony" remarked 
to " Caesar" that " Cassius" was " a noble Roman and well given," and he 
was sta^ei-e.l to hear " I 'a-sur" reply, " Would he were fatter. By Jove, 
it's a BrachinuB crepitans," The audience smiled at their old favorite, 
but seemed puzzled as " Ciesar" jumped three feet into the air, ami evi- 
dently missed some object lie was trying to grab. As the curtain fell 
after the first act, a gentleman in the stage box heard Mr. Edwards 1 voice 
yelling behind the curtain, " I know it's either an efophorvn or a sphoerid- 
turn, and I'm bound to have it." The supers were astonished to see 
" Julius Csesar," with a gauze net five feet deep, rushing up the ladders 
into the flies, and they marveled more to notice the depressed appearance 
of the Vice-President of the Academy of Sciences as he came down 
again. Bishop will do these sort of things, and hi had stolen a valuable 
beetle from Mr. Edwards' collection, fastened it to invisible pieces of 
horsehair, and hid himself in the flies, just where he could dangle the 
specimen in front of " CiBsar's" nose. 

Senator Simon Cameron is the latest distinguished defendant in a 
breach-of -promise case. The playful young deceiver is only about 77 years 
old, aud if he has made any rash promises to the plaintiff, Mrs. Mary H. 
Oliver, the jury will doubtless excuse him on the score of his youth. 
However, it should be a warning to the Hon. Senator, and as he grows 
older he will doubtless be more cautious in offering his hand and heart to 
coy, virgin triflers with men's affections. It is true that the Senator is 
somewhat young to marry, and if he sets up the plea of inexperience 
combined with a hot-blooded temperament, his peers will probably con- 
done the breach of his unfulfilled vows. In years to come the T. C. hopes 
to see young Simon settle down in the quiet and happy matrimonial state, 
but at present, unless he is sure that he has sown all his wild oats, he 
ought not to dream of any such foolishness. 



An interesting trial oi .. at ■ well known 

r with 

rare that h old eat lOOyarus mure inacearunf than 

the latter gentleman. were drawn up, and 

decided that tl dd each contain thirty flvi j u I . oi 10 

of the b I vortheirplal 

i -ni\ kind ol lauoa they pi ofi rred. M 

in ; his opponent two hundred and four- 
ids behind. Here be pauseo and walked up and down the room 
until be was informed that signor Bevere was only fifty yards behind 
him, whereupon he sat down and commenced his second mil 

tie had consumed over i<h» yards, and was going well within him- 
self , wh lew re was observed to be in distress. Hi 

button ■ and undid bis shlrl collar, but be was man- 
ifestly out of condition and unable t<> continue The struggle 

IW virtually over, though Mr. S] 010 :.iinlu tOOll another Spin of a 

quarter of a mile merely to show how game he was, afb t which the 
stakes were handed over to him. It is reiwrted that the champion mac- 
oaroni eater ol Milan is now on his way bare, and it is thought that he 

will meet in Mr. S. a foe Worthy of his steel, should a mateh be made. 
News ConiSS from Kngland that the Visiting Justices of the Surrey 

County Jail have, with a liberality and a delicate compassion for | r 

ii in the United States, ordered a new gallows with 
' all modern conveniences and the latest improvements." This unobtru- 
sive and quiet forethought on the part of the Justices is well worthy of 

imitation mi tliis side of the water. The latest improved gallows haf a 

hand-organ concealed under the woodwork, which plays the " Rogue's 
March and other pieces of soothing music to the condemned, and is so 
regulated that, just as the tune changes to a breakdown, the platform 
sympathizes an I there is n breakdown all round. A circular iron bolt, 
weighing MX) pounds, with a hole in the center, which is suspended close 
to the beam by a thread, now falls down the tightened rope on to the 

neck of the condemned and instantaneously puts an end to Ins sufferings. 

The Bad duty being completed, the organ immediately commences play- 
ing, "Tommy, make room for your uncle," to keep the spirits of the 
Sheriff up, changing the melody to " Now I lay me down to rest,'' as the 
deceased is put in his coffin and carried away. This new and unproved 
gallows deprives an execution of half its unpleasant features, and several 
gentlemen who have been hung on it have given very flattering testimo- 
nials as to its efficacy and the pleasant mode of its operation. 

The latest English swindle consists in a wine merchant sending out 
cases of champagne to clergymen and others just before Christmas with- 
out any clue to the identity of the donor. The parson supposes that it 
is a present from a charitable parishioner, drinks the wine with his 
friends, aud gets a letter three weeks afterward from the merchant an- 
nouncing that the wine was forwarded in the hope of its moderate price 
being an inducement to purchase. "A careless clerk omitted to send 

an explanatory letter with the hamper and Mr. will please 

either return it or remit so many dollars." There is no liquor mer- 
chant in the United States so insensate as to try this dodge on an Amer- 
ican community because there is no American so utterly devoid of sense 
as to refuse the wine or accept the bill for it. If any dealer doubts it let 
hiiu send a few cases out on this plan, including one to this office, and 
see whether he ever gets his wine back or his money either. 

A story is going the rounds about a quiet gentlemen who was relating 
his war experiences, at the Palace Hotel, in company with a number of 
ex-generals, colonels and majors. He had evidently seen gTeat service, 
but when asked his rank replied that he had only been a private. Tlie 
next day the quiet man, as he was about to depart, asked for his bill. 
" Not a cent, sir, not a cent," answered Mr. Leland. You are the very 
first private I ever met." The curious part of the history is 3*et to comet 
All the shoddy majors and colonels round town have, without exception, 
dropped their titles ; there are none to be found in the clubs, and Mr. 
Leland is daily in receipt of piles of affidavits from gentlemen who would 
like to live at the Palace free of charge, on the ground that they never 
were promoted from the rank and file. 

The new Ulster overcoats reach right down to the ground, and are 
very fashionable in the Eastern States. They are expensive when re- 
garded as an original outlay, but very economical as a saving in other 
branches of clothing. It is not at all necessary for a gentleman who pos- 
sesses one to wear any other garment except a hat and a pair of boots. 
Those made with a train are not so advantageous in respect of economy, 
as they draggle in the mud, and the wearer is liable at any moment to 
hold up his skirts too high, and expose the fact that he has no pants on. 
An additional charm about this overcoat is that there is no necessity for 
the occupant to undress at night. The Ulster makes a splendid night- 
gown, and the wearer is saved the trouble of making his toilet, while he 
is clad in the bight of fashion. 

A colored family on Hyde street hangs out the following sign : "All 
kinds of false work done." After a long struggle with his conscience, the 
T. C. concluded to call there and see if he could make arrangements to 
have one or two of his enemies privately assassinated on moderate terms, 
or, failing that, to get some of Mr. Pickering's- chloral-hydrate adminis- 
tered to them. On explaining his errand to an aged African female, he 
was at once convinced how greatly he had misunderstood the meaning of 
the sign. The lady in question explained tlutt it referred solely to the 
manufacture of chignons, puffs, cm-Is and false hair generally, but she 
received so many cash offers from gentlemen who supposed she kept a 
private slaughter-house that she seriously contemplated going into the 
business. 

"I want to descend to the ground floor," said an irascible old 

fentleman standing near the elevator on the sixth story of the Palace 
lotel. "Get right in,'' replied the clerk, " this is the elevator." And 
then the old gentleman, who bad just come from the mountains and had 
never seen a big hotel before, swore at the boy and threatened to report 
him, and asked him how he dared make fun. of him and offer him the use 
of an elevator when he was six stories up and wanted to descend. 

The Rev. Mr. Loomis advertises for sale "trees, scions and seeds" 
of the " fruit of the gods." In a Christian land it is very sad in this ad- 
vanced age to see a Christian minister offering for sale such pagan goods 
as "fruit of the gods." It is bad enough to have Dr. Schliemann rifling 
Agamemnon's pockets at Mycenae, but it is worse for a clergyman to 
hawk the idolatrous diet of an exploded set of deities. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



A TURNED-DOWN PAGE. 

There's a turned-down page, as some writer says, 

In every human life — 
A hidden story of happier days 

Of peace amid the strife. 
A folded leaf that the world knows not — 

A love-dream rudely crushed: 
The sight of a foe that is not forgot, 

Altho' the voice be hushed. 
The far-distant sounds of a harp's soft strings, 

An echo on the air ; 
The hidden page may be full of such things, 

Of things that once were fair. 
There is a hidden page in each life, and mine 

A story might unfold ; 
But the end was sad of the dream divine — 

It better rests untold. 



THE CONFERENCE. 

The proceedings of the Conference at Con- 
stantinople are still but very imperfectly known 
to us, aud all that we learn is from telegrams 
which must be incomplete, and which may be 
more or less erroneous. Still, some points seem 
to come out clearly. 

first, as we said last week, Kussia clearly does 
not wish to go to war alone with Turkey if she 
can avoid it. Some months ago she was ap- 
parently quite ready to do so, but now, somehow 
or other, she is not ready. Secondly, Prince 
Bismarck seems to have spoken, though exactly 
what he has said we do not know. But — this 
much seems certain — he has intimated that he 
thought " concessions enough " had been granted 
to the Turks, and that if they would not agree 
to what has been proposed to them, the Confer- 
ence had better break up, even without arriving 
at any result 

Probably the second of these facts is, at least 
in some degree, the explanation of the tirst. 
This sudden activity of Prince Bismarck is most 
likely the reason why Russia hangs back. Last 
week there seemed likely to be peace, because 
Russia and Turkey seemed to be likely to 
agree on something more or less good, and no one 
else was likely to interfere. But now Prince 
Bismarck has interfered, and the whole prospect 
of the future is again postponed and embroiled. 
Possibly, Prince Bismarck may have good mo- 
tives both for his long delay and for this sudden 
action; but he has certainly given strong argu- 
ments to those who impute bad motives to him. 
They say that he would wish to see Russia- 
weakened, because she may threaten Germany 
from the East, and may be the ally of France in 
the next great war which German statesmen are 
always thinking of. What would weaken Rus- 
sia, they say, is a war ; and, therefore, it is a 
war which Prince Bismarck wishes for Russia — 
any war, so long as it is not with Germany. For 
this purpose, they contend, he has till now prac- 
tically encouraged Turkey ; he staid quiet at 
Varzin when every other statesman was active ; 
he said that he would not spend the blood of a 
single Pomeranian soldier in coercing Turkey ; 
he never made any proposals for her reform when 
proposals from him would have been as effectual 
almost as commands ; he said only that he would 
act with Austria if possible, though Austria was 
certainly not likely to propose anything excess- 
ively stringent : till now the German representa- 
tive at the Conference is believed to have acted 
quibe as much witJa Turkey as against her. But 
now Prince Bismark turns round and says some- 
thing 'real,' must be done. And this change 
is certainly at the very moment when, but for it, 
peace was imminent. Prince Bismarck cannot, 
therefore, wonder that his enemies allege that he 
was quiet as long as quiet promoted war, and 
that he only began to act when, if he had re- 
mained quiet, there would have bCen peace. 

What has been done and said at the Confer- 
ence is, however, as yet too little known for crit- 
icism in detail, and we shall probably have many 
opportunities of writing on them after they are 
fully known. Bat two things seem to be dis- 
tinct: First— that if Russia and Turkey neither 
wish to go to war, Prince Bismarek will hardly 
be able to make them unless we help him. He 
has said he will not send a smgle German soldier 
to help either party ; and unless he ean get us to 
meddle where he will not, there will be peace. 
Secondly — that we onght to he very watchful of 
any apparently philanthropic considerations 
which would lead us to interfere in the matter. 
We may wish to reform "Bulgaria," .and may 
elaborate long schemes for so doing. But, in 
case of need, we cannot get at Bulgaria to carry 
them out. Tbe real upshot of the matter lies 
with the great military Empires who are near, 
and the events of this week are a warning, if a 
warning were needed, how difficult it is to pene. 
trate their motives, and how different they may 
be from ours. — From the Economist, January 13. 



THE SEA SERPENT AGAIN. 
At the Liverpool Police-court on the 9th 
ult. Captain George Drevar, of the bark Pauline, 
appeared before Mr. Raffles, the stipendiary 
magistrate, and asked that his worship would 
receive an affidavit signed by himself, his officers, 
and half of his crew as to their having seen the 
great sea serpent. He said his vessel had just 
arrived in the Mersey from Akyak after a voy- 
age occupying altogether twenty mouths. They 
had sighted the great sea serpent on three diff- 
erent occasions, and it had evidently followed 
the ship, which, owing to a broad white streak 
around it, might have been taken for another of 
its kind. Each time they saw the monster it 
was sporting itself by catching and crushing 
whales in its coils. The captain went on to state 
that he had been invited by several scientific so- 
cieties in London to relate to them what he had 
seen of the mysterious and, as hitherto supposed, 
fabulous creature, and he intended to proceed to 
London in a few days for that purpose. The af- 
fidavit was as follows: "We the undersigned, 
captain, officers, and crew of the bark Pauline, 
of London, do solemnly and sincerely declare 
that on July 8th, 1875, in lat. 5.13 S., long. 35 
W., we observed three large sperm whales, and 
one of them was gripped around the body with 
two turns of what appeared to be a huge ser- 
pent The head and tail appeared to have a 
length beyond the coils of about thirty feet and 
its girth eight or nine feet. The serpent whirled 
its victim round and round for about fifteen min- 
utes, and then dragged the whale to the bottom 
head first. Again, on the 13th of July, a simi- 
lar serpent was seen about 200 yards off, shoot- 
ing itself along the surface, head and neck being 
out of the water several feet. This was seen 
only by the captain and an ordinary seaman, 
George Drevat. A few moments afterwards it 
was seen elevated some sixty feet perpendicular- 
ly in the air." The affidavit- declaration conclu- 
ded in the ordinary legal form. 

If tQe promise contained in the following 
advertisement cut from the Irish Times is per- 
formed, the linguistic powers of Balaam's ass 
will cease to be marvelous: "To be sold, six 
cows. — No. 1. A beautiful cow, calved eight 
days, with splendid calf at foot ; a good milker. 
No. 2. A cow to calve in about fourteen days, 
and great promise. The other two cows are 
calved about twenty-one days, and will spmk for 
themselves. For particulars, apply at 15 Upper 
Buckingham -street for four days." 



M. de Gamond, the originator of the Chan- 
nel Tunnel, is among the list of recorded deaths 
of representatives of Art and Science who passed 
away last year. 



G. P. R. R. 



Commencing Thursday, Feb. 1st, 1877, and until 
further notice, Trains and Boats will Leave 
San Francisco: 
(Overland Ticket Office, at Ferry Landing, foot uf 
Market Street.) 



Street Wharf) — Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stage connection for Sonoma, Calistoga, Wood- 
land, Williams, Knight's Lauding and Sacramento. 

(Sundays excepted) for Woodland, Williams and 
Knight's Landing. (Arrive 8:10 p.m.) 



8f\f\ A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
• VJU land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding and Portland(0.), Colfax, Reno, Ogden and Oma- 
ha. Connects at Gait with train arriving at lone at 
3:40 p.m. (Arrive 5:35 P.M.) 



3f\f\ P-M. (daily)San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• VHJ land Ferry), stopping at all Way Stations. Ar- 
(Arrive 9:35 a.m.) 



Ferry), stopping 
rives at San Jose at 5:30 p.m. 



4f|A P.M. (daily) Express Train (via Oakland Ferry), 
• \J\J fc>r Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall, San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara, 
"Los Angeles," Wilmington, Anaheim, San Diego, Col- 
ton and Indian Wells (Arizona Staye Connection). Con- 
nects at Niles with train arriving at San Jose at 6:55 
P.M. " Sleeping Cars " between Oakland and Los Ange- 
les. (Arrive 12:40 p.m.) 



4f\f\ P. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market St. 
• W Wharf), connecting with trains for Calistoga, 
Woodland, Williams, aud Sacramento; and at Sacramen- 
to with Passenger Train, leaving at 9:15 p. it. for 
Truckee, Reno, Carson and Virginia City. " Sleeping 
Cars " between Vallejo and Carson. 
(Sundays excepted) for Napa and Calistoga. 
(Arrive 11:10 a.m.) 



4f\f\ P.M. (Sundavs excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
.\J\J (from Market St. Wharf), for Benicia and Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking the third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sac- 
ramento at 9:00 a.m., daily. (Arrive 8:00 p.m.) 



A. *-\(\ P -M. (daily), Throngh Third Class and Freight 
"tt:»0\/ Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, arriving at 
Los Angeles on second day at 11:15 A.M. 

(Arrive 7:30 a.m. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS. 



From "SAN FRANCISCO." 




fc 


O 






a 


TO 
OAKLAND. 


So 

9 
o 
>■ 




g z 

Cfl8> 


GO 


So" 
IT 
PJ 
."5 




/A 7.00 


p 3.30 


A 7.00 


A 7.30 


A 8.00 


A 8.00 


A 7.30 




7.30 


4.00 


8.00 


8.30 


t9.3C 


t9. 30 


11.00 




8.00 


4.30 


9.00 


9 30 


Ptl.OC 


p 3.00 


4.00 




S3C 


5.00 


10.00 


p 1.00 


3 0C 


4.O0 


5.00 




9.00 


530 


12.00 


3.30 


4.0C 


ts.io 


6.00 


J 


9.3C 


0.00 


p 2.00 


4.30 


ts.ic 


= i 
M 




< 

a 


10.00 
11.00 


6.30 
7.00 


400 
5.00 


5.30 

6.30 




&*? 




12. 0C 


8.10 


6.00 


7.00 










p 1.0C 


9.20 




8.10 a S • 


c -wis 




2.00 


10.30 




9.20 


bciJ^ 




2 ° = 










10.30 


its 

a t rt 

— SO 















g.2 /a o.io 


p»3.0o'a 6.10 


A 8.30 


■gSJ P11.45 




•7.00 11.00 


o 


m 9 










^8. 10 p 11.45 
*11.45 




s'1 




Cfl U 














g,^ (A10.30 
•S - - 11.30 
x o ( pl2.30 


P 1.30 


a11.0oIa1O.30 
P 1.301 11.30 
*10.30|pl2.30 


















p 1.30 


To FERNSIDE— except Sundays— 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 A.M., 


and 5 p. m. 


To "SAN FRANCISCO." 


bd 

K 

»_ 

BO 

t.2: 

R 

v* ■ 


> 


g„ 




o 


FROM 


o 
> 


Cfl " 


He. 


s 


OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 


(i. 7.30 


A 7.00 


Ate. 45 


At7.08 


A 6.40 


A 0.50 


p 4.20 




10.30 


S.03 


7.55 


8.151 7.40 


7.20 


4.50 




p 4.00 


9.00 


11.15 


11.35 


8.40 


7.50 


5.20 




5.0" 


P 3.00 


til. 45 


PH208 


9.40 


8.25 


5.50 




6.0° 


4.00 


P 3.40J 4.03 


10.40 


8.50 6.30 


5. 




5.00 


t4.45 


p 12.40 9.20 


6.50 


2 


6.031 1. 


2.40 


9.50 


8.00 


o 




•10.00 1 IS . 
OS'S 


4.40 


10.50 


9.10 






g,3 a 


6.40 


p 12.50 






§■3 " 




gel 














£ o 


9.00 


3.20 














3.50 












-■a ( 


FROM ALAMEDA. 








g'| 1 A 5.40 
■g %-\ 8.30 




A 5.10 
5.50 




A 5.20 
6.00 


A*5.00 


PH220 


p'3.20 








1.30 


•7.20 
*8.30 






p 1.50 


M " \, »10.20 






& ( 


FROM ALAMEDA. 












All.40 
p 1.25 


A10.20IP 1.20 
11.20 1.35 


ill 


12.00 


Al0.00|All.0J|P 12.00 


J°(f 1.30 


1 1 1-00 




p 12.201 



From FERNSIDE-Sundays excepted-6.55, 8.00, 1L05 

A. M., and 6.05 p. M. 

♦Change Cars at " Broadway," Oakland. 

a— Morning, p— Afternoon. 
T. H: GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

NORTHERN DIVISION . 

Commencing; Nov. 6th, 1S7«, Passenger 
Trains will leave San Francisco from Passenger De- 
pot on Townsend street as follows: 



8 0A a.m (daily) for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Tres 
•Ov Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all Way 
Stations. fe^T" At Pajaro connects with the Santa 
Cruz Railroad forApros and Santa Cruz. At Salinas 
connects with the M. & S. V. R. R. for Monterey. Stage 
connections made with thistrain. 



nOr a M. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Sta- 
•AO tions. 

3 0K r-M- daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
• ***J Gilroy and Way Stations. 



; Afi P-M- (daily) for San Jose and Way Stations. 



6.30 



p.m. (daily) for San Mateo and Way Stations. 



SOUTHERN DIVISION. 

f^~ Passengers for points on the Southern Division 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton and Indian Wells. 
A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 
J. L. Willcctt, Gen'l Passenger and Ticket Agent. 
[November 18.] 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S S'EEL PENS. 

Soltl by all Stationers throughout the 
World. Sole Agent for the United States : MR. 
HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 1C. 



H. H. MOORE. 

Dealer in Books for Librarles.—A large 
assortment of fine and rare books just received, 
ano for sale at- 'iog Montgomery street, near Merchant, 
San Francisco Oct. 24. 



1-Vb. 10, 1S7T. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



NOTABILIA. 



J. B. FordA Co *s Affairs. --X>:u York, Jan. 90. Thssaeond bank- 
ruptcy of .1 : . which was imnuni terday, 
»1 form for ■ > nvttlrro«nta of the Brat, 
.rt.lit.T who bail rvfUM'tl to ackliowla 
ent on tin? _i.'Mii'i that he had not been "uotified.* 1 This 
is taken by i tion of the principal creditors, and meets the 
nee "I nil, with the one exception named. The "30 0BDtB M 
in nut ui-'ii the composition Amount, lmt upon the unpaid propor> 
inal debt in short, it i> tin- carrying "<it of the 
original ,. which lias already been reduced from >* 1 10,000 to 
iMKt « .-lit in_'. nt cliiini if imt against the firm, (ml 
lividual memben ol it, who, with wren othsr parties, are. sned m 
trustees of the Christian Union Polishing Co, for ipristin 
made in England and rejecting it as not aooording tooontmct The cred- 
■ .I resolutions to the effect that the business shall continue 
without interruption. 

Success in business is never attained by keeping a lot of goods on 
the shelves until thej are old fashioned. Tne active business principle 
of the nineteenth century seems to be to constantly and quickly turn over 
stock into money, and back again into fresh stink. Even though the 
profits nail; yet they are constant, and the public gets the 

benefit of thi Chis is the plan adopted by J. J. O'Brien 4 Co., 

of the Arcade House, BSH to 928 Market street. From morning to nighl 
the busy clerks wait on the oei seless line of customers, and there was 
never ;* run on a bank in ■ time of panic where as mam people attended 
n out their money, as may be seen daily depositing their coin in ex- 
change for the beautiful goods of the Arcade House. 

A mother ami her daughter recently married brothers in Tuscaloosa, 
Ala., and the mother got the younger husband. 

Many men j.'ivo up housekeeping ami go boarding on poor hash 
and worse ->--ip. becau ■ ■ iK- > -et tired of home cookery, and dissatisfied 
with it. Tney little knew that it was a bad stove which caused all the 
trouble. Any one who ever purchased a Union Range of Mr. De la 
Montanya, on Jackson at., below Battery, will tell you how much actual 
health and domestic comfort are derived from the possession of this non- 
i ■.■. K i n< my in Fuel, and perfection of baking, broiling, and 
roasting, are among its merits, fall and examine de la Montanya's va- 
ried and extensive st ock. 

A great deal has been written about sisterly love, but you just find 
a sister who will give up a rocking-chair and a new dime novel to the best 
brother in the world, unless he promises to take her out to lunch next 
.lay. The most comfortable restaurant to take your sister to, is Swain's 
Bakery, on Sutter st., above Kearny. It is quiet and high-toned, the 
■■.. is excellent, and the company select. Besides, their ice cream, 
cakes, and confectionery, are superb, and not to be excelled anywhere. 

Disturbing the Grave— Making a sober man laugh. 

It is a queer country that allows Dr. Schlieraann to go about break- 
ing 'pen the tombs of respectable old people like Agamemnon, although 
the doctor's researches have been very useful. He has sent all the de- 
signs "f the old Grecian furniture which he found to N. P. Cole & Co., 
220 to 22b" Bush St., who are utilizing them largely in their new styles. 
The enterprise of this firm is illimitable. 

''Jemima Susan, did you get my letter?" "Yes, Dick." " I sent 
it in the hopes of raising a flame." " Dick, you succeeded, for it lit the 
Ran." The best gas fixtures in San Francisco are imported and made by 
Bush ft Milne, under the Grand Hotel, on Xew Montgomery street. This 
firm is also agent for the new, patent, silicated Carbon Flter, which ren- 
ders all water, however foul, sparkling, wholesome, and agreeable. 

A Clerical Error— A parson's entry into politics. 



It is said chat George Washington shaved himself, and it is sublime 
to think of the father of his country in shirt sleeves, with a towel on his 
arm, tearing about the house for a piece of paper. George's hand was 
very steady with a razor, because he never drank anything stronger than 
pure Gerke Wine. I. Landsberger, 10 and 12 Jones Alley, is sole agent. 

What a bad man gets unlawfully in this world is as nothing to what 
he will get in the next. Even bad men have some redeeming quality, 
and the best way for them to have it brought out is to be photographed 
at Bradley & Rulofsons'. Their pictures are incomparably beautiful, and 
will often show a bad man his true features while there is time to amend. 



Planets govern not the soul nor guide the destinies of man, but trifles 
lighter than straw are powers in the building up of character. The char- 
acter of " Old Cutter" whisky needs no building up. It is the purest 
and finest spirit in the market, and it is sold only by A. P. Hotaling, 429 
and 431 Jackson street. 

Where to Find Eternal Spring— In the circus business. 

VvTienever a lot of men undertake to crowd women out of a legiti- 
mate calling they make St. Paul responsible for it. Woman's most legiti- 
mate calling is piano-playing, and the best piano in the world is the Hal- 
let & Davis. Badger, 13 Sansome street, is agent. 

The printer cannot entirely compose himself, although he is able to 
get a little set up. In such a condition the best thing he can do is to 
dump a bottle of Napa Soda into his galley. It is the coolest and most 
refreshing mineral water made. 

An apple "woman says her business is at a stand still. Muller's busi- 
ness is carried on at the same old stand on Montgomery st., where he 
sells the best spectacles and optical goods in the city. 



Dr. E. de F. Curtis. M. D. ( etc., may be consult d at 

■ Suttei street betw I daily, 

bum 10 a. \i. to 3 P. m. and from to 8 P. ».: i 11 to 3 

only. Dr. Curtis is licensed to pi ine under the oe* MedJ 

on] Act; his publics! [ned from A. I.. Bancroft 

eoi the Pacific coast, or from the author, Dr. Curti 
Sutter street, S. I". 

The Turks claim to be better loldlen than the Russians, bnosnae they 
do n't drink brandy. Perba] family 

to defend. If the Turka could only/get such bian.lv, and other liquors, 
as are kept by K. ft. P. J. < they would fight n* 

tin. 



VERDICT ALWAYS FOR THE DAVIS' VEBTICU, FEED SEW1NO 
MACHINE. 

The 4Viitrinih*l 4>ol<l Mcilal mid Diploma. 1H76: the s...i( 
Uedal, 1876 . the Franklin Institute Medal, 1874, Tho Ebopon oi theOenU an si 

C mission aajs : "The DAVIS is awarded the Grand Qold Medal ol Bon< 

Diploma ol Merit for excellent material and construction, idapted to tne greatest 
range ol work." We claim Bales unprecedented, and satisfaction universal. In its 
construction ii differs from all others, and Is equaled by nous As an earnest ft what 
i- here i Isimed, the Manufacturers uhallenge all others for s frtondiy contest, either 
for amusement or a more substantia] consideration. The Family Machine i> light 
running and i isllj comprehended; basati ingenious 'lev ice " !■■ take up" lost motion 
or wear, which, to a machinist, is positive proof of durability, We are ploased to 
refer to nmeliiiieH in manufacturing establishments lure, where thej have been In 
constant use for nearly three years, t" veriTj the above. Has reo Ived more medals 
and complimentary testunordale than any other In the same length <>f time. Haau- 
Eocturcrsars especially Invited to examine our No I t ]nstoul Agents wanted in 
nil unoccupied territory, MARK SHELDON, Qen'l Agent for the Pacific Coast, 
Dec. 23. No. 180 Post street . 

A. S. HALL1D E, 

Importer, Dealer nml Manufacturer of Wire Goods, Wire 
hope, Win.- Si'iven.s, Ir-m and I'.rcus Batten Cloth, etc. Wire Screens for win- 
dows and doors, and all Kinds ol Wire Wort on hand and made to order. Bule Agent 
for Torrey'B Weather Strips, to exclude dust and rain, and Holloway's Fire Extin- 
guisher. Proprietor of the Patent Endless Ropeway. Experienced workmen always 
on hand to fit up orders. California Wire Works.: CALIFORNIA ST. Dec. E8. 



F. C Snow] SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLEEY. [W. B. Mat. 

SNOW A MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pictures, Frames, Moldings, and Artists' materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



OPENING OF RARE AND ELEGANT BOOKS! 

Hit . Moore takes pleasure in announcing: that bn \ lug re- 
turned from his annual purchasing trip to the great Eastern and European 
Literarj Depositories, that lie has received and now has open the largest assortment 
of ANTIQUE and MODERN LITERATURE ever before brought to this city, con- 
sisting of many old and rare books, and other novelties in literature. No one can 
fail to find the most acceptable HOLIDAY PRESENT for either old or young, male or 
female, amongst our varied stock. Gift Books in Great Variety. Call and examine 
our stoc k . [Dec. 16.] II, H. MOURE, Gftl Montgomery street ._ 

AN EXTRAORDINARY RAZOR 

Has been Invented by the Queen's Own Company of En- 
gland, the edge and body of which is so thin and flexible as never to require 
grinding, and hardly ever setting. It glides over the face like a piece of velvet, 
making shaving quite a luxury. It is creating a great excitement in Europe among 
the experts, who pronounce it PERFECTION. $2 for buffalo handles, S3 for ivory ; 
by mail, 10 cents extra. The trade supplied on libera] terms by the sole agents in the 
United States. NATHAN JOSEPH &, 00., 
September 2. No. 641 Clay street, S. F. 

TO OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE! 

Persons Owning Real Estate tbat bas heretofore been as- 
sessed in the former owner's name, are requested to appear personally, or send 
their deeds to the Assessor's Office, 614 Merchant street. City Hall, immediately, and 
ha\ e the proper changes made for next year's Roll. The work on the Real Estate 
Roll for IS77 will commence in a few days, after which it will be too late for anv 
Changes. ALEXANDER BADLAM, 

Jan. 13. City and County Assessor. 

LEA AND PERRINS* SAUCE. 

In consequence of sparlous imitations of WORCESTER- 
SHIRE SAFCE, which are calculated to deceive the public, LEA AND 
PERRINS have adopted A NEW LABEL BEARING THEIR SIGNATURE, 
LEA &i PERRINS, which is placed on every bottle of WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, 
and without which none is genuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERKINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Rlackwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Dec. 30. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 

CAUTION— BETTS'S PATENT CAPSULES. 

The public nrc r<**p*>< <l"utl,v <-:cittIoi;ed lh: I t:<-lNM':in>ni Cnpftiilea 
are being infringed. BETTS*S name 18 upon every Capsule be makes lor the 
leading Merchants at home and abroad, and be Is the Only Inventor and Pole .Maker 
In the United Kingdom. Manufactokis: 1. Wharf Road, City Road, London, 

ANT' BORMKAtTX. KBA.NTK. Jane IS. 

BEST FOUD FOR INFANTS, 

Supplying the highest anion ut of nourishment In (he most 
digestible and convenient form. SAVORY & MOORE, 148 New Bond street, 
London, and all Chemists and Storekeepers throughout Canada and the United 
States. Dec. 30. 

CAREW LEDliER PAPERS 

Have no equal for making: Blank Books. John O. Hoclg-e 
& Co., Importers and Manufacturing' Stationers, 327, 329, 331 Sansomestreet 
Agents for the Pacific Coast. Nov. 4. 

WILLIAM HARNEY, 
"lyrotary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, northwest cor- 

_13l ner of Montgomery and Sacramento streets, San Franeiscj, office of Madison 
& ljurke- Aprii 2i). 

-btPINuEtt'S SALOON. 

Louis Eppinger, formerly of Ilalleck street, has removed 
to Nevada. Block (entrance on Summer street). Will be happy to see all his 
f riends. MILWAUK EE B EER a S p ecialty. ^^P 1 30 - 

B. F. Flint. Flint, Bixby & Co.] [ J. Lkk. D. W. Foloer 

A. P. FLINT & CO., 

Graders, Packers and fkealers iu Wool, corner of Battery 
and Greenwich streets, San Francisco. Jan. 29. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER 

» — 



AXD 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



ART JOTTINGS. 

The reception of the Art Association, at their new galleries, or. 
Thursday evening, gave evidence of the deep interest the members feel in 
the success of the institution, and it is to be regretted that our local 
artists do not sufficiently appreciate this feeling by giving to it their 
hearty support and contributing fresh work instead of pictures which 
have been previously shown in the windows and galleries of dealers. 
Take from this collection the pictures sent in by private parties and the 
showing would be meagre indeed. Of course, works the equal of some of 
these are not looked for from any of our local artists, bnt that is no reason 
why, if they exhibit at all, they should not contribute pictures which 
have not been shown before, and there are several in the gallery which 
are veritable shopkeepers. 

S. M. Brookes, an ex-President of the Association, whose name is 
opposite No. 1 on the catalogue, contributes several much exhibited 
pictures. 

No. 3 is by Miss Dugan, a pupil of Mr. "Williams. It is understood to 
have been a commission from Col. Eyre. It is a library scene, and quite 
equal in merit to anything we have yet seen from any of the pupils of this 
school. 

No. 4, " Job's Peak," is the only new work from Marple. The princi- 
pal features of the picture are the brilliant and glowing light upon the 
mountain and the deep shadow of the valley. _It is a picture of effects 
only, void of detail, yet powerful and commanding ; in great contrast to 
its neighbor, No. 6, "Hetch Hetchy Valley," by Eierstadt. This work 
is full of minute detail ; so much so that it weakens the picture and ren- 
ders the grandest points in it valueless except as they may serve to make 
a panorama of the scene- 
No. 9, " Gipsy Dancing Girl," by E. J. Bush. We do not know where 
Mr. Bush has seen a " Gipsy girl" looking like this one, unless in Central 
America, and she is even too black for that. The pose of the figure is 
good, as is the drawing, but in color it lacks that brilliancy which belongs 
to flesh, even if it is black. 

In No. 10 we have an excellent portrait by Wolf, good in color and 
expression, and withal a speaking likeness. 

Mr. Narjot gives us, in Nos. 12 and 44, a couple of sporting scenes, 
which, although crude in color, are quite good in drawing. Mr. Narjot 
has lately much improved in portrait painting, and it is to be regretted 
that he has not seen fit to exhibit one of his latest efforts in that direction. 

" Penelope awaiting Ulysses," No. 14, is the title of a very attractive 
picture by Cabanel, a French artist of note. To our mind, however, th/ 
flesh tints are not quite natural nor the figure perfect in drawing, notably 
the lower part of the right leg — it is too short. 

No. 3.6, The Morning- Call," is a new departure in painting for Virgil 
Williams. We have been so used to seeing figures from him of the Ital- 
ian type that any others look odd, and judging from the outcome of this 
effort it has been something of a task for him to thus turn aside fnm the 
beaten track so assiduously traveled for about twenty years. Many of 
Mr. Williams' smaller Italian pieces are gems of their kind, and now and 
again he has given us a bit of landscape which was really good. In this 
picture, however, we are unable to see any merit. The figures are unnat- 
ural and stagey looking. The woman with her hand on the door-latch 
reminds U3 of Billy Ashcroft when personating " Dinah." The drapery 
is void of texture, the fence is sadly out of drawing, and the foliage is of 
that uncertain character which is not admissable in a picture where details 
are set forth with such exactitude. 

Irwin gives ui in No. 17, a large portrait of Mark McDonald, which we 
consider one of the best portraits in the room. The pose is most natural, 
the coloring excellent and expression inimitable. No. 20 is another large 
portrait by this artist, of a little eirl. It looks crude, as if not 
quite finished. The flesh wants a good deal of toning to bring it to that 
of a miss of 6 years. No. 18, called " The Isle of Monte Cristo," by 
James Hamilton, is supposed to be a marine view, but is in reality a huge 
and fantastical nonentity. At the left hand of the picture we have Mr. 
Hamilton's usual sunset, and on the right a mass of what are supposed to 
be rocks, over which tumbles what is intended for a stream of water. 
This, together with a waste space, which we are to imagine is the sea, 
completes a picture 6x12 feet (more or less), occupying the choice position 
in the gallery, and must have cost Mr. Hamilton at least ten hours hard 
work to produce. No. 19 we take to be the "Choir of the Church of 
San Severino," in Naples, and not, as per catalogue, " The Chair of San 
Severius." It is one of the best pictures in the collection — quiet, unob- 
trusive and poetical in both quality and subject. The scene is evidently 
just after church. The choristers have all gone but one, and the officiat- 
ing priest is just stepping down from b» reading desk, while another is 
passing through the door. All three of these figures are so naturally ren- 
dered that with the evident truth and rich texture of the object paint- 
ing in it, we have a really superb work of art. No. 21, " Love Making," 
by Bouguereau, is another fine picture from a private collection. Of the 
many works from this artist shown here, we remember none as brilliant in 
color and rich in tone as this excellent picture which is loaned from th« 
collection of Gen. Colton. 

Mr. Denny, a prime mover in founding the Association, and for a time 
a most enthusiastic contributor, gives us but two pictures, both of which 
have been exhibited before. 

No. 27, by Wilsch, of Milan, "A Carpet Bazaar at Cairo," is quite good 
in color and drawing, but wanting in the brilliant effects the subject is 
capable of producing under the hand of a master. 

Mr. Keith, one of our most popular artists, is represented by quite a 
number of works, all of which, it is to be regretted, have been before ex- 
hibited. 

No. 30. " The Monastery in Arms," by Vibert, of Paris, is a notable 
picture, having attracted much attention in Europe as well as New 
York, where it was for some time on view. The perfect, and notably 
different,, expressions of each of the twenty monks in line, the 
one at the foot being as carefully rendered as any of the others, is a feat 
in genre painting which would establish the fame of any artist. The 
effect of light as it comes through the door, where stands the grotesque 
commander, is superb and in striking, yet harmonious, contrast to the 
monasterial surroundings. The scene is supposed to represent a Spanish 
convent in 1811, and the picture was painted in 18i>8, not having, it 
seems, found a purchaser until last season, when it was purchased by Mr. 
Charles Crocker, who is the owner of four other works in the collection. 

No. 31 is a landscape by " Corot," a French artist, now deceased. The 
works of this painter were much sought after by art collectors imme- 
diately after his death, but the high prices offered brought upon the 



at 12 M.: 



Paris market in 1874 such an avalanche of " Corots " that prices fell, and 
it is thought that his works have been imitated and sold to a great extent; 
not a very difficult task, judging from this specimen. It has, perhaps, 
a good quality of color and a certain breadth of execution, but if it can 
be called a picture, what would a sketch by the same artist look like ? 

No. 35, by Beard, of New York, is a comical subject. A number of 
dogs and a monkey are made to represent the poverty and affluence of 
Gotham. The delicate hound draped in clothing with armorial bearings is 
typical of the real aristocrat, and the porkish pug fastened to his collar of 
wealth gives the type of shoddy so prevalent in that metropolis. 

A superb picture is the " Standard Bearer," No. 39, by Gues, of Paris, 
the most brilliantly finished piece of figure painting in the room. The 
handling of the background is of such character as to highten the effect 
upon the one object, the figure. 

No 42 is a good example of one of the early portrait painters of Amer- 
ica — Gilbert Stewart. Its chief merit is in the freshness of its coloring, 
and proves that the old painters were stronger colorists than their fel- 
lows of the present day. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEA*T?HTV COMPANY. 

The Company's steamers will sail as follows 
CITY OF TOKIO, March 1st, for YOKOHAMA and HONG>K< 'NO. 

CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, February IGth, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, call- 
ing at MAZATLAN. SAN BLAS, MANZAN1LLO and ACAPULGO, connecting at Ac- 
apulco with company's steamer for all Mexican and Central American ports south of 
Acapulco. Tickets to and from Europe by any lina for sale. 

CITY OF SYDNEY, Febrtiarv 28th, at 12 o'clock, noon, or on arrival of the En- 
glish mails, for HONOLULU, KANDAVAU, AUCKLAND, SYDNEY and PORT 
CHALMERS. To Sydney or Auckland— Upper Saloon, $210; Lower Saloon, $200. 

CITY OF PANAMA, Feb. 10th, DAKOTA, Feb. 20th, and alternately on the 10th, 
20th and 30th of each month, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, TA- 
COMA and OLYMP1A. connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for 
PORTLAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before II a.m. on day of sailing. 
For freight or passage apply at the office, corner of First and Brannan streets. 

February 10. WILLIAMS. BLANCH AKD fr CO., Agenta. 

S. F- & N. P. H. R. 

(Ihange of Time. — On and after Saturday, February 10th, 
J the steamer JAMES M. DuNAHUE, Captain W. Warner, will leave Washington 
street wharf , daily (Sundays included), at 3 p.m., connecting at Donahue with can 
for Cloverdale and intermediate stations. Connection made at Fulton with the 
Fulton and Guernville Branch to Korbel's Mills and the Gre^t Redwood Forests. 
The train leaves Cloverdale daily (Sundays included), at G a.m., connecting with 
steamer at Donahue for San Francisco. Close connections made with stages for So- 
noma, the Geysers, Ukiah, Clear Lake, Mendocino, Mark West, Skaggs' and Littons' 
Springs. Freight received on wharf from 7 A.M. to 2:30 P.M. Sunday Trips— Until 
further notice, the steamer will leave Green-street Wharf every Sunday at 3 p.m. for 
Cloverdale and way stations. General Office, 426 Montgomery street. 

A. A. BEAN, Superintendent. P. DONAHUE, President. 

P. E. DOUGHERTY, Gen'l Pas. & Ticket Agent. 

Notice.— Change of Wharf.— On and after SATURDAY, February 10th, 1S77, the 
steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE wiil leave Washington-street Wharf. Feb. 10. 

F3R ARIZONA AND MEXUMN POBTS 
lor Cape Sail Lucas, La Paz, Mazatlau, Cruaymas and the 

Colorado River, touching at Magdalena Bay, should sufficient inducement 
offer. — 'Die Steamship NEWBERN. Wm. Mctzger, Master, will leave for the above 
ports on WEDNESDAY, Feb. 14th, at 12 o'clock m., from Folsoni-st. Wharf, connect- 
ing at the Mouth of the Colorado River with the Steamboats and Barges of the Colorado 
Steam Navigation Company for all points on the River. Through Bills of Lading 
will be furnished and none others signed. Freight will be received on Wednesday, Feb. 
7. No freight received for Mexican Ports after Tuesday, Feb. 13, at 12, noon, and Bills 
of Lading for those ports must be accompanied by Custom House and Consular Clear- 
ances. For freight or passage apply to 
February 10. J. BERMINGHAM, Agent, 10 Market street. 

FOR PORTLAND, ORE30N. 
he Only Direct Line.— -Steamship Ajax. Maekie, Com- 
mander, leaves Folsom-strcet wharf, SATURDAY, Feb 10th, at 10 a.m. 
February 10. K. VON OTERENDORP, Agent, 210 Battery street. 

NOBLE & OALLAGHTR, 

Importers and Dealers in Painters'' Materials. House, Sign 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jsckson street, between Montgomery - and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 

THOMAS t>AY, 

Importer of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Gilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Jan. 27. 



F° 



T 



DIVIDEND NOTICES. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Home Mutual Insurance Company .—This Company will 
pay a dividend of 1 per cent, upon the capital stock on and after February 
10, 1877. CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary, 

February 10. 40li California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

Odd Fellows* Savings Bank.— The Board of Directors of 
the Odd Fellows' Savings Bank have declared a dividend of eight and one-fourth 
(8JJ per cent, per annum on Permanent Deposits, and of seven and three-tenths 
(7 3-10) per cent, per annum on Short Deposits, for the semi-annual term ending De- 
cember 31st, 1S7G, payable on and after the 22d instant. 
S an Francisc o , Jan." 11, 1877. [ Jan. 13.] JAMES BENSON, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
~asonie Savings and Loan Bank, Xo. 6 Post Street, 

_ Masoui* Temple, San Francisco. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of 
this Bank, held January 18th, 1877, a Dividend was declared at the rate of Nine (9) 
per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and Seven and One-Half (7.J) per cent, per an- 
num on Ordinary Deposits, for the Semi-Annual Term ending January 21st, 1877, 
payable on and after January 25th, 1877, free of Federal Taxes. 
Jan. 27. H. T. CRAVES, Secretary. 



M a 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 019 Clay street.-<-At a meeting of 
the Board of Directors, a Dividend was declared for the term ending December 
31, 1876, at the rate of eight (8) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of 
Federal Tax, and payable on and after January 15, 1877. 
Jan. 15. C YR US W. CA JtMANY, Ca shier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French mutual Provident Savings and Loan Society.. —A 
Dividend of nine (9) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Taxes, for the six 
months ending December 31, 1870, was declared at the Annual Meeting held on Jan- 
uary 16, 1877, payable on and after January 17, 1877. By order. 
Jan. 2a QUSTAVE MAHE, Director. 



LO, 1877, 



CALIFORNIA ai»\ I i;n>i u. 



1:; 



SWINDLING LIQUOR DEALERS 
Tho follow mt conespoisdeiK ■ I t.. tho London 

mi. I will provoke many ■ smlla un ilii- i 

On ih.- 23d of wine 

aa that of all my family. 
I found it t< of champagne. Ail our wil 

«t work to find out who oould b« the generous donor. 1 at but fixed 
■pon i to thank bim raf lii-> generous gift. B 

lliv thank-, :ill.l fbt the DOSt of IVUODa In* did DOt 

■and it. Upon receiving * call from :i neighboring rector, I found that be 
mi the Mine day bad received ■ similar caaa. He wai equally ;tt ■ I 
know who had sent it. At last we both fixed upon ■ noble earl who owned 
rable property in our pariahea, and reaofvad to tender our thanks 
upon the hrst opportunity, whan behold tlii-- morning's post solved the 

London. January 4tb. 

DiB ; On the 13th I wrote the enclosed letter to you, and have only 

i that, through the i ■ one of my clerks, it was, 

with many other Letters and documents, mid on one side and not posted, 

which neglect, 1 nan assure you, lias ooused me much annoyance, as 

many ol them were of the greatest importance. I sincerely hope, alter 

explanation, you will exonerate me from all blame. At the same time 1 

much regret any trouble caused by you having a oaae of wine and not 

knowing from whom it came My late clerk, in whom I placed implicit 

confidence, baa, 1 am sorry to say, lately given way to intemperate halt- 

its, ;ui.l it. was ii"t until after hit* mnmifiaal that I discovered such discrei - 

.,- 1 haw- mentioned above. Again arjoliguung for the trouble 

I, awaiting your reply, 1 am. Sir, yours obediently, " ." 



, which is an amusing addition 



The Kttcr that accompanied tin-. En the same enclosure is a* follows ■ 

" London, Dec L2. 1876. 

"TbiRev.- — -: Sir, Having bought a large quantity of Baron la 

Tour Champagne under the value, would yon permit me to semi a dozen 

ample, 'carriage paid'! 5Tou will be at perfect liberty to try a 

bottle free of chai ge. Enclosed is a stamp to reply, and in tin- event of 

my ii"t hearing anything from you to the contrary, 1 shall conclude 1 

may take the liberty of tending you the sample dozen. The prices as 

f«.li,»us : l to G do*., 36s. per doe.; 12 doc, 36a.; 24 dot and upwards. 

i dor. I enclose a list of a few of my patrons, who I am sure will 

testify to the quality of my wines. 1 am. Sir, yours obediently. 

" 1\ S. -I have no hesitation in Baring you will find the wine very 
elo-ap, and much muter the usual price." 

This wine came just before < 'hristmaa Ihiy, was considered as a present, 
has been partly consumed on the occasion of a Christmas dinner, the 
health of the unknown donor drunk, when, behold, 11 days after Christ- 
mas the above explanation, and the poor parson called upon to pay fur 
what he never would have thought of ordering. 

I hope some of your readers will advise me what to do on the occasion. 
I am, sir, A COUHTBY Pabson. 

The Pali Mail Oaeette adds the following 
to t he foregoing : 

Chbisthas Hampers.— Under this head some very useful and also 
amusing letters have appeared in the daily papers. There is no doubt that 
a healthy exposure now and then of city ways docs a world of good. The 
light that hits fallen upon the Stock Exchange, company promoters, 
11 financial agents," liquidators, and others has done good service. It is 
now being turned upon smaller men, and the custom of certain architects 
of exacting commissions from builders has been fully discussed. But the 
most startling experience is connected with the wine trade, of which it is 
not yet clear whether country clergymen or scheming wine importers are 
to be tic sufferers, though there 18 not much difficulty in deciding who 
might to be. It seems that a number of country clergymen received ham- 
pers of wine at Christmas which were assumed to be presents from some 
unknown friend ; but when half the wine had been consumed, came an 
intimation that it was a sample dozen, of which the receiver was at perfect 
liberty to try a sample bottle. There have been many suggestions about 
what shall be done, but the following, we should think, effectually dis- 
poses of the difficulty : 

Sik :— If you deem my reply to the purveyor of " The Christmas Ham- 
per" this year of any use to those who have asked advice how to act in the 
matter, I shall be obliged by your insertion of it. It is as follows: 
" From the Rev. Gerard Baneks, Cobham Vicarage, Surrey, to Mr. A. 

Fielding, importer of high class wines, etc., Denbigh Hall, Old Jewry. 
'•Cob. Vic, Surrey, Jan. 10, 1877. 

"Sib: On Dec. 23, 1©76, I received a case containing one dozen of 
champagne, addressed to me as above, but without any letter of advice. 
On Jan. 5, 1H77, I received a letter from you, informing me that the case 
had been sent by you as a sample, and that the letter of advice had been 
delayed owing to the intemperate habits of your ' late clerk,' and also 
inclosing the delayed letter, dated the 12th or the 17th of December, 1876. 

'■Assuming the wine to be a present from some friend, 1 gladly shared 
it with friends, and we enjoyed five bottles out of the dozen before yours 
of the 4th inst. came to hand. You will wish to know what I intend to 
do in the matter, so. I now write to tell you that, under advice, I do not 
intend to pay one farthing for those five bottles of wine, nor shall I pur- 
chase the remaining seven bottles, or return them. But I must request 
you to send, during the next few days, a duly authorized agent, whom I 
will allow to go into my cellar and remove them; but 1 will not myself, 
nor permit any one in my employ, to take the very slightest trouble in 
the matter. — Gerard Bancbs, Vicar of Cobham, Surrey." 

If you can find space for this, my reply to Mr. A. Fielding, you will 
much oblige. Yours, very faithfully, Gerard Bancks. 

Cobham Vicarage, Jan. 10. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Orig-innl Comstock Golil and Silver Milling- Company.— 
Location o( principal place of business, San Francisco, California. Location 
of works, Storey county, Nevada. Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the .Hli day of February, 1877, an assessment (No. 1) of 
50 cents per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the Company, 
330 Pine street, San Francisco, California. Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 5th day of March, 1877, will be delinquent, and adver- 
tised for sale at public auction, and unless payment is made before, will be sold on 
TUESDAY, the 20th day of March, 1S77, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. Bv order of the Board of Directors. 

THOMAS E. ATKINSON, Secretary. 
Office— 330 Pine street, San Francisco, California February 10. 




HI3HEST STOCK QU0TATI0N6 FOB WEEK ENDING FEB 







AlU 

Atlantic ( 'on 

Up.. 

■•• rial . 





Belcher 

Belcher . 

Balto Con 

•Bullion 

Baltic 

Boston . . 

Li tmont 



•Crown Point . .. 

Cbollu 

Con. Virginia 

California 

I tall donia 

Cosmopolitan- .. 
Cons Imperial . .. 

• ii. 

Confidence 

Con Comstock . . 

ChallangD 

Dayton. 

Dardanelles. . ■ - 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

Globe 

Gould & Currj . 
Great Eastern*. .. 

Gilo 

Golden Chariot . . 
General Thomas. 

Crand Prize 

Cold Bun 

" Hale & Norcross 



Julia J. 

Justice 

Jackson 

■fornix Glynn ... 

Jefferson 

Kossuth 

Kentuck 

Knickerbocker . 

K. K. Cons 

Lady Bryan 

Leopard 

Lady Wash'n . . . 

Lt-\ Mtlian 

Loyal 

Leeds 

Mexican 

Monumental 

•Mint 

Mansfield 

Mode 

Manhattan , 

Meteor 

Meadow Valley .. 

Melonea 

Martha 61 Bessie, 

New COSO 

Northern Belle . . 
N. Con. Virginia. 

Nevada 

"New York 

Niagara 

N. Monumental.. 

N". Light 

Ophir 

Overman 

Occidental ...... 

Og, Comstock. .. 

Oregon 

Prospect .. . . 

Poonnan 

Phil Sheridan .. . 

Panther 

Raymond & Ely. 

KisingStar 

Bock Island 

'Savage 

Sierra Nevada ... 

Silver Hil 

Syndicate- 

Senator 

Superior 

Shasta 

Southern Star. . . 

Succor 

Seg Belcher 

South Chariot . . . 

S. \. Water 

S. Modoc 

Trojan 

Trenton 

Twin Peaks 

Union Con 

Utah 

Union Flag 

Washoe 

Woodville 

Wells Fargo 

Ward 

WestComstock .. 
Yellow Jacket . .. 



Mqwpat r. sakaT, | ,, K *i.v 



93 10 
17 19J 






4 
25J — 



'•i: 



«i| 



loj 



ZOi 



I8J 






3 *1 



103 10 10} 




171 



15J ' 15J I Hi 



16* 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 






•4 

84- 

ll 
Jl 

(2 



221 

_!* 

123 



_3 

J 



A 



ml 



iiii 



U 

254 
95 



it; 



-8 

143 



The Rev. Wm. A. Scott, D. D. , will preach Sunday in St. John's 
Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and Taylor, at 11 A. M. 
and 7$ P. M. Public cordially inviter 1 . 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER 



AND 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



How oiice a king in evil hour 
Hung musing o'er his castle wall, 
And, lost in idle dreams, let fall 
Into the sea his ring of power. 



BIRTHDAY VERSES. 

WRITTEN IN" A CHILD' S ALBUM. 

tTwaa sung of old in hut and hall Therein are set four jewels rare: 

Pearl winter, summer's ruby blaze, 
Spring's emerald, and, than all more 

fair, 
Fall's pensive opal, doomed to bear 
A heart of fire bedreamed with haze. 
Then, let him sorrow as he might, 
And pledge his daughter and his To him the simple spell who knows 

throne The spirits of the ring to sway, 

To who restored the jewel bright, Fresh power with every sunrise flows, 
The broken spell would ne'er unite; And rnyal pursuivants are those 
The grim old ocean held his own. That fly his mandates to obey. 

Those awful powersonman thatwait,But he that with a slackened will 
On man, the beggar or the king, Dreams of things pastor things to be, 
To hovel bare or hall of state From him the charm is slipping still, 

A magic ring that masters fate And drops, ere he suspects the ill, 

With each succeeding birthday bring. Into the inexorable sea. 

— James Russell Lowell in the Atlantic. 



ANECDOTES OP THE FRENCH STAGE. 

Playgoers, to whom the theaters at the season of damp nights and 
pantomimes do not offer so much attraction as usual, might spend a pleas- 
ant evening just now in company with Victor Fournel's " Theatrical Cu- 
riosities " or Charles Maurice's " Anecdotical History of the Theater," to 
name only two of the better known out of the thousand and one books on 
the traditions and scandal of the French stage. One is inclined to say 
the French stage, not because the country of Shakspeare and Sheridan 
has a less splendid or interesting dramatic history than the country of 
Moliere and Racine, but simply because in the matter of theatrical history 
the Gaul is apt to write in a livelier fashion than the Briton, eschewing 
the tedious, however valuable it might seem, and being moreover remark- 
ably free from the trammels of a too strict conventionalism. France 
having long been a Catholic country, the stage was, of course, vigorously 
proscribed by the clergy, and yet stories of remarkably " pious " actors 
are among the most ancient which have been handed down by successive 
generations of the histrionic race. Racine the Younger assures us that 
he knew an actor and actress belonging to an Italian company " who 
lived like two saints," and never went on the stage without previously 
donning each a hair shirt. Mme. Gonthier, who made her first appear- 
ance at the Comedie Italienne in 1778, was also extremely religious. 
Often when she had to play a new part she might be seen falling on her 
knees behind one of the slips and praying with emotion, " Mon Dieu, 
faites-moi la grace de bi-cn savoir mon role!" In Brazier's "Ckronique des 
Petits Tfieatres" there is cited a still more homely instance of devotional 
sentiment. 

A strolling troupe were playing the Two Hunters at the time of the 
thunder storm. At the most critical moment, when it behooved the bear 
to remember he was a beast, a terrible peal, following upon an unusually 
vivid flash, frightened the animal out of all self-possession. He solemnly 
rose on his hind legs and made the sign of the cross. In spite of these 
edifying examples, the stage is still thought immoral by the French pre- 
cisians, who, in theory, are perhaps even more strait-laced than our own. 
Sophie Arnould, who ought to be an authority, considered that the whole 
duty of an actress was to be prudent; " never to fall in love except with 
a fortune," as she told a very youthful lady who had been indiscreet 
enough to think of marrying a second violin. The mother was present 
while her daughter was being gravely but not unkindly lectured by Mile. 
Arnould, and when the latter had ceased speaking, she exclaimed with 
rapture, " Oh, Mademoiselle, why is not my child like you! It is not 
surprising you are so rich." Many indeed are the stories told of Mile. 
Arnould, who was as witty as she was pitiless. Baehaumont, in his " Se- 
cret Memoirs," says that one day, provoked beyond endurance by the 
jealousy of M. de Lauraguais, she determined on breaking with him, and 
accordingly ordered round the carriage he had given her, placing in it 
every present she had ever received from him, including some valuable 
diamonds and two children, and dispatched the whole to the Countess de 
Lauraguais, with her compliments. 

One day, when, in a period of political trouble, she was about to give a 
supper, it was suspected that some of her guests were gentlemen very 
much wanted by the authorities of the Bastille. The Lieutenant of Police, 
a high and mighty personage in the days of the old regime, sent for her 
and asked their names. Sophie had forgotten. "But a woman like you 
ought to remember these things." "Yes, Monseigneur; but before a man 
like you I am no longer a woman like myself." Of course the supper was 
put off, and the conspirators— if conspirators they were — had timely 
warning conveyed to them. Possibly, too, if she seemed heartless, it was 
that the iron of poverty had once entered her soul. Some one happened 
in her presence to make use of tUe expression, " Pays of innocence and 
youth.' "Ah. yes, I remember them," interposed Sophie Arnould, quite 
gravely; " how wretched I was !" 

Sophie Arnould did well to be courageous, for much is forgiven to 
hardihood. It is related of a living celebrity of the French stage that he 
was playing before a provincial audience. Having a headache he acted 
indifferently, and the piece was, moreover, a bad one. A storm of hisses 
arose from the pit. " Idiots !" exclaimed M. X., and withdrew without 
further ceremony. The public, by a continuous roar, signified its deter- 
mination that he should apologize. The inevitable commissaire de police, 
who might almost be called the deus ex maehina of French history, was 
not slow in making his appearance, and M. X. was compelled to come 
forward and make his excuses, which were ingeniously turned. "Gentle- 
men," he began, " I said you were idiots, it is true. I beg your pardon, 
I am wrong." The idiots proved themselves generous, as well as men of 
sense by applauding him to the echo. It would not be well, however, to 
take such liberties with an audience as were taken by Mdlle. Laguerre, 
of the Opera, who drew her inspiration, as our classic grandfathers might 
have phrased it, from Bacchus rather than from the Muses. She was 
called " Iphigeuia in Champagne," from the original manner in which 
she impersonated " Iphigenia in Tauris." 

There is, by the way, a curious story told of the manner in which 
Frederic the Great could deal, where other men had failed, with a prima 
donna of the period who was inclined to set too little store by the public. 
Tnis great artist seemed to catch a cold, which had the effect of render- 



ing her hoarse, and consequently unable to sing, whenever anybody or 
thing had displeased her. One day a certain opera was to be performed 
at Berlin before the King himself. At the appointed hour the manager 
come forward and said : "Ladies and gentlemen, we grieve to inform you 
that our prima donna has a sore throat, and that the representation an- 
nounced cannot therefore take place." The stolid Teutonic audience 
seemed no whit surprised, and was moving out tranquilly, when the 
King rose and commanded the musicians to keep their places. The 
audience sat down again and waited patiently on events. In less than a 
quarter of an hour the manager reappeared and spoke as follows : 
" Ladies and gentlemen, I have the most unfeigned pleasure in informing 
you that our prima donna is completely cured of her sore throat, and 
will have the honor to sing before you tonight." Surely enough the 
famous singer soon appeared, and never had she sung better. Her tri- 
umph was cainplete. The King's prescription had been a very simple 
one. The prima donna, having dismissed the unhappy manager, 
was sitting comfortably before the fire in her own room, and rather 
pleased at the idea of having spoiled the pleasure of several hun- 
dreds, of persons, when the door was violently thrown open, 
and there entered an officer, followed by four dragoons. 
"Mademoiselle," quoth the officer, "the King, my master, has sent 
me to ask after your health." "The King is very good ; I have a bad 
sore throat." " His Majesty knows it, and has charged me to take you 
at once to the military hospital, where you will be cured in a few days." 
Mademoiselle turned pale. "You are jesting," she simpered ; but Prus- 
sian officers, she was informed, never jested. The lieutenant gave the 
order to his men, who seized Mademoiselle and carried her out of the 
theater. A coach was in attendance ; the lady was deposited therein ; 
the officer took his place beside, after shouting the address to the driver, 
" The military hospital;" and off they went, the dragoons riding along- 
side. In a few seconds, " Stay," said the lady ; " I think I feel better." 
" The King is anxious, Mademoiselle, that you should feel quite restored, 
and even that you should sing to-night." "I will try," murmured the 
prisoner. " Back to the theater," cried the officer to the coachman. Ar- 
rived there, Mademoiselle began to think she had yielded too easily. "I 
will sing, since his Majesty commands me," she said, "but God knows 
how." "You will sing," replied the officer, "like the great artist you 
are." "I shall sing like an artist with a bad cold." "I think not." 
"And why?" " Because a couple of dragoons will be in attendance be- 
hind the scenes, and at the least couac they have orders to arrest you and 
carry you again to the military hospital." The hoarseness was now com- 
pletely goue. — Pall Mall Budget. 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 



A. 1 



CTJTTEB WHISKY. 
P. Ilotaliiicr «l- Co., -\o. 431 Jackson street, are the Hole 

Agents on this Coast for the celebrated J. H. CUTTER WHISKY, shipped di- 
rect to them from Louisville, Kentucky. The Trade are cautioned against the pur- 
chase of inferior and imitation brands of "J. H. Cutter Old Bourbon." Owing to 
its deserved reputation, various unprincipled parties are endeavoring to palm off 
spurious grades. It is really the Best Whisky in the United States. March 19. 

A. M. OILMAN, 

Importer and Wholesale Liqnor Dealer, 308 California 
street, offers for sale Fine Old Bourbon and Rye Whiskies, Brandies, vintage of 
lS20and 1S30, Old Port and Sherry Wines, Still and Sparkling Wines, etc. Agent for the 
Celebrated CACHET BLANC CHAMPAGNE. Sole Agent for MILLS" STOMACH 
BITTERS. March i. 

J. H. CUTTER OLD BOTTREON. 

CP. Moorman * Co., Manufacturers, Louisville, Hy.— 
• The above well-known House is represented here by the undersigned, who 
have been appointed their Sole Agents fur the Pacific Coast. 
July 3. A. P. HOTALING & CO., 429 and 431 Jackson street, S. F. 

J. H. CUTTER'S OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKY, 
"\Tanuf acl ared by Milton J. Hardy A- Co., Sons-in-Law and 



Successors of J. 
August 14. 



. CUTTER, Louisville, Ky. E. MARTIN &, CO., 

No. 408 Front street. Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast 



JOHN BUTLER, 

Dealer in Wines and Liquors, English Ales and Porter, 7 
Sutter Street and 506 Market Street, San Francisco. Jan. 27. 



BROKERS. 



R. C. Hooker, Thomas Gardiner, 

Member S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. Late of the Sacramento " Union." 

GAB DINER & HOOKER, 

(Commission Stock Brokers, 336 Pine street, north side, one 
J door below Montgomery, San Francisco, Cal. Buy and sell only on commission. 
Liberal advances made on active accounts. Dec. 23. 

REMOVAL ! 

JW. Brown A Co., Stoek and Money Brokers, have re- 
» moved to No. 317 Montgomery street, Nevada Block, 
J. W. Brown, Member S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. Jan S. 

J. K. S. Latham.] LATHAM & KING, [Homer S. Kino. 

Successors to James H. Latham A Co., Stock and Money 
Brokers, 411 California street, San Francisco. Member S. F. Stock and Exchange 
Board. Stocks bought and carried on margins. Aug. 12. 

HUBBARD & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers, 334 1-3 Montgomery street, un- 
der Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco, will transact business through the 
San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board. July 17. 



E. P. PECKHAM, 
Broker and Member S. 



F. Stock Ex- 



/Commission _ 

*^ change, 413 California street. Stocks bought, sold and carried. Liberal ad- 



vances made on active accounts. 



Orders receive prompt execution and return. 
[June. 19.] 



S fc 



D. M. Hosmeju] H03MER & BODRNE, IJ B. Bourne. 

itock Brokers, 116 Hal look street, San Francisco. Post- 

' office Address, Lock Box 1837. M arch 25. 

REMOVAL. 

Lovelaud, David A Co., from 108 I*eidesdorfT street to No. 
421 California street, corner Leidesdorff. Feb. 26. 



ftb. 1". L877. 



COURT CHAT, 

Ani the Upper Ten Thou-uud at Home and Abroad. 



CALIFORNIA AI>\ ERTISER. 

MEDICAL DIRECTORY. 



16 



The Countess de Bpaxre,nnc« Mile. Nmldi, an intimate friend 

cUj General de 
In r, nnil miule hrr In- wife. She wai exl 
ul, it i»||".u-, .in.! fur twenty yean and more formed i ■ 

F Paris, both for her great beauty and horwunder- 
fully sym|>athetic voice. In the drawim] room shs excelled (n dramatic 
■ tic- "Mail t.iri," th* " Hunter's W ife," etc., a hich are "f 
the Heurj Run* ll school, but now entirely ont of fashion. Although ra- 
llied from th lame de Spam sane frequently for charitable 
M.t, Indeed, tin- greater part of her lift* was spent in «:liarita- 
iili- deeds. And yet ihe dit she van leaving her village 
church, after hat ing attended • midnight mass, sin- died almost on the 
threshold of the little church, The last accents of her voice were raised 
. raises to Him who sendoth peat e and bli isingB upon earth. 
a ho knew her intimately writes thus of her: "If I were to reveal 
all that she wished c I revealed the fabulous sums which she 
distributed to the poor in France, Italy. Guadeloupe, and the whole world 
it would be seen that by her voice only she gave more than all oar mill- 
lanaires with their bags "f gold." 

One of the strongest men in Europe (a the Osarewitch. He could 
easily beat u Guy Livingstone" in crashing pewter pots with lii* hand. 
: ■ .i remarkable story told of him which runs as follows: He found 
that lus private tetters had been opened while pa*«i"B through th-- Post- 
office. IK- went to tin- Cur and begged t<> know if tin* was done by hia 
orders ; it it were, lit- [the * laarewitch), a.-* a dutiful sun, would submit; if 
nut. he deman The Csar sent f'»r the guilty party, the Chief 

of Police, severely reprimanded him in the presence "f the Czarewitch, and 
bade him be gone, Terrified, he was hastening out of the loom, when 
the Osarewitch, who had been a silent spectator, placed in the chiefs 
hands a small object. It was a silver rouble which, oaring the interview, 
he had twisted round and round like n corkscrew. With this startling 
proof of the concentrated wrath **f the heir to the throne the luckless 
functionary took his departure. 

Mr. Chevalier has just finished f->r the Prince «>f Wales a water-color 
drawing of the ball at the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, which took 
puce after the marriage of (he Duke and Duchess of Edinburgh. The 
bride is just being led forward by her father, and the bridegroom is lead- 
ing forward his mother-in-law into the centre of the ball room, while close 
around are other members "f the two Royal Houses, our eldest Prince 
very conspicuous among them : and the background is made up of innu- 
merable distinguished persona and courtiers in brilliant costumes. Mr. 
Chevalier has now very nearly completed his great picture of the opening 
of the Vienna Exhibition, which ie also a Royal commission, and he waits 
only for a portrait of one of the officials in order U> linish his long and 
difficult task. 

The first meet of this year at Rome took place at the Torre delle Val- 
le, -i\ miles from the Porta St. Paola. A fair field was out, but only four 
Englishmen of the number. .Amongst those present were, the Duke of 
Gr&zaoli and hie brother, Prince Doria. II Marbhese Calabrhii, Prince 
Borghese, Prince Udescalchi, Prinze Altieri, Messrs. Hadow, Victor Pa- 
get, tiraham (of Netherby), and J. C. Reade. The hounds were well 
turned out, and the huntsman and whip, who are both Englishmen, were 
remarkably well mounted. After drawing the first cover blank, a fnx was 
found iu the open, which gave a good run of about twenty minutes, but 
1 by running to ground. On the whole the first meet of 1877 was 
decidedly a great success. 

All readers of history know the important part which Russian ladies 
have played in the secret diplomacy of that Power at foreign Courts. An 
extremely clever Russian lady who, during the last twelve months has 
settled in London, has been of great use to her Government, and has ably 
seconded Count Schouvaloff in his necessarily more open diplomacy. The 
lady, from her i"»iti<>n, is able to devote her whole energies to what may 
be called the diplomacy of the salon. She is highly connected, and has 
therefore found easy admission into English society, and her wit, enthu- 
siasm, and intelligence arc said to have had a powerful effect on more than 
one. 

Indian loyalty has produced a flood of native poetic productions in 
commemoration of the Imperial proclamation at Delhi. One Hindoo 
Mus. Doc. has brought out a description in Sanskrit poetry of the Queen's 
dominion, set to the national music of the various countries, and entitled 
Victoria Samrajgun, and a history of England and India in Bengali verse, 
Bet to Bengali music, and intended to represent the union of the two na- 
tions. Lord Lytton, too, comes in for his share of honors, as the same 
author has translated several of "Owen Meredith's poems, and adapted 
them to Hindoo music, while the Nawab of Loharoo has composed a lyr- 
ical biography of the Viceroy. 

The Duke of Wellington is going to issue a sixth volume of the Civil 
and Political Correspondence <>f his father, in continuation of the former 
series. This volume bears upon the Eastern Question in the years 1828 
and 1829, etc., as the following extracts from the list of contents show: 
The Eastern CJuestion iu 18211; Designs of Russian Intrigues ; Affairs of 
Turkey ; the Greek Question ; the Duke's Observations on the Treaty of 
Adrianople ; Remonstrance to Russia ; Sovereignty of Greece, etc. 

Count Luigi Maatai, the nephew of the Pope, has just died at San 
Benedetto, near Sinigaglia, whither he had gone in quest of health. The 
Voce tttUa Verita and the Osscrratore Romano are full of solicitude lest 
this, the latest of so many bereavements, may impair that Life on which, 
says the Voce, rest our hopes. Count Luigi, born in 1814, was the son of 
Pope'3 brother Gabriel, and was married to one of the Princesses, del 
Drago. 

It is announced from Rome that on the episcopal Jubilee of bis Ho- 
liness (May 21st) there will be a grand reception at the Vatican, and a 
presentation of the gifts of all the Catholic world. These will be pre- 
viously exhibited in the hall of the Vatican. All the gifts intended for 
this occasion to be forwarded before the end of March to Prince Altieri, 
at the Palazzo Altieri. 

Piincesa Charles of Prussia, the sister of the German Empress, is 
seriously ill. 



TH. HUNTER'S PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS. 

rilormito School ol rlcillel lie. Toronto. July llth. IHIIS.... 

1 

■ 
tin ftfodl ; i II II. \\ tUi-II I 

l»r. ii ■ ■ 1 1 bar in, 



TEETH SAVED! 



Filling i» «iii n Specialty .—ere* * patience riinidH to 
children Chloroform administered, and tooth itkUtfuIh extracted Alter ten 



>. un Mutant pnetias, I van (juaront- e atlehu , 

Butter Mreeti above Uoiftgomerj jJun- 



I'. |i ■ m den) 
Uli. MORFFEW, Dentin 



M 



DE. J. H. STAL T ARD, 
ember of the Royal College of IMiyslclaiiM, London, cic, 
, author ol '* Female Hygiene on the PecUtaGouL" B.E. Peat and Kearny, 

iuiilv H.mr-'. ij iu :i ami 7 t<- ? i.u. Febnurj i". 

ARTIFICIAL TEETH. 

Beautiful rcllnlold plates made by Dr. Jcssup, corner 
Sutter and Montgomery streets, at |S0 a set, are (or tmperlur to vulcanite nib- 
ber, and the duIox ol the natural gum. Feb 20. 



I'lMMdW. MIU.H»\ AND ACCOITHEIB, 

J. J. AUERBACH, M.D.. 
March 13. 310A Stockton street, Sun Francisco. 

STEELE'S SQUIRREL POISON. 
[Patented October 1HM, 167S.] 

S are death to Squirrels, lints, Gophers, etc. For sale by nil 
Druggiste, Grocers and General Dealers. Price, 81 per box. Made by JAMES 
Q. STEELE a: CO., San Francisco, Cal. Liberal discount to the Trade. Aug. 21, 

0. P. WARREN, M7D\ 
clectie Physician, corner of Foarlecnth and Broadway, 

Oakland. June 17- 



E 



N. MILLER, M.D., 

Physician, Oakland. Oflicc, 1004 Broadway ; Residence, 364 
Eighth street. Octulivr 2. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

D. F. HiTCHisos. D. SI. Domra, J. Sakdbrson. 

PHCEVIX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1850.--- Hutching;* A Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oila, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO. 

Wholesale Auction House, 204 and 206 California street. 
Sale days, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10 a.m. Cash advances on consign- 
ments. Dec. 14. 

CHARLES LE WAY, 
American Commission Merchant, - - 1 Kne Scribe, Paris. 

WHOLESALE grocers. 



Newton Booth, C. T. Wheeler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W. W. Dodoe, S. F 
W. W. D0D3E & CO., 
holesale Grocers, corner Front and Clay streets, San 

Francisco. April 1. 



w 



REMOVAL. 

L. H. Newton.] NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., [Morris Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Tens, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, have removed to 204 and 200' California btrcet, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. June 7. 



s 



TABER, HARKER & CO., 
nccessors to Phillips, Taber A* Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, 108 and 110 California street, below Front, San Francisco. April 15. 



A- S. ROSENBAUM & CO., 

Southeast corner or California and Battery streets, invite 
the attention of their customers and others to their lar^c assortment of the 
Best and Finest Brands of CHEWING and SMOKING TOBACCO, HAVANA CIGARS 
and CIGAR1TOS. Consignments of Choicest Brands of CiKars received hv every 
Steamer. [Oct. IS ] A. S. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

\ it- PItIXTS'31 

JSIiTJCE, -537 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

) BELOW MONTGOMERY. 



BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCCRRIE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 7 30 Montgomery street. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 



SAN" FRANCISCO. 



[Bfsy 24. 



CASTLE BROTHERS.— [Established, I860-} 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Xos. 213 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 



w 



PERSONS VISITING THE EAST 
ill Gnrt full flies or Pacific Coast papers and conve- 
niences for letter writing, etc., at Wells, Fargo & Co. 'a Ollice, 65 Broadway, 



P. H. CANAVAN, 

Real Estate, 521 Montgomery Street, 8. T- 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



THE QUEEN'S SPEECH. 
The speech delivered yesterday from the throne by Her Majesty- 
Queen Victoria, will be read to-day in many different tongues and by mil- 
lions of people. Not that it is of great moment because of the intrinsic 
importance of its utterances. It rather derives its value and significance 
from the fact that matters of State were at least satisfactory enough to 
call for no very grave announcements. The speech shows that nothing 
has heretofore been kept back, but that the people on the outside were 
about as well informed of what was taking place within as were the 
Cabinet officers themselves. That being so, there was no story left to 
tell. It is a good sign, read and understood by subjects of the Empire 
everywhere, when the speech from the throne is commonplace. It is evi- 
dence that nothing but commonplace topics remain to talk about. Of 
course the Russo-Turkish difficulty received prominent notice, but there 
was nothing to tell that the world did not already know. Lord Salisbury 
had been to Const intinople, had there taken part in a conference with 
the Plenipotentiaries of all the great Powers, had agreed to recommend 
certain reforms to Turkey, which that Power had refused to adopt, where- 
upon he returned. His mission was not a failure. He went to accom- 
plish two purposes. First, to prevent Russia from dismembering the 
Turkish Empire for her own gain; and secondly, to keep England out of . 
war. He succeeded in so mixing up things that both those ends were 
achieved. That was the whole story, with which the whole people were al- 
ready familiar. The proclamation at Delhi of the Queen's Indian title of Em- 
press was pleasantly alluded to. The papers to hand show that the occa- 
sion was a most brilliant one, hardly, perhaps, equaled by any pageantry 
of modern times. At the Governor- General's reception there was a moun- 
tain king, who had, for the first time, come within British territory. He 
said that the three things which most excited his admiration were rail- 
ways, steamships and telegraphs. We have not to go so far back in our 
own history to find ourselves at the same point as this great chieftain. It 
is to his advantage that all these things will be brought to him in a state 
of perfection. The Queen's commonplace speech will be an assurance to 
her subjects everywhere that no war, or other calamity, threatens to dis- 
turb that peaceful sway which best promotes the progress of railways, 
telegraphs and steamships. 

THE ELECTION OF JUDGE DAVIS AS A SENATOR. 
Judge Davis, a warm personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, has been 
elected to the United States Senate from Illinois. Perhaps the Demo- 
crats lose as much, or more, than they gain by this election. Had Judge 
Davis remained outside politics be would almost certainly have been 
chosen the fifth judicial member of the Compromise Commission, and in 
that case Tilden almost as certainly would have been declared the right- 
ful President. Judge Davis, however, will in every way be a gain to the 
Senate, especially as he succeeds so objectionable a man as Logan. He 
is, of course, a lawyer of high standing and character, and he has — 
what in these days is of importance — a large fortune. But then it must 
be said that something is also gained by having him leave the Supreme 
Court. Ever since he went on the bench he has had one eye turned 
towards politics, and at every Presidential election he has been talked of 
or urged as a candidate by some party or sect, a process which could not 
have gone on withoxit his knowledge or sanction. The mischief of any 
judge's occupying such a position has, of course, always been very plain ; 
but the reference of the present Presidential dispute to members of the 
Supreme Court emphasizes it in a remarkable degree. The Nation urges 
that when any attempt is made to provide regular machinery for the de- 
cision of these disputes by Constitutional Amendment, we trust a serious 
effort will be made to insert a provision making every man who takes a 
place on the Supreme Bench ineligible ever after for any political office, 
or, at all events, for four years after his resignation. Allowing the judges 
to canvass or intrigue for the Presidency, and for Senatorship and other 
elective offices, goes far to neutralize the provisions made for their inde- 
pendence in the life tenure and the prohibition of any reduction in their 
salaries during their continuance on the bench. 



■WALL STREET. 

Califoraians seem to have a peculiar faculty of turning up where 
ever there is a chance for a splurge or prominence. The late Presidential 
election has brought one or another of them into exalted notice in many 
different places. Wall street is the latest objective point to which their 
attention has been directed. Keene, who left California street because 
his health was not good enough to stand the excitement, has plunged into 
the New York whirlpool. The stories that come along the wires as to 
his doings are too inconsistent to furnish any reliable idea of what his 
exact course has been, but that he has taken a strong hand in the deal 
going on there is certain. Wall street, however, during the past two 
weeks, has been exercised by other interests which have more concern for 
the whole country. The Secretary of the Treasury, at the request of the 
Syndicate, issued a notice that the interest on 810,000,000 more six per 
cent. 5-20 bonds, known as the old Go's, will cease April 24th, when the 
bonds will be redeemed. This notice implies that the Syndicate have sold 
or have a market for 810,000,000 more of the uew 4A per cent, bonds. 
They had before marketed 800,000,000 of these bonds. "Partly as the re- 
sult of this notice of redemption, but more because of utterances of the 
President to the effect that the remaining $240,000,000 of U per cent, 
bonds can and will be sold as rapidly as they can be handled, and that 
specie payments can he resumed, in his opinion, eighteen days hence — 
that is, on the first of March — the price of gold expressed in paper cur- 
rency fell to 105i. The President, if correctly reported by the daily press 
of New York, has been " loaded" on the subject of specie payments in a 
way which has left him very much confused, and one paper fears that he 
has been made the victim of a practical joke. Be that as it may, it is 
certain that these financial movements are of grave national importance. 



Ex-Assessor Levi Rosener died at the Palace Hotel yesterday 
morning. The cause of his death was congestion of the lungs. For sev- 
eral years Mr. Rosener filled the office of Assessor of the city and 
county, being succeeded by Mr. A. Badlam, the present holder. Mr. 
Rosener was 3i5 years of age, and a member of the firm of Merrifield & 
Rosener, brewers. He was born in Pennsylvania and married only a 
few months ago in ISew York. His death is a bitter blow to his young 
wife and his many friends. The funeral will take place on Sunday, 
frum the residence of his brother, 904 O'Farrell street. 



GREECE LN TURKEY. 
The Russo-Turkish difficulty is prolific of curious historical inci- 
dents. For a time Servia and Russia were fast friends. The Servians 
looked to the great Bear of the North as their coming savior. But closer 
familiarty bred contempt, and now Lord Derby openiy declares in Parlia- 
ment that "Russia and Servia have become reciprocally disenchanted 
with each other," and we find Servia busily engaged in making peace on 
her own account with the Porte. Perhaps the mo4 curious incident is 
the changefin the relation between Greece and Russia. From the period 
of the Greek insurrection down to the Crimean war, Greece was the 
favorite protege of the Czar, and looked to Russia as the source of all 
good things, the bond at that time being a religious one. The Panslavic 
movement having substituted race for religion, the attitude of Greece has 
completely changed, and now the Greeks rather sympathize with the 
Turks against the Russians, and if they fight want to do so on the side of 
England. They are eager, indeed, to play some part in any trouble that 
may arise, and though their army at present only numbers 12,000 men, 
their Parliament has been passing some very belligerent measures— one 
providing for a levy of 200,000 men, another for an increase of taxes and 
the raising of a loan of 812,000,000, all for military purposes. We can 
hardly believe, however, that these formidable preparations will really be 
carried out. Bismarck, with his usual bluntness, suggested that the great 
Powers would doubtless wait and see what would happen when Russia 
and Turkey have fought a campaign or two. He was right. England 
evidently means to so wait. Germany ditto. Greece will necessarily be 
no exception to the rule. Russia sees the game, and evidently does not at 
present intend to place herself at the mercy of these waiters upon Provi- 
dence. 

TRYING LEGAL INDICTMENTS LN THE PRESS. 

It has been well pointed out by a daily contemporary that an infa- 
mous practice is growing up in this city of trying and determining cases 
by the press, that are still subjudicc. In England such a system would 
not be tolerated for a moment. During the celebrated Tichborne trial, 
reports slightly colored emanated from certain journals, only to meet 
with stern rebuke from the Judges and to bring down condign punish- 
ment upon the offenders. The Bulletin and Call have again and again 
tried, condemned and sentenced us for libels not more severe than they 
themselves published upon the same subject. Yet these self-same libels 
are matters remaining for judicial determination. In good time we shall 
meet them, and have no reason to fear the result. "We shall triumph, but 
the Bulletin will not even then take back its false and wicked judgment. 
It won't even print fairly the testimony by which we shall justify our- 
selves, and if it can avoid giving the verdict, if it can be one of acquittal, 
it will do so. Day by day it is busily engaged manufacturing public opin- 
ion, and that, too, whilst it knows that we are silenced upon the main 
issues by a monstrous and illegal injunction that will not hold together 
one moment after we can reach the Supreme Court, but which in the 
meantime is accomplishing its purpose by indirection and perversion of the 
law. This is not the fair, manly way of fighting which dispassionate 
onlookers like to see. But despite all that we are quite capable of hold- 
ing our own. It will doubtless be perceived that we give quite as good 
as they send. We can stand it if they can. 

THE GRAND JURY. 

The present Grand Jury, in and for the city and county of San Fran- 
cisco, has been in session but a short time, yet it has already accomplished 
a task that is usually left to the last, and then performed in haste and in 
indifference. It is one of the important duties of a Grand Jury to thor- 
oughly inquire into the management of the various public institutions of 
the city, and to report with firm integrity of purpose the result of their 
inquiries. No doubt previous Grand Juries fully intended to perfurm this 
duty up to the highest mark of its requirements, but the pressure of other 
business caused it to be left to the last, and hence it too often occurred 
that there was not time to make a searching investigation. The 
present Grand Jury has made a new departure by changing this practice. 
As early as 9 o'clock on Thursday morning they started out on this busi- 
ness, and have already visited the Alms House, Industrial School, House 
of Correction, City and County Hospital, Magdalen Asylum, the New 
City Hall, and the new Hall of Records. At none of the institutions 
was there any notification given of their intended visit, but they just 
dropped in, creating not a little surprise. Every institution was taken in 
its every-day attire, no opportunity being given to fix up things. The 
reports, therefore, from the present Grand Jury ought to be specially val- 
uable. The precedent thus established may be followed with advantage 

hereafter. 

NAMES WITHHELD. 

It is a new and disgraceful thing for the State Medical Society, 
which ought to be representative of a liberal profession, that they have 
permitted their Secretary to withhold from the public the names of those 
to whom licenses to practice medicine have been recently granted. It 
would seem as though the Society were ashamed of what they have done, 
and we shall not be surprised to find that our Quack List has been seri- 
ously curtailed by their efforts. Dr. Grover's duty is clearly pointed out 
in the Medical Act, which provides that all licenses granted by this Soci- 
ety shall be registered in the county record office, and that the public shall 
have free access to this record during proper hours. As Dr. Grover is 
thus permitted by the State Medical Society to trade upon the knowledge 
belonging to the public, it is only fair to suspect that he and his examin- 
ers have also traded upon the licenses they have been permitted to issue. 
We dare the Examiners to exhibit the examination papers, and in the 
name of the cheated pubbc we demand an immediate publication of the 
names of those who have received licenses and those who have been 
rejected. 

It is a truism that a fault of youth, if repented of and atoned for by a 
pure after life, ought to be allowed to sink into oblivion. But if the wick- 
edness be continued from youth to mature manhood, growing from bad to 
worse, surely it is not amiss to point out that as the twig was inclined so 
the tree grew up. 

There is at least one thing worse than libeling a rogue, and that is 
aiding him to cover up his tracks and get away quietly with his booty. 
Bulletin please copy. 




Postscript 




j > 



•*>1^e) : tte: 



r 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




Olllt'*— OOT to OU5 MoiM-linut Street. 



VOLUME £7. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 10, 18;7. 



NUMBER 3. 



BIZ. 



Iu commercial circles, the most important event of the week has 
been the rise in the price o! Sugar of \c per pound on all Yellow Groo i ■■ 
. and Jc per pound on all White Refined. This advance was not 
ther unexpected, and will be good Dews for the Sandwich Wanders, 
who boa look to this market almost exclusively for an outlet for their 
steadily increasing product. A contemporary takes up and discusses the 
i >n of Sugar Beet production upon the Pacific Slope, contending 
that not a pound of Beet Sugar hoe e< er be in produced on this coast to 
profit, quoting from a letter just received From the late secretary of the 
, t.i the effect that the establishment in that city is 
dow closed, and most likely will not resume work again, as it doa not 
i S Sugarie has also dosed it- season's work, the two com- 

', in 1876, making less than 1,000,000 pounds Beet Sugar. We may 
add to this that the Snquel Sugarie have resolved not to plant any Beets 
in 1876. The fact is that the Boil of California lias too much alkali in it 
Beets t>> good advantage. 
3318 contrary is probably true of Cotton raisin- in California. This 
staple can be raised to good advantage in Colusa, Kern and Merced coun- 
ties, and perhaps in Others, but in these the experiment ha- been success 

fully made. The only barrier found to be in the way is the want »»f a 
home market fur the Cotton. Ha«l we Cotton mills in the State to man- 
ufacture raw material, the business of raising it would he prosecuted with 
vigor. The staple is long, the fibre strong, and our Woolen mills prefer 
it L w 'hat little they -1" use) to the best Southern Cotton, and will pay a 
t"'-r tic home product. But when the Cotton raisers have to 
export their crops to Liverpool for a market.it don't pay, as they have 
learned by dear-bought experience. The freight- commissions and an end- 
less list of extraordinary expenses eat up the whole venture. This, we 
are credibly informed by a grower in California, is the result of his expe- 
rience in raising hundreds ol acres in this State, 

The weather is glorious since the January rains, and vegetation is 
now coming forward rapidly. Pasturage is now Bplendid for both cattle 

and Bheep, and the herdsmen are jubilant at the pro-specs before them of 
a heavy wool clip and a plentiful supply of fat cattle for the stall. The 
early planted Wheat and Barley is now up knee high, and in many large 
fields it has been deemed advisable to turn in the cattle to feed it down, 
which i= really an advantage to the growing grain. 

The plowman is busy night and day, running his furrows by lamp- 
tight, ami straining every nerve to plow and sow every acre that it ;s possi- 
ble to do while this warm, genial growing weather lasts. A fortnight's con- 
tinuance of this fine weather will enable our belated farmers to cultivate 

many thousand acres of virgin land, thus swelling the aggregate of culti- 
vated lands in the State beyond any former experiences. 

We are glad to see that our people are turning their attention more 
ami more to the manufacturing of Agricultural Implements upon this 
coast than heretofore. These large, bulky goods cost heavily for freight, 
be it by sea or rail from the East, thus adding greatly to their cost. This 
extra cost our people propose to save by erecting large factories at Sacra- 
mento and San Jose for the purpose. Success to them. 

Our people have already done something in the way of manufacturing 
Grain Sacks for the farmer. It is true we import the jute in its raw 
state from Manila, and at Oakland make every year souu> 3,000,(J00 
Bags therefrom. We also import Hessian piece goods from Dundee and 
Calcutta, and make therefrom in this city as many more Groin Sacks. 
Set f.u- all this we are compelled to import every year ten to fifteen mill- 
ions band sewed Bags, with which to export our Wheat and Barley, and 
besides we use mauy millions of Cotton Bags every year iu this State, 
with which to pack all our Flour, and though we have the soil to produce 
the Cotton, yet we have no cotton mills in the State, and have to go to 
New Eu-land and New York for all our Cotton Goods. This is not true 
economy. 

Mention ought here to be made of our half dozen or more Canning 
Establishments in this State for the putting up of Fruits, Vegetables, 
etc. Ibis branch of business is steadily and rapidly expanding, and our 
packers are now reaching out after paying' markets for the same. We 
now send fresh Peaches, Apricots, Cherries, Honey, etc., to London and 
Liverpool, Tomatoes, Apricots, etc., to New York, Philadelphia, etc., 
while the Territories and the boundless West draw heavily upon us for 
all son- i Jams. Jellies, Fruits, etc., and that in quantities. Oregon 
hopes t" n in 18T7 over 500,000 cases of Salmon. Half this quantity 
and mori as exported to Liverpool, etc., last year, wiih good results, 
and eve exertion is now heing made for an extended business in this 
line. Our sister State has also made a good beginning in putting up Beef 
in tins for he English market. 



Freights, —very little business has been done in Grain charters thus 
far in February, and Wheat freights to Liverpool are nominal at 62, and 
i he usual advance to * !ork or Falmouth for a market. We hai e some 26 
or more disengaged vessels in port of 28,500 tons registered capacity, be 
sides 20 vessels under engagement and now on the Liverpool berth to load 
\\ beat, Flour, etc., iu all this month. 

Wheat exports since July 1st to date aggregate nearly 9,000,000 ctle., 
\;ilu. J at Mil. '.'oil, (Hin, the same embracing 2-u cargoes dispatched to the 
I uited Kingdom iu about seven months time, against L34 vessels for the 
same time bust year, carrying 4,800,000 ctls. Wheat, valued at 511,000,000. 

The present price of Wheat is s-_'e, $2 1" |:'' ctl., which is quite a decline 
fram the highest point reached this Winter. 

Flour.— The ship Voyager has come down from Vallejo with the bulk 

of 10. U00 bbls. Starr Mills K\tra for Liverpool, and is to be followed 
speedily by the ship Tenby Castle with a full cargo of same. We note a 
sale to the Government of 1800 100 lb sacks National Mills Extra private. 
The Xealandia, for Australia, carried i>120 quarter sacks Golden Age, 
etc The price of Superfine is $5; Extra Superfine, $5 50@$6; Golden 
I rate, Starr Mills and Golden Age Silk-dressed Extras, si; 50(§ 7 I-' bbl. 

Barley. -There is a good healthy tone to the market, but at some de- 
cline from the highest rates ruling in January. Choice Bay brewing is 
very scarce at -SI 35 gold ; Coast Brewing, SI 25 gold; do., feed. !?1 20 H? 
ctl. The stock is large, but with a fair Eastern demand and a good local 
requirement we hope to see present rates sustained. 

Oats. —The chief supply now comes from Oregon ; price, $2(2 $2 25 {• 
cental. 

Hops. — The Australian steamer carried 0.122 lbs. There is at present 
an Eastern overland demand, with sales during the week of 00 bales 
Choice at 21c ; 32 Medium, ISc ; 28 Washington Territory at 10c. 

Hidea. —There is a good demand for Dry at 18c ; Wet, salted, 8@9c. 

Tallow. --There is a fair demand; sales, 100,000-lbs. for the week at 
iVV" iUe, according to quality and package. 

Wool . —The demand is at present light, and prices more or less nom- 
inal, say I0(q 12c for Burry and Earthy Southern, and 15(« 20c for clean 
Northern fleece. 

Oil-Cake Meal. —The mill price is now 832 ."'0 per ton less discount : 
Ground Barley, $29 per ton ; Corn Meal, feed, £30 per ton ; Bran, $16 ; 
Middlings, |27 50 ; Hay, $11@$16 per ton. 

Salmon. --Some 30,000 cases Oregon 1-lb tins have been sold on con- 
tract for summer delivery at a price equal to si 52^@$] 55 per dozen de- 
livered in this city. The Zealandia, for the Colonies, carried 2,0"i<) 
Oregon Salmon, chiefly 2-th cans ; price, $3. 

Coffee. —The market is firm for all Greens at 20(fij22c. Three car loads, 
450 bogs, have recently been sent to St. Louis. 

Sugar. —The market is strong at the rise of .'.c on Yellow. Jc I <' R on 
White. We now quote White Cube and Crushed, 13£@l3£c; Yellow 
Coffee, 94(3 Lie. 

Rice. --Stock large and the market sluggish at 5(5 Gc for China ; 6c for 
Hawaiian. 

Metals. — We have no sales of Pig Iron to record. Price, S30@34 for 
Scotch and English. The market for all goods in the line sluggish. 

Coal. —There is a good demand for Wallsend, at S9; Scotch and 
and English Steam, $8@8 oil ; Seattle, $8; Anthracite, S15. 

Borax. -- The spot market is sluggish, yet free shipments have recently 
been made to New York, the ship Orient carrying 20 tons, and the Gran- 
ada, via Panama to same, 570,000 lbs. Prices as heretofore, Gc for crude, 
7c for concentrated, 9£@9fc for refined. 

Spirits --The Government has been unsuccessful in all their suits of 
late, the claimants coming out with clean hands; yet, with all this in their 
favor, distillers in Nebraska and Illinois continue to send us large sup- 
plies of Spirits, which they sell here for less than it actually costs to make 
it. Hence it is that our "distillers are crippled, and run only half their 
capacity. 

Salt.— A sale is reported of 1,000 ba^s Marshal's Liverpool Stoved, ex 
Patterdale, private— supposed to be $20. It is said that the Carmen 
Island Company are intending to import more laigely of Mexican this 
Spring than usual. 

Wines.-- Our exports of Native in January amounted to 31,000 galls 
and 624 cases, valued at $21,880. The ship Orient, for New York, car- 
ried 42,727 galls and 240 cases. Thus it is that our Native product is 
gradually bein- uniolded, and will in time be of vast importance to this 
coast. The exceeding excellence of Kohler & Frohling's Old Port, Sherry, 
Hock, etc.. and Isaac Landsberger's Sparkling Eclipse, commend them- 
selves to all. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



CONDENSED NEWS OF THE WEEK. 

LOCAL. 

Saturday, February 3d —Mayor Bryant has announced that nn and 
after the 1st of March he will revoke all special permits to maintain 
signs, fruit stands, etc., on the puhlic sde walks.— Frank Hamilton, the 
veteran thief, was held to answer on c\ a"ges of burglary and grand lar- 
ceny in the Police Court, with bail stt at S3, 000 in each case.— The 
fumigation of the sewei-s was commenc d yesterday under the direction of 
the Health Officer. The sewers were found to be in an extremely un- 
filthy condition and almost entirely choked up. ^— -The charges preferred 
by Frank G. Edwards against William Shew having been inquired into by 
the California Ri8e Association, have been dismissed. 

Sunday, 4ttL —Baron Scblippenbach, of the Imperial Russian Navy, 
is at the Palace Hotel.— Ex-Governor Pacheco took Senor Yglesias 
and staff on a junketing tour outside the heads in his yacht Consuelo.— — 
Benjamin H. Josselyn was arrested on complaint of Dr. Grover, who 
charges him with a violation of the law regulating the practice of medi- 
cine. It is alleged that he has been practicing medicine without a certifi- 
cate as required by law.— Hon. Schuyler Colfax has accepted an invita- 
tion to deliver his celebrated lecture on "Abraham Lincoln, ' iu this city, 
in the Spring. The proceeds will be given to the Odd Fellows* Library 
fund. 

Monday, 5th. —The crusade against driving over crossings has had a 
noticeably good result, and the streets are much safer for pedestrians 
than formerly.— Judge Daingerfield appointed a Committee to draw up- 
resolutions of respect to the memory of the late General John Wilson. 
— Alonzo W. Carll was granted a divorce, by Judge Morrison, from 
Susie W. Carll, on the ground of willful desertion.— Judge Wheeler 
dismissed the suit of Nicholas Luning vs. Alexander Austin for want of 
prosecution.— —The amount of Customs dues paid at this port last week 
was $122,271. 

Tuesday, 6th. —Judge Louderback has ordered Bailey, the assumed 
proprietor of the Belden Place gambling house, to cover his 8500 bail 
already up, or furnish an acceptable bond in 82,000.— —An intoxicated 
man named Charles Peters fell on Sacramento street, near Dupont, and 
cut his head badly by contact with the curbstone. He was taken to the 
City Prison Hospital. —Housebreaking is alarmingly on the increase in 
the Western Addition.— The Verein Eintracht will give a masked ball 
on Thursday evening, February 22d. 

Wednesday, 7th. -The divorce suit of Cardiff vs. Cardiff has been 
referred to the Nineteenth District Court Commissioner.— The amount 
of import duties paid at this port last month was $577,500 against $579,- 
400 in January, 1876,-^— Judge Dwindle has dismissed the case of Frank 
Cornitz against L. Peiser for want of prosecution. --'The bark William 
H. Basse, regarding whose safety some fears were felt, has arrived at Vic- 
toria all right. — Judge Daingerfield has granted Raphael Boradori a 
divorce from Josephine Boradori on the ground of adultery. 

Thursday, 8th.— The examination of N. V. C. Den, on a charge of 
embezzlement was finished in the Police Court yesterday, and resulted in 
the discharge of the accused. The needles and "gift-distribution 11 
swindle is being extensively advertised by small handbills scattered over 
the city. No intelligent person will be taken in by it.— Apoplexy was 
the cause of death in the case of the Frenchman Paul Reni, who died at 
No. 5 Polk Lane, and also in that of Charles Jaeger, head waiter of the 
Philadelphia House.— Owen Hickey, a boilermaker, has been sent by 
the Commissioners of Lunacy to the Home of the Inebriate for a few 
days. Robert Powers, a carpenter, was also sent to the Home. 

Friday, 9th.--St. Alban's Literary Society will give an entertainment 
at German Hall on February 16th.— ^A -Chinese tan game on Dupont 
street was raided and 11 gamblers arrested.^— The Assistant City and 
County Attorney has in hand for collection 492 street assessments, aggre- 
gating §867,474, upon which there is due §80,607. There are now 1,278 
assessment suits pending.— -Jerry Jones and John and Theodore Cash- 
man are under arrest on charges of assault to murder, preferred by Win. 
Alexander. James Garrity is also charged with threats against his life. 
The difficulty grew out of land troubles. 



TELEGRAPHIC. 

Saturday, February 3d. — It is learned that Governor W T ells will 
testify that two prominent and wealthy New Orleans gentlemen offered 
him a heavy bribe to count the State for Tilden. He rejected their offer 
and promised secrecy. Maddox was to-day removed from his position 
as Agent of the Internal Revenue Bureau. The removal was determined 
upon by the President yesterday, and he consequently sent for Colonel 
Chamberlain, now of Virginia, and formerly an officer of the regular 
army, and tendered the place to him. ^— The span of the T. W. & W. 
R. R. bridge, 150 feet in lemrth, which crosses the Wabash at Logans- 
port, Iud., was entirely carried away this morning by heavy floating ice. 
The bridge was being rebuilt of iron. # A portion of the irou for the new 
bridge was also swept away. 

Sunday, 4th. -- Unemployed working men in New York in mass- 
meeting to-night call upon the Legislature for an appropriation of $2,000,- 
000, to give work to 55,000 idle men in that city. ^— The Secretary of the 
Treasury says he has sufficient silver to meet the legitimate demands, and 
declines to reexchange U. S. notes for silver brought to the Department 

in sums varying from ten to five hundred dollars. -The Yale University 

Boat Club has voted not to accept the challenge of Cornell to row the 
winner of the eight-oared race between Harvard and Yale.— A fire at 
Memphis, in Veccars & Co's wholesale liquor store, on Front street, last 
night, damaged the stock and building -$40,000; insured. 

Monday, 5th. — Charles O'Conor, in company with Secretary Fish, 
called upon President Grant, and was received by him with cordiality 
and with expressions of congratulation on Mr. O'Conor's extraordinary 
recovery from his dangerous illness. — The Senate Military Affairs Com- 
mittee have agreed to recommend the passage of the bill urged by the 
Oregon Senators and approved by the Interior Department, providing for 
the appraisement and sale of the Dalles Military Reservation to the high- 
est bidders, at not less than -SI 25 per acre. ^— The Silver Commission, of 



which Senator Jones is Chairman, will probably make their report in ten 
days. The report will undoubtedly be the most valuable document on 
the silver question that has been published. 

Tuesday, 6th. --D. E. Barrett, attendant in the Northampton Asy- 
lum, Mass., was murdered by a lunatic.— The total amount of appro- 
priations in the River and Harbor bill is 82,275,800.-^ A lawyer of New 
York has received a letter from a friend on the Inman steamship City of 
Richmond, stating that James Gordon Bennett and his party were among 
his companions on the voyage to Europe.— In the Senate yesterday, at 
Springfield, the House resolution requesting Congress to remonetize silver- 
coin was unanimously concurred in. - T 3y the caving of an iron mine 
near Allentown, Pa., yesterday, three men were killed and three severely 
wounded. 

Wednesday, 7th. -- The bill to amend the Pacific Railroad Acts so a i 
to create a sinking fund for the liquidation of the indebtedness due the 
Government by the Pacific Railroads, was taken up. — The House Ways 
and Means Committee to-day heird arguments urging the repeal of all 
Federal taxation on circulating deposits and capital of banks.— —The 
Silver Commission held a session, at which Henri Carnuchi, the eminent 
French writer on financial subjects, gave an extended expression of his 
views concerning the relative values of gold and silver and the advisability 
of establishing bimetallic standards. 

Thursday, 8th. — Sheridan Shook has forwarded to the treasurer of 
the fund for the relief of the B ooklyn Theater sufferers 810,000, seventy- 
five per cent, of the sum realized by the benefits at theaters in that city. 
The remainder of the money will be divided between the families of Mur- 
doch and Burroughs.— -The Chicago, Danville and Vincennes Railroad 
was sold at public auction yesterday, under decree of foreclosure in favor 
of the first bondholders. The price paid was 81,450,000. The purchasers 
ware a committee appointed by the New York bondholders. The entire 
indebtedness of the road is 87.500,000.-^— Peryear & Co's racing stable 
has been sold to settle the estate of David Crawford, deceased. Nineteen 
horses were sold for 89,000, the stallion "Narraganset " bringing §1,000. 
— —Rear Admiral Wildes died this morning. 

Friday, 9th. — Keene, Park, Rufus Hatch and others were in the re- 
cent pool operating for a rise in Western Union, Keene taking 20,000 
shares. There was no bad faith among the operators. There were 
differences of opinion, and they agreed to dissolve. Park promptly sold 
out. Hatch and others hold, confident that it is a good speculation.— 
The citizens' reception and ball given to the General Assembly and State 
officers to-night, at Columbus, O., was a large and brilliant affair. Gov- 
ernor and Mrs. Hayes were present. -^In the case of James Harrington, 
sentenced to be hanged at Virginia City, Nev., a stay of proceedings has 
been granted by the Supreme Court. The execution was to have taken 
place to-day. 

FOREIGN. 

Saturday, February 3d.-- It is asserted that the Prince of Monte- 
negro telegraphed that it was impossible for him to entertain direct nego- 
tions for peace, as his subjects would dethrone him if he did. ^— The 
Porte has sent a dispatch to its representatives abroad giving notice of 
the appointment of three Christians to governorships of provinces, and 
declaring that the application of reforms is proceeding unremittingly.-^ 
The Public Prosecutor at Berlin has instituted proceedings against the 
son of Count Von Arnim, on account of offensive newspaper articles.-^— 
The severe sentence passed on the Droits del'Homme is creating great ex- 
citement in French parliamentary circles. 

Sunday, 4th. — The result of the German elections are deeply discour- 
aging to the supporters of the Empire. Bismarck will still be able to 
command the majority by skillful maneuvering, but his successors may 
be unable to control the social forces, which have acquired such dangerous 
intensity.— At the annual meeting of the Sheffield Chamber of Com- 
merce, the President said Sheffield manufacturers and workmen had only 
themselves to blame for the loss of trade with America, and successful 
American competition with foreign countries. Sheffield workmen had 
not come up to the make and style required by their customers.— The 
Government at Bogota has condemned the acts of General Pera, bul 
iug to his popularity and influence in that region it was found impractica- 
ble to remove him from his command. There were no foreigners killed 
in the massacre, but their property has been confiscated in the most 
shameful manner. 

Monday, 5th.-- If peace is not made with Servia before March, con- 
verging columns will march on Krajuvatz, the former capital, and call to- 
gether the Servian Assembly there, which shall overturn the present Gov- 
ernment and make a satisfactory treaty with the Porte.— Prince Gort- 
schakoff considers that Europe, by its united diplomatic action, has proved 
that it is deeply interested in the maintenance of peace in the East, and 
that it is recognized to be its duty as well as its right to co-operate for 
that end on behalf of the general interest.— Gortschakoff's circular will 
not lessen the distrust with which Russia is viewed in England. It will 
be regarded as an invitation to begin a war from wdiicb, if Turkey has no 
allies, Russia would certainly profit. -^The Prince of Montenegro ac- 
cepts the proposals of the Grand Vizier to open peace negotiations, and 
will treat directly with the Porte. 

Tuesday, 6th.-- It is said that a formidable Russian ironclad squadron 
will enter the Mediterranean in the Spring. The Grand Duke Constan- 
tine will command, and Admiral Popoff will be his chief of staff. — The 
Turkish Ambassador in Rome has notified the Porte that arms for Crete 
are being purchased in Italy. The Turkish garrisons iu the island have 
consequently been strengthened. — E. H. Charles Lonais, proprietor of 
the Dominion Foundry in Montreal, has made an assignment. Liabili- 
ties estimated at 8100,000; assets large.— The worst apprehensions are 
felt of a strike of the Denham colliers, in consequence of differences with 
masters about the recent arbitration awards. A strike would directly af- 
fect from 30,000 to 40,000 men, and involve the stoppage of the Cleveland 
iron industry. 

Wednesday, 7th. — The British man-of-war Bittern, which was about 
to quit Constantinople, has been detained, by order of the English Charge 
<T Affairs, for the protection of foreign residents. ——A prospectus is pub- 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE 8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



■ booth for UK- 
I'll.' boiiiln nrv t.. be pi rdaro. Berlin, 

, Antwerp and B \ of the Mm 

ac i iporta of 
the liiit.-i St.it- -. which formerl] offei 
iw nil, an. I there i 
r thrice manufactured in America,— -The English Court "f 
ikt U\- .ittiriD'.l tin- .!<■. i-i-'ii of tin- Hudriertfield magistrate, eon 
Dr. M-'U'k. tin- npiritualiRt medium, under ' 
ii,- him t<> tin iment 

Thursday, 8th--- Tit-- session --f t >»«■ British Parliament for 1*77 was 

lii.- Prince and Princess of Wales 

1 i ave reached Belgrade <-t great mUitarj 

itv along the Black Sea and the Pruth. the Russians having placed pon- 
river.— —It is believed Euidhat Pasha still really controls 
tin- Turkish Government, and only retired temporarily t>> permit 

—All hut three of t!i<- students who, on St. Nicholas' 'lav - , during 

le a demonstration and unfurled 

i» red flag, bearing tin- inscription, Union ami Liberty," have been sen- 

nr transportation. " The British : 
bound from Bullaoa t-> Newport, Wales, wont ashore at Lundy [aland, 
and became a t"t.il wreck, nineteen persona were drowned. 
Friday. 9th. — A socialist demonstration lias just been made in I 

■ i demand relief from taxation and assistance for a large Dumber 

n* unemployed, who wish to found a colony in Russian America. 

he Saghalien I slain Is lias failed. The -a tilers 

I great privations, ami ask permisiion t>> return.— Tt R 

Bankruptcy has decided in favor of the CFnii an ap- 

m the decision of tn-- Trustee in the liquidation case of Clews, 

Tliis decision will enable tin- United States to prove a 

which the Trustee rejected, on the ground that it was due 

from the New York house. " In tin- Bouse of Commons, the Marquis 

■i Partington pointed out I rence bo the American 

E :'i"ii treatv in tli-' Queen's speech. He also criticized the Marl of 

The American ship CorneU t which arrived at Q 

town January 5th, bom San Francisco, has been ordered t>> Hull. 

LIES OF THE DAY. 

A Ii-- hat ii" legs, «"■! cannot sUnil ; but it has winjts, and can fly f.ir ami vvulv.— 

tools, but ii li>- is i be handle 
which ti Lord B icqiiasi. AUeb ■■■■<: lie most be ttaatobed 

her, or it «ill soon rain through.— Loan Tbuiilowk. 

"And the sal week, nnd ho said likewise. 

Time a lie wllicb n ball" a In? in »»v.t the blackest of lies; 

That a lie tbat isaJI a lie may be no- 1 ami fought with outright, 

Itut a lie which ll part a truth is a harder mat lor to ii :ln — Ti NNTSOH. 



San Francisco Lies.— It is not true that our San Francisco belles 
have the finest complexions in the world.— —That Jim Steele, the drug- 
gist, is largely accountable for them- ' T hat the lunch fiends at Piatt's 
Hall have done yeoman service for the benefit of St. Luke's Hospital 
That the arrangements, as also the gourmands, were thoroughly 
.-—That Satan is laying in wait for Moody and Sankey in San 
■ co. Thai the odds are largely in favor of S.^— That the Rev. 

Hemphill includes in his Protestant Orphan Asylum prayers a fulsome 
financi d report of the Association. That the Lord takes it as read and 
U accordingly.-^— That Helen is very prolific, and there is a great 
id for " Helen's babies.*'— That Helen may be as fair as her name- 
I ["toy, but scarcely as chaste aa Diana. '-That two ambitious police- 
ire contending for the honors of the arrest of the Tivoliladies.— ^ 
That the " honors are easy, "and if the distinguished officers themselves are 

Eermitted to take a rent both sides will he even.— That the Christians 
ave this week converted three barbarians— to sausage meat.— That the 
AfatTssporting editor regards the sanctumas holy ground, and, like Moses of 
old. takesoff bis sandals on entering.— -That it will be welcome news for 
alike Reese on his return to know that the Grand Hotel is daily distributing 
its broken victuals among the virtuous ponr.^^Tbat we object to "come 
an I see the mammoth whale open night and day at the Dashaway Hall." 
That not being Jonahs, we decline t<> do the inside whale business.-^— 
That Supervisor Strother won't be bulldozed, being already over-dozed 

with bovine accomplishments. That he is too bully a boy to stand any 

:ims- of the kind. —That the circulation of the Mail is largely in 
if their modest statement.— That overtures have been made to the 
CaWt circulation affidavitist to put the matter right.— —That we have also 
I this expert to edit our "Lies of the Day."— That Dr. Toland, 
alter introducing to this State a more than fair proportion of bipeds, is 
now increasing and multiplying quadrupeds in the way of Shetland 
I ies -price $100 to $160 each.— —That Toland Medical College did pro- 
duce some other members of the equine family, several of which have 
become obnoxious to our citizens by their immense power of braying, with 
correspondingly long ears. 

Oakland Lies— It is not true that a prominent merchant of Alameda 
bad an altercation with the cars on descending.-— That the cars were 
inebriated and abusive aud had to be separated to save personal trouble. 
^— That a recent aristocratic wedding was, as asserted by the Bulletin, 
attended by the " ton " of society.— -That the average weight of the 
particeps crimi nta did not exceed 250 at the outside.— That the reform- 
atory exercises of our prisoners are largely composed of lively poker and 
belligerent crihbage boards. 

British Columbia Lies. -It is not true that Dave Higgina was burnt in 
effigy.— —That David will disappoint his friends if he is not burnt in 
another pl;Ke.— — That Storey, the undertaker, is in league with the pro- 
prietor of " Boyd's Blend. "^— That there are countless patriots anxious 
to immolate themselves fur their country's good as Cabinet Ministers for 
the paltry consideration of 84,000 a year. 

It is a truism that a fault of youth, if repented of and atoned for by a 
pure after life, ought to be allowed to sink into oblivion. But if the wick- 
edness be continued from youth to mature manhood, growing from bad to 
worse, surely it is not amiss to point out that as the twig was inclined so 
the tree grew up. 



CRADLE. ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



CRADLE 

Ubert w Allen,a dau 

; . to of J. U I 

■ in.in 4, lo the wife i r I ft, a daughter 

of A. I ■■><<<• . Ji . 
io wife of M.I tor. 

■ 
How viii' Iii UiU i 

in.. ..in- [d this city, Pel 

JtHl tXNSRK— ] ....... i i 

K i ■ atari :-, i" tli, 

i ■ i to the wife of G, v i.., .. 

i February 0, to the wife of 0, m Ledei i 

Mi iM'iiy in tin ■■. i fhtar, 

Uadsbh iii this city, February I, to the wifo of O Mad i 
\i v m. in ■ ■ i ■ ■ u urj ■■ to 'in wlti ■ i m Ub ■-. .» §on. 

\ mii is i , Pi bruarj i . to thi w ife ol I N ith in, a d lu fhter, 

l'v u in s. hi , in i, February S, to the wife "t l»r. P. L Paulle 
In this city, Pebraary 4, to thi wifeofM Bchmitt, i 
in ti.i- city, Pebruarj i, to thi wife of J W lamm, s daughter. 
i , this city, February ■_'. (■> the wife • >( ll Weber, ads 
Waiiknkr- in this rit>, February 6, to the wife ol F. 0. w sgeni r, a son. 

ALTAR. 

ESllis-Hibisllb in this city. February 7, Frank n. Bills to Jennie MJbielle. 
Qoi ld '>iui in thlfi city, Pobruary 7. 0. B. Qould to Mary Orr. 
ESabrmbss-McOamts in ihi> .it \ . February 6, F M. Harlcnoss to Emma D, U 
.i uii ---Willi i^ In this city, Januar) 24, Capt H. James to Haffcio E. ffil 
i i (ViLLUue [nthlacity, February 5, L i>. Lake to Jennie Wlmanu 
McDonald-Haddock Id this city, Kcl.rmir.v4, N. T. McDonald to E. EJEadd ■ I 
McMabtbbs-MoN m-v Inthlscitv, February 7. c McMasti re to it. McNapsy. 
NawjiAs-Fsisi cd In this city, February >■ |: - Newman to F. Foiniucl . 
i: ■ Smitii in this city, Jaouarj 31, Capt. T M Rogers to W. V. Smith. 

Bi Cuafbl lu this city, February 4, James Smith i" Marj Chapel 

Wbrtitsimer si i: U3SBR -In this city. February 4, W. Wertbeimcr u< F, Strasser. 
VTates-Blascuard— In Oakland, Pcbniarj l, k It, fates to Mrs. H. T, Qlanchard 

TOMF. 

Ali.hn lu this city, February ."-, Eliza Allen, aged 06 | 
Aldbn— in tlii- city, February 6, Jainea Allien, U, s. .\., aged 66 years. 
Bdrns in this city, February -".. James J. Burns, age I 23 j ears, 
Cotiv— In Redwood Citj , February -i. Gusaie Cory, aged 21 years, 
Doylk— In this city, February 4, Bridget Doyle, aged 17 years. 
I'li;i itv -In thi city, February ii.<;ij.t. Jean Fleury, aged 76 years. 
Goad— In t'lis city, February ■•, Ellen F. Goad, aged 26 year 
Hall— In this city, February 7, Edward Hall, aged 47 years, 
Kahn— In this city, February 6, Therase Kahn, aged S] years 
Lbadhbb — 1 1 this city, February 6, Solomon \ . Leadner, aged 7.'. years. 
Mokoan' — In this city, Februarj 6, Sarah a. Morgan, aged 37 years. 
I'EitKMAN.s— In this city, February 5, Catherine Peremans, aged 42 years. 

Ryan— In thia city, Februnry :i. Sarah Ryan, a^vil 4.". years. 

Stuffs -In this city. Februarj .'-. Ostils Stuppe, aged 47 years. 
Slosb In this city. February 6, Emma Sloss, aged 36 years. 
TSWKSBDRV— In this city, February 4, Jacob M. Tcwksbtiry, aged 02 years. 
\\ i B1 n.iiK— In this city, February 7, Carl Wusthofl, aged 39 years. 



Q0ACKS, BEWARE ] 




Any person practicing medicine or surgery in this State without a 

license, as required by the Medical Act, shall be punished by a fine of not 
less than $50 nor more than S500, or by imprisonment in the County Jail 
for ;i period of not less than 30 days nor more than 365 days, 0T by both 
such tine and imprisonment for each and every offence. [Medical Act, 
Section 13.] Any person shall be regarded as practicing medicine who 
shall profess publicly to be a physician and prescribe for the sick, or who 
shall append to his name the letters M. D. [Medical Act, Section 11.] 
Henceforth the public will find in our quack list those only who, if they 
continue to practice medicine or attach M. D. to their names, are liable 
to fine and imprisonment under the foregoing sections of the Medical Act. 
These persons are hereby warned to take down their signs, to close their 
offices, and cease their deadly practices. We hereby invito the co-opera- 
tion of the public to convict such persons, and to punish them according 
to the law. 

Pick and the Deacon's libel suit is already becoming the subject of 
many and interestiug discussions. General opinion, however, all points 
in the same direction, the only conflicting points being the actual and 
re] iuted' value of the characters which, they claim, have been so wantonly 
destroyed. It is being generally whispered that evidence will be 
forthcoming, by unimpeachable witnesses, that the amount of damages 
claimed is largely in excess of the actual market value of the characters, 
and that commodities of that description are, as a rule, perfectly unsale- 
able. Others, again, distinctly aver that they were not previously aware 
that the parties in question had a character at all, thougn the Deacon, it 
is believed, has secured the services of a Gospel dispenser in the city who 
has promised for a consideration to report most favorably on his sanctity. 
At all events, they have laid themselves open to a very serious charge. 
To claim $5,000 for an article not worth as many cents is a species of vil- 
lainy of which they only could be guilty ; whilst, on the other hand, to 
claim that amount for something that does not and never did exist, can 
come under no other head than that of obtaining money under false pre- 
tenses ! Out of the frying pan into the fire ! The best course would have 
been to have remained silent, and not to have published to the world any 
more about themselves than the public already knew ! 



There is at least one thing worse than libeling a rogue, and that is 
aiding him to cover up his tracks and get away quietly with his booty. 
BuHi'tin please copy. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 10, 1877. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

.Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for the 
Week ending February 8, 1877. 

Compiled from the Records of the Mercantile Agency of John McKillop ilk Co., 
401 California Street, San Francisco. 



Friday, February Zd 



GHANTOU AND GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



8 V mi Abb'd in Benj nail 

Jane Mclpy to Thos I Bergen 

Geo Ellis to Caleb Bnrbank 

H F A Schnssler lo Geo Edwards . 
City mid Co S F to Jhs Dexter.... 
Hush VVliitlfctl to A BMagrrire.... 

T W Voll toJRHamilton... 

J McDonongh to M Cunningham . 
Geo Kennedy to E F Woodhull... 
S and L Soc'y to Jno Mc Adams . . 
E H Cnrdinei to R KPuttridge.... 
Wm Dnmpby to Jno Wagner 



Lot 14. bile 28, S V Hd 

Nw Hai-ht nnd Octavia, 68:9x137:0 

E Mission, 210 f 17th, s 75, etc 

S Clipper, KiO e Diamond, 160x114 

Nw Tt nnesaee and Bnfte, 100x100 

W Mission, 185 n 19th, 25x80 

N Post, 137:6 w Buchanan, 27:15x137:0 .. 

E Church, 156 e 21sr, 26x135 

S Clay, 27:0 e Broderick, 47:0x100 

S 29th, SO w Church, 25x114 

Ne Lombard and Taylor, e 137:6, etc 

Lot 1, blk 57, Butchers' Tract 



J Mcf 

Louis 


Sloss to E K LIHentl 


1 Lot 

nl IN C 


-III:; unci 1" 
al'a, 87:6 w 


. Gift 
Franl 


Map4 1 I 

liD, 50x127:0 1 i 






Saturday, 


February 


3d. 





tfargM J Bralj to Thos Knight.. 
L 8 Wu:ton to Amy \V Vfci Mebr, 



Ne Tyler and Leav'th, 137:6x137:6... 
I' ml i — t • so acres, known as the Welton 

& Horslall T'ct, excepting 50 v 1 and 6 

blk 275, and 50 v 1 in hlk 230, W A ... 
SametoWmHale L'nd 8-9 -ame t'ct, except 50-vara 1 nnd 

6, blk 275. WA 

Same t'ct, except 50-v 2, blk 197, W A 
W Broderick. sit s of n I 50-v 1 in bik 

500, W A, 70:9x60:9 

W Broderick, at intersection of n 1 50 v 

1, W A 500, w 137:0, etc 

Ne Fillmore and Waller, 137:6x537:6.... 

W Mission, 390 s 22d, 30x125 

N Geary, 77: 1 w Octavia, 25:10x120 

Ne Downey, 1S1 se Bryant, 36x80, snbj'l 

to mortgage 

Sw Larkin iind Green, s 126, etc, subj'r 

to mortgage lor *io,o00" 

Sw Pine and Pierce, 275x137:6 

N nth, 100 w Church, 220x85. 



Amy W Vol Mebr to same 

Henry Wilson to John Mile .. 



J Mile toll Wilson. 



ChaP D Olds to TL Elliott.., 
Wm Wyune to Jae Rowland. 
Geo R Starr to Louis Mendel, 
S Goldberg to Jno Henley... 

Stephen Otis to Thos Price.. 



City and Co S F to Jas Mee, 
M Lynch to T M JDehon... 

ThosDorland to same IN 17th, 160 w Church, 220x3 

T M J Dehon to F McOanney N 17th, 230 e Sanchez, 25x82 

Jas Mee to City and Co S F Streets and highways 

S A Woodbury to Q W Phelps lb* acres, com at ne cor of sw Jtf of sect 2. 

I t 2 s, r5w, th s 5 ch.etc 



1 

5 

part'n 

part'n 
100 

3.100 
6,600 

1,650 

11,000 
.... 

1 

1,150 

1 



Monday, February 5th. 



F Thompson to Wm Klecman . . 

DMonagban io Peter Shiel 

A D Marcband to M L Marehaud 
S Cailaghan to John D Collins.. 



Thos Fallon to T E Beans INw 3d and Minna, n 75x75; nw Montg'y| 

and Sutter, 34:4Jix60, and property in 
other counties in trust 

Nw Masonic avand Frederick, 100x186:3 

N Pine, 82:0 e Baker. 22:0x137:0 

N Hush. 121:3 w Webster, 50x127:6 

Ne 15lh and Noe, 30x105; nlso, n 15th, 80 
e Noe, e 100, etc ; also, s Henrv, 1U5 e 
Noe, 75x115, stibj to mort $2,000 

Sw Washn av, 137 6 nw Hovv'd. 55x113:4 

Sundry lots in S S F H'd and R It As'n. 

Se Winters 1 Lane and Mason st, 69x21.. 

|W Steiner, 27:0 n Oek, 55x110 

I Lot 45, blk 042, Pt Loboa AvH'd 

iSame ' 

N Bush, 111:7 e VV.bsu-r, 22:11x137:0.. . . 



E R narri? lo Wm II Warden ... 
E -J Minium to Mary L Griffith .. 
Wm E Mclnlyre to Ann Mclntyre 

Emma Hayes to Mary Hayes 

A V Sprn&UB to Jno W Nye 

Jno W Nye to Jno F Byxbee 

J C Weir to Cims Ranfman 



J H Van Reek to H Degroot . . 
(i McWil iams to Bernard Sloan.. 
Edw Norton to P A McDonald — 
City and Co S F to Geo Mearns.. 

Geo Mearns to Rob't .Murdoch 

Rob't Murdoch to Jno Mullany... 

Geo Hearst to B J Shay 

BJ Shay to Jno Multany 

M Houdley to same , 



W Weal 38th st, 375 n D. 25x120 . 

W Tehama, 775 n Prospect PI, 25x80... 

Se Fo'som, 95 sw 41 h, 40x90 

|Nw Baker and Jackson, n 22l:0>i, etc 

s Jackson, 2:3 w Baker, s 50, eic 

N Jackson, 17:2 e Lyon, li 49:0, eic: also 

n Geary,6S:9 w Baker, 68:9x137:6... 

S Jackson, 25:0 e Lyon, e 387, etc 

Sw Jackson and Biker, w 3, s 57. ere 
Sw Jackson and Baker, w 8, s 59, etc. 
Se Jackson and Lyon, e 25:0, etc 



$3,500 
'750 



ie,ooo 

0,51X1 

2,000 

5 

1 

300 

400 

5,750 

200 

400 

11,100 



5,000 

2.7^0 

120 

750 

8,000 



Tuesday, February 6th. 



Jno I> Frost to CT Pearson ..., 

W S and T Co to same 

J O'Mahonev to P Abeam 

J D Hooker toCCRohlffs 

C C Roh Ift's to P K Genereaux.. 
A Morgenstern to B J Shay 

Wm Hollls to N D Arnot 

N D Arnot to Amanda Arnot .. 
Eugene DaUoo to MaryDalton., 

Thns Maece to Jas Wall 

Andrew Btrrell to C T Pearson., 



s and L Soc'y to Jno Furlong 
Eclw Norton io A II Wilcox... 
Same to Benj M Harthorne 



O F Von Rhein to Jno Greenwood 
Marg't Dunn to C L Dinglcy 



Rosa Whitney to same 

Chae H Burton toE Cleveland ... 



Wm Hollls to A Weinshenk , 

Jno Pforr to Mich'l J Crowley 

T E Beans to Carmcl Fallon 

H K Clarke to C G Hooker , 

C G Hooker to W Dodge 

Jos Hamilton to Mathew Barry 

Wm Hollis to A M Goldsmith ... 
S P O'Counor to John II Tumey. 
II FlenikeO to A P Wiley ...... . 

Terminus H As'n to S S Eckfeldt 



S Ore-on. 75 w Davis, 44x05 

Same 

E Mission, 275 n 17lb, 25x105 

S Fulton, 60 w Webster, 22:0x137:0 
W Websfr, 114:6 s Fulton, 23x82:6 
N 24tb, 253:7 w Sanchez, 158:8x114 
N Liberty, 110 w Valencia, 50x115. 

Same 

N Washington, 103:1# <" Broderick, e 

31:4' t ;xt27:8K 

N b'i^'g, SO w Church, 20:8x114 

Se $th, 250 tt se cor 4th and Bryant, se 

25, no 119, nw 80, etc 

S Day, 155 w Chinch, 25x11 1 

Nw Howard, 45:10 ne Spear, 05:10x137:6 
Nw Silver av, 2:10 ne fr se cor ol College 

ll'il, nw 937, Be 21.7. etc 

\V San Jose a v, 30 s 24th. 55x90 

No Fremont, 85:0 nw Harrison, nw 25, 

ne 77:6, n w 27, etc 

I Same 

iNe Fulton and Webeter, 137:6x137:6; also 
1 s Tyler, 137:0 w Steiner, 137:0x137:6 . 
N Geary, 137:6 c Webster, 27:0x137:6... 

E Fillmore! 85:6 8 Haight, 26x90:6 

INw 3d and Minnie, 75x75 

IS Bush, 171:10& w Taylor, 34:4^x187:6 

SBush, 171: 10 j* w Taylor, 20x137:0 

|Lot7, blk 329, S SF H & R R As'n..., 
[W Buchanan, 92:0 n Post, 22:6x92:0... 

|S Jackson, 117 w Drnmm, 38x120 

[WTuvlor, 31:0 n Jackson, 40x125 .! | 

(Lots 6 and 7, blk 130, Terminus ll"d....| 



117,500 
3,500 
8,500 
1,800 
500 
4.500 

Gin 

Gift 
425 

9.0U0 

375 

10,500 

3,000 
4,400 



7,022 

1,100 

1 

14,000 
8,800 
1.500 

$4,250 
2,700 

10.000 
1.000 



Wednesday, February 7th. 



Chas Neft' to Barbara Neff 

J E Foye toChasTidd 

R C Johnson to R B Kellosg . 

Pat'k Rush to Anne Rush 

II M Sackctt to Wm Hale 

Jas Mofhtt to Wm Williams .. 
Karl Grimm to E Bitrkhardt.. 

M Kelly to Jae Ambrose 

J Hepworth to TR Toggle.... 

J D Ramsey lo Chae Main 

S V H'd As n to Thos Young , 



W J Guon to Martha Dudley . 
Lloyd Tevis to Carl Precht.... 

T Mclnemey to Wm Hcatey .. 
N G B'k & T Co to Geo Plate. 

Jno F Cobb to Wm Hale 

Wm Hale to Benj F Hardy.... 
Wm Mucy to Dan 1 F Maty... 



.|Ne Ellis and Jones, 37:0x87:6 

.IE Polk, SO s Lombard, 7:0x71 :in# 

.IW Fillmore, 53 n Sac'to, 25x90:3 ~. 

.iUhd X se Brvant and Gilbert, 80x30 

. Lot 150, Gift Mapl 

. N Clay, 137:0 w Powell, e 24:4^, etc.... 

.IN Pad 'fie. 100:0 w Jones, 23x120 

. J Lots l and 2. and por of 3, B Roche City 

. I Lot 23, blk 65, Borntra' Addition 

. lLot 28 ■', Precita Valley Land 

Sundry lots in Sunny V H'd, in trust lort 
11 p Share 

S Clipper, 126 e Church, 25x114 

Und 4-9 of l-lu of lot under wuter, b ded 
by various sin ets 

N Eugedia, 150 e San -Jose R'd, 50x100.. 

Lois 281 to 286, Gift Map 3 

Lot 225, Ilolliday Map A 

Se Clay and Webster, 137:6x127:8^ 

S 28th, 280 e Dolores, 25x1 14 



~Gl.t 

1H7 
4,350 

1 ,300 

25 

7,500 

3, 51 10 

51 ill 

1.475 

2,000 

2,100 

375 

1 

600 

750 

5 

5 

800 



Thursday, February 8th. 



GustaveErlin to Chas Groeziuger 
Jos Stewart, Jr, to Jos Stewart . . 
O F Cem'lv As'n to CT McDowell 

D Douthitl to S M Folder 

PE McCartbyto S M McCarthy. . . 
J C Flood to Nevadak B'k of S F . 

Same to John W Mackay 

D Cszneanx to Isai Riheau 

J B Dorr to C E Haseltine 

J A Comboio to J M Gillono 

M E & A McMahon to M Cur ran . . 
M Cb'l Carran to Marg't McMahon 

T A Sutherland to R Kirkham 

C L Taylor to Wm Hollis 

Wm Hale to same 

E B Bad'am to Chas R SieL-er ... 
Edw Le Breton to Jtitiu Le Breton 
H S Dorland to Jane Mecredy .... 

J C Flood et al to J G Fair 

Same to J \V Mackav 

J C Flood toWraS O'Brien 



Same to J G Fair 

J W Mackay to J C Flood . 
Wm S O'Brien to same 



JC Flood etal to WS O'Brien.. 

Same to J VV Mackay 

Same to J G Fair 

A Fleishhacker to S Glazier . . . 
F S Wensinger to Wm Hollis.. 



Se Natoma,2509w 61b, 25x75 

Cud 14 n Posi, 110 w Larkin, 27:0x1*0.. 
Lot 2, Robekah Grove Sec 3, O F Cemty 

N 15th, 320 w Sanchez, 25x230 

N Clipper, 30 p Diamond, 50x114 

Nw cur Pine and Montgy, 1-J5sl38:6 ... 

Und \i same 

Se cor Eugenia and Mission, 70x100 

50-vara 322 

5 acres in the vicinity of Mount'n Lake. 

Ne. Clinton, 75 se Brannan, 25x80 

Same 

Nw Harrison, 137:0 sw 4th, sw 131:0, etc 
Nw Geary and Webster, w 221:3, etc . . 

Same 

tJeach and water lots 367 and 370 

Sundry properties in various p'ts of city 

W Church, S3 n 18th, n 41, ere 

Cud '., ecor Market and 4th, 175x170.. 

Und H same 

Und l i sw Pine & Sansome, 222:0x137:0; 

und ,■«" s Pine, 165 e Mon'g'y, 25x147:6, 

Same 

Same 

S Pine, 137:0 w Sansome, 85x137:6: aiso 

und \ s Pine, 105 e MoiHl', 25x137:6. 

s L ' Market, :;> ne 4th, 100x170 

E cor Market and 4th, 75x170 

Sw Pine and Sansome, 137:0x137:0 

Ne Cal'a and Octavia, 137:0x205: 2'..- ... 
N Geary, 197:6V e Fillmore, 8:8^x137:6 



s-s.iuhj 

1,375 

285 

800 

Gift 

"io 
2,600 

100 

1,000 

650 

650 

5 

32,250 

5 

5 

Gilt 

900 

10 

10 

10 
10 

10 

10 
10 
10 
10 

35.000 
2 



[Permanent Advertisements.] 

A KOGrTJE'S RETROSPECT. 

[From the New York Tribune, June «. 1849.] 
" Loring Pickering,'' late editor of the St. Louis Union, absconded recently, 
" leaving, it is said, many of his friends in the lurch for large amounts. On the 25th 
" ult. a warrant was issued for his arrest on a ebarg_e of forgery, preferred by Samuel 
" Treat, Esq. UtficeiT* were immediately sent up the Mi-s..uri in pursuit of him, as 
" it was supposed he had started for California,— PhUaddiilua Bulletin." 

[From the New York Tribune. June \l. 1S4S.] 
"Arrest of Pickering, late Editor of the St. Louis Union. — Subse- 
" quent accounts do not entirely confirm the reports hitherto received. It is now 
" stated, by those who ought to know, that Pickering was arrested in St. Joseph by 
"Messrs. Treat & Kruuiruii. and subsequently coniro itt'ed to the custody of the 
"Sheriff, or one of his deputies, of Kuehanan County. While in custody be found 
"means to escape, and made off to parts unknown. The party in pursuit ot him, it 
'• is said, only succeeded hi obtaining S700 from him, and no other property or notes. 
" Those in pursuit, we are told, were not prepared with any authority to follow him 
"beyond the limits of the State.— St. Louis ftfpublican, 10M. 

[From the New York Tribune, June 20, 1849.] 
11 The Absquatulator. — Information was received from St. Joseph yesterday 
'■ that Messrs, Kruinrun & Treat came up with Pickering at that place; that they 
■■ compounded witb bim for bis uiiuises bj receiving some -t75u in money and about 
" $4,000 in notes of hand, etc., and then let hini go. When the boat left he was fit- 
'" tin- mil lor California, and they were returning by easy stages to St. Louts.— &t. 
"Louis jRepublicati-, 9th. 

[•The above named Loring Pickering is now one of the Proprietors of the San 
Francisco Daily Ehiening Bulletin and Morning Cull, two papers published in 

this eity.] 

CENTENNIAL SURGERY. 
The foUowing liniment was prescribed for a broken thigh-bone by— 

Dr. Fish Oakland. | Dr. Baecock State Medical Examiner. 

Dlt. A F. Sawykr San Francisco : 

Chloroform 2 oz. I Tinet: Camphor 2 oz. 

Tinet : Arnica (?) 2 oz. \ Ol : Origanum ( .) 1 02, 

Ol : Olive 1 oz. M. 

Ft Liniment— Sign— Apply with friction two or three times a day. 
Use the above for two mouths, and, if it should not produce the effect desired, use 
t on your boots, THE VICTIM. 



Is it Repudiation? — For the State of California to issue b tuds, neglect to pro- 
vide for their redemption at maturity, refuse payment and then deny the holders the 
right of trial in her own Courts. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL ^TSAiVSHI? COMPANY, 

ITtor Japan anil China, leave wharf, corner First nn<" Bran 
" nan streets, at uoon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

OCEANIC January 10th, April 17th, July 17th and October LCth. 

BELGIC February 10th, May 16th, August Kith and November 

GAELIC March 10th, June 10th, September 18th and Deo r 1 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 4 New Mont 
goniury street. For Freight, pply at the Pacific Mai! Steamship Company's \\ barf 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Dec. l:'. 



at 



The Special Organ of "Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co. "--Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 



Prlc« p»r Copy, 15 Cent.. 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1KI56 



mil S.b.crlption (In told . tlfiO. 



gj \-3 F^ATO-Slg^ 




(Italifornia 



xiisAX. 



DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 27. 



SAN FEANOISOO. SATUBDAY. FEBEUAEy 17, 1877. 



No. 4. 



of (hr.Han Frnncliwo \»*» «* l.w ler, « Iiina Mall, (ttlilor- 
uln .Mall Bhk, South side Merchant slrcei. '• 



GOLD B.\KS-880@900 -Silver Babs— 3@12 fc* cent. dis,-. Treasury 
ue Belling .it 95$. Buying, 94-f. Mexican Dollars, par. 
Tra-I. 1 '"Hnrs, par <» \ per cent. pram. 

•9" Exchange on Now York, h per cent for Gold ; Currency, B per cent 
p-miim On London, Bankers, 49} 1.; Commercial, 49f& ; Paria, 6 
franc* [>er dollar. Telegrams, $( 5 j per cent 

«" Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 9th, at 3 p.m., 105J. Latest 
price or Sterling, 484@48C>A. 

*»* Price of Honey here, K? 1 l*?r cent per month— bank rate. In the 



open market, \<" U . Demand active. 



b 



latest from the Merchants' Exchange.-- NewYork, February 
16th 1S77 -Gold opened at 1066 \ ll A - M.,at 105S ; 3 p.m., 105$. United 
States Bond* Five-twentiee of 1867, 11-'/; 1881,110*. Sterling Ex- 
change 4 84A@4 86, short PacifioMail, 26i. Wheat, $1 50@1 60, West- 
ernUnion. 7li. Hides, dry, 21g<$22 L < quiet Oil—Sperm, SI 37(5 $1 40. 

Winter Hleai-h.-d. $1 U5 <<' 1 70. Whale, ?0U'?."»; Winter Bleached, 

Wool -Spring, fine, 22@30: Burry, 12@16; Pulled, 25@38. 
FaS ' Hi 1 -. 17@2B ; Bnrry, L6@22. LONDON, February 16th. — Liverpool 
Wheat Market, 10a 7d.@0j0e.9d. Club, 10s. 10d.(g<lls. 2d. United States 
Bonds, 107A. Consols. 96 13 L6. 



FINANCE. 
Our imports of merchandise of late, owing partly to dullness in 
trade, have been very light, consequently our indebtedness abroad has 
been and is now less than ever before; add to this the low premium of 
gold, making any shipments of coin for speculative purposes unprofitable; 
couple with this the immense production of our mine", and yon have a 
ready solution of the glut in our money market. Money is superabun- 
dant. We know of 5-per-ceut. loans repaid; plenty can be had at the 
name figure against good collaterals. Good local securities are still in de- 
mand, although Gas and Water have weakened a little. Bonds remain 
scarce, and top prices are paid for choice lots. Silver has receded to 56id. 
in London, and as a consequence Trades and Mexicans are weaker. 

We have received that which, some years back, would have been 
looked upon with curiosity, namely, the fifth report of H. Mayesima, the 
Postmaster-General of Japan, for the fiscal year, being the ninth year of 
Meiji, or, in common parlance, 1876, The actual revenue from the sale 
of postage stamps, postal cards, stamped envelopes, newspaper wrappers, 
box rents and money order fees, amounted to 595,201 83 yen (a yen is 
about a dollar), whilst the expenditures were 713,244 19 yen. Over thirty 
million letters, etc., passed through the post office during the year. There 
are in operation 3,691 post offices, 124 receiving agencies, 835 stamp agen- 
cies, and 703 street letter-boxes. In January, 1875, the post office savings 
bank system was established, and the deposits were more than doubled 
the second year. The report is very interesting as showing the progress 
of the nation, and our thanks are due to Mr. John \V. Clark, of Naga- 
saki, for sending it t o us. 

New York, February 16th,— The Tribunes editorial says : " There 
is said to be a small but adroit lobby at work in Washington on a scheme 
to get through another subsidy for the hopelessly rotten Pacific Mail 
Steamship ( "otiipany, i-n the ground that the China and Japan mails could 
not be carried without it. Congressmen should understand that this sub- 
sidy, if granted, would be simply a robbery of the United States Treas- 
ury to that amount. There is no need of giving a dollar to get these mails 
carried. In fact, a better organized company is already offering to carry 
them over this precise route merely for the ocean postages. Legislation 
at Washington nas been sufficiently disgraced by Pacific mail corruption 
already, and he would be a pretty bold Congressman who should favor 
this last scheme." 

Beerbohm's Telegram. —London and Liverpool, Feb. 16th, 1877.— 
Floating Cargoes, improving ; Cargoes on Passage, firm ; Mark Lane, 
dearer ; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 49s.; California Off Coast, 50(6 51s.;. do. 
nearly due, 52s.; do. just shipped, 53s. ; English Country Markets, up- 
ward tendency ; Liverpool, steady; California Club, 10s. 10d.@lls. 2d; 
do. average, 10s. 7d.@10s. 10d.; Red Western Spring, 10s. ld.@10s. 9d, 

Legal Tenders here are irregular at 94^ buying and 95J selling. 



Mr. V. Al^nr, \<». H < Irtiuni h Lane. Lomloii, In authorized to 

rvi ,i\. suhsi riptknis, advertisements, communications, etc., for this paper. 



Published with this week's issue a Foitr- 
Paf/e Postscript, 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF FACT AND THOUGHT- 



Some months ago there came to San Francisco from Australia an 
Englishman who parted his hair in the middle, was given to dropping his 
h's, and had married an actress. For all these things in general, and for 
the latter cause in particular, he was savagely attacked by a certain 
daily. We thought the attack an outrage and said so. Since then the 
gentleman has become himself the proprietor of a daily, and another 
Englishman has arrived from Australia who parts his hair in the middle, 
drops his h's, and lias married a great prima donna. Strange to say, the 
man who was so unjustly attacked assails the latest arrival in even worse 
terms than those of which he had himself so much reason to complain, 
and with still less cause. We think the last attack lower and more vulgar 
than the first, and avail ourselves of this opportunity to Kay so. 



J. R. Keene, the California operator; John D. Munroe & Co., Mr. 
Selover and several others, have been admitted to the New Stock Ex- 
change, New York. The Sun says: "A war between the old and new 
Boards is probable. The New Y r ork Stock Exchange opened the ball the 
other day by secretly leasing the rooms occupied by the Gold Exchange. 
This was done, a member says, to head off the new Board, which is 
largely composed of members of the Gold Exchange. Salem L. Russell, 
President of the New York Stock Exchange, says the Stock Exchange 
requires more room, and hence it took a lease of the Gold Exchange 
rooms for three years. It is understood the price paid is 820,000 a year. 

By one of those errors which are impossible- to be avoided at times, 
we recently gave credit to Mr. Reese Llewellyn, of the Columbia Foun- 
dry, for the beautiful iron work of the Baldwin Hotel. The praise should 
have been awarded to Savage &. Son, and the mistake is more unpleasant 
inasmuch as "The Baldwin" was young Mr. Savage's first contract. Mr. 
Reese Llewellyn's work was merely that of sub- con tractor, he having done 
some of the castings for Savage & Son. The immensity of the work will 
be better understood when it is added that the first story of the building 
is entirely composed of iron. 

Just as We Expected.— Since the article which appears in another 
column gotinto type a telegram announces that the Electoral Commission, 
by a strict party vote of eight to seven, has refused to inquire into the 
evidence of fraud connected with the Louisiana case. If such testimony 
could not be inquired into it is difficult to imagine any possible excuse for 
the existence of the Commission. Mr. Hayes will now undoubtedly be 
declared duly elected President of the United States. 

In preparation, and will shortly be issued and criven away gratix 
with the News Letter, an elegant map in three colors, showing the entire 
telegraphic cables laid over the whole world. This beautiful present 
shows at a glance the exact wire communication existing between the 
various countries of the Old and New World, and will be accompanied by 
an explanatory diagram illustrating- the whole. 



Quicksilver for Hongkong, Etc.— The O. and O. steamship Belgic, 
hence for China and Japan yesterday, carried nearly 4,000 flasks, valued 
at §175,000. The Pacific mail steamship Citv of San Francisco, for 
Mexican and way ports, carried 550 flasks, and the Newbern for Colorado 
and way ports carried 150 flasks. This larere export movement to China 
is indeed noteworthy. Price, 45c. 

The Vallejo Boat, which has hitherto started from the Market street 
wharf at 7.00 a.m. and 4.00 p.m., as also the Sacramento Boat, which has, 
up to the present, left Market st wharf daily at 4.00 p.m., will in future 
leave Washington st. wharf. The change of landing is a very important 
thing to notice, and our readers will find the correction duly made in the 
authentic table of the Central Pacific Railroad, elsewhere. 



The suits of A. W, Thornton and Edward Henderson against the 
Eclectric Medical Board of Examiners have been withdrawn. The 
former characters having become convinced of their folly in attempting to 
get licenses by any such means. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 17, 1877. 



[From the Fortnightly Review,] 

THE GEOGRAPHICAL ASPECT OF THE EASTERN 

QUESTION. — [Continued.] 

Here then are two ancient races, the Greeks and another race, not in- 
deed so advanced, so important, or so widely spread, but a race which 
equally keeps a real national being. . And I would adrl, as what is my 
own belief, though I cannot assert it with the same confidence as in the 
other two cases, that a third ancient race also survives as a distinct race 
in the peninsula. These are the Vlachs or Roumans, in whom I am 
strongly inclined to see the surviving representatives of the great Thra- 
cian race. Every one knows tliat, in the modern principality of Rouma- 
nia and in the adjoining parts of the Austro -Hungarian monarchy, there 
is to be seen that phenomenon so unique in the East, a people who not 
only still keep the Roman Came, but who speak neither Greek nor Turk- 
ish, neither Slave nor Skipetar, but a dialect of Latin, a tongue akin, not 
to the tongues of any of their neighbors, but to the tongues of Gaul, 
Italy, and Spain. The assumption has commonly been that this outlying 
Romance people owe their Romance character to the Roman colonization 
of Dacia under Trajan. In this view the modern Roumans would be the 
descendants of Trajan's colonists and of Dacians who had learned of them 
to adopt the speech and manners of Rome. But when we remember that 
Dacia was the first Roman province to be given up — that the modern 
Roumania was for ages the highway of every barbarian tribe on its way 
from the East to the West — that the land has been conquered and settled 
and forsaken over and over again— it would be passing strange if this 
should be the one land, and its people the one race, to keep the Latin 
tongue when it has been forgotten in all the neighboring countries. Add 
to this that the Roumans are not, and never have been, confined to the 
modern Roumania — that they are still found, if in some parts only as 
wandering shepherds, in various parts of the peninsula — that their estab- 
lishment in Dacia seems to be of comparatively recent date. All this 
may lead us to look for some other explanation of this most singular and 
puzzling phenomenon. It has indeed been thought that the modern 
Rouman is not strictly a Roman language, but rather a language akin to 
Latin, a trace of primseval kindred between the tongues of the Italian 
and the Byzantine peninsula. This would be carrying things back very 
far indeed. Such a belief would indeed be the greatest strengthening of 
my position as to the abiding character of nations and language in South- 
eastern Europe. But we need not go back so far as this. It will be 
quite enough, if we look on the Roumans as Romanized Thraeians, as the 
representatives of the great Thracian race which lived on in the inland 
parts of the peninsula while the Greeks occupied the coasts. Their lands, 
Mcesia, Thrace specially so called, and Dacia, were added to the Empire 
at various times from Augustus to Trajan. That they should gradually 
adopt the Latin language is in no sort wonderful. Their position with 
regard to Rome was exactly the same as that of Gaul and Spain. Where 
Greek civilization had been firmly established, Latin could nowhere dis- 
place it. Wherever Greek civilization was unknown, Latin overcame the 
barbarian tongue. It would naturally do so in this part of the East ex- 
actly as -it did in the West. But, though the question of the origin of 
the Roumans is of deep historical and ethnological iuterest, the questions 
which I have just been discussing are of comparatively little moment for 
my present purpose. In any case, the Roumans represent a people more 
ancient than the Slavonic setlements. If they really represent the Ro- 
man and Romanized inhabitants of Trajan's Dacia, their time of endu- 
rance would be somewhat shortened, but the difficulties of their endu- 
rance would be increased tenfold. 

Here then we have in the South-eastern peninsula three nations which 
have all lived on at least from the days of the early Roman Empire. 
Two of them, I am inclined to think all of them, have lived on from the 
very beginnings of European history. We have nothing answering to 
this in the West. It needs no pr&ofs that the speakers of Celtic and 
Basque, in Gaul and in Spain, do not hold the same position in Western 
Europe which the Greeks, Albanians, and Roumans do in Eastern Eu- 
rope. In the East the most ancient inhabitants of theland are stiU there, 
not as scraps or survivors, not as nations lingering on in corners, but as 
nations in the strictest sense, nations whose national being forms an ele- 
ment in every modern and political question. Thej' all have their memo- 
ries, their grievances, and their hopes ; and their memories, their griev- 
ances, and their hopes are all of a practical and political kind. High- 
landers, Welshmen, Bretons, Basques, have doubtless memories, but they 
have hardly political grievances and hopes. Ireland may have political 
grievances ; it certainly has political hopes ; but they are not exactly of 
the same kind as the grievances or hopes of the Greek, the Albanian, and 
the Rouman. Let Home Rule succeed to the extent of setting up an in- 
dependent king and parliament of Ireland, yet the language and civiliza- 
tion of that king and parliament would still be English. Ireland would 
form an English state, politically hostile, it may be, to Great Britain, 
but still an English state. No Greek, Albanian, or Rouman state that 
can be conceived would be in the same sense a Turkish state. 

On these primitive and abiding races came, as on other parts of Europe, 
the Roman Conquest. That conquest planted Latin colonies on the Dal- 
matian coast, where the Latin tongue still remains in its Italian variety 
as the speech of literature and city life— it Romanized in any.case some 
part of the earlier inhabitants, be they Thracians or be they Dacians — it 
had the great political effect of all, that of planting the Roman power in 
a Greek city, and thereby creating a state, and in the end a nation, which 
was Roman on one side, and Greek on the other. Then came the Wan- 
dering of the Nations, on which, as regards men of our own race, we need 
not dwell. The Goths marched at will through the Eastern Empire ; but 
no Teutonic settlement was ever made within its bounds, no lasting Teu- 
tonic settlement was ever made even on its border. The part of the Teu- 
ton in the West was played far less perfectly indeed by the Slave in the 
East. On the points of likeness and unlikeness between the part played 
by the Teutons in the W T est and that played by the Slaves in the East, I 
cannot enlarge here. The great point to be borne in mind is that the 
Slave in the East does answer, however imperfectly, to the Teuton in the 
West, that he is there what the Teuton is here, the great representative 
of what we may call the modern European races, those whose part in his- 
tory began after the establishment of tlje Roman power. The differences 
with which we are here concerned between the position of the two races 
are chiefly these. The Slave in the East has, as we have seen, pree-Ro- 
man races standing alongside of him in a way in which the Teuton has 
not in the West. He also stands alongside of races which have come in 
since his own coming, in a way which the Teuton in the West, is still | 



further from doing. That is to say, besides Greeks, Albanians, and Rou- 
mans, he stands alongside of Bulgarians, Sfagyara, and Turks, who have 
nothing to answer to them in the West. There arena people, Latin or 
Greek in speech, who have been brought under Slavonic influences in the 
same way in which the Romance nations have been brought under Teu- 
tonic influences. We might say that the Greeks answer to the Welsh in 
both senses of the word, at once to the Celtic and to the Latin-speaking 
people of Western Europe. The causes of all these differences I hope to 
explain in another shape ; we have now to deal only with the differences 
themselves. The Slave, in the time of his coming, in the nature of his 
coming, in the nature of his settlement, answers roughly to the Teuton ; 
his position is what that of the Teuton would be, if Western Europe had 
been brought under the power of an alien race at some time later than its 
own settlement. The Slaves undoubtedly form the greatest element in 
the population of the Eastern peninsula, and they once reached more 
widely still. Taking the Slavonic name in its widest meaning, they oc- 
cup3 r all the lands from the Danube and its great tributaries southward 
to the strictly Greek border. The exceptions are where earlier races re- 
main, Greek or Italian on the coast-line, Albanian in the mountains. The 
Slaves hold the heart of the peninsula, and they hold more than the pen- 
insula itself. Here comes in a fact which bears very directly on the poli- 
tics of the present moment, the fact that the present frontier of the Aus- 
trian and Ottoman Empires, a frontier so dear in the ej'es of diplomatists, 
is no natural or historical frontier at all, but simply comes of the wars of 
the last century. The Slave lives equally on both sides of it; indeed but 
for the last set of causes which have affected Eastern Europe, the Slave 
might have reached uninterruptedly from the Baltic to the ^gean. 

This last set of causes are those which specially distinguish the histories 
of Eastern and of Western Europe, those which have caused the special 
difficulties of the last five hundred years. In Western Europe,' though 
we have had plenty of political conquests, we have had no national mi- 
grations since the days of the Teutonic settlements — at least, if we may 
extend these last so as to take in the Scandinavian settlements in Britain 
and Gaul. The Teuton has pressed to the East at the expense of the 
Slave and the Old Prussian ; the borders between the Romance and the 
Teutonic nations in the West have fluctuated; but no third set of nations 
has come in, strange alike to the Roman and the Teuton and to the whole 
Aryan family. As the Huns of Attila showed themselves in Western 
Europe as passing ravagers, so did the Magyars at a later day ; so did 
the Ottoman Turks in a day later still, when they besieged Vienna and 
laid waste the Venetian mainland. But all these Turanian invaders ap- 
peared in Western Europe simply as passing invaders; in Eastern Europe 
their part has been widely d ffcrent. Besides the temporary dominion of 
Avars, Patzinaks, Chazars, Cumans, and a crowd of others, three bodies 
of more abiding settlers, the Bulgarians, the Magyars, and the Mogul 
conquerors of Russia, have come in by one path ; a fourth, the Ottoman 
Turks, have come in by another path. Among all these invasions we 
have one case of thorough assimilation, and only one. The original Fin- 
nish Bulgarians, like Western conquerors, have been lost among Slavonic 
subjects and neighbors ; the modern Bulgarian is a Slave bearing the 
Bulgarian name, as the modern French is a Gaul bearing the Frankish 
name. The geographical function of the Magyar has been to keep the 
two great groups of Slavonic nations apart. To his coming, more than 
to any other cause, we may attribute the great historical gap which sepa- 
rates the Slave of the Baltic from his southern kinsfolk. The work of 
the Ottoman Turk we all know. These, later settlers remain alongside of 
the Slave, just as the Slave remains alongside of the earlier settlers. The 
Slavonized Bulgarians are the only instance of assimilation such as we are 
used to in the West. All the other races, old and new, from the Alba- 
nian to the Ottoman, are still there, each keeping its national bein^ and 
its national speech. And in one part of the ancient Dacia we must add 
quite a distinct element, the element of Teutonic occupation in a form 
unlike any in which we see it in the West, in the shape of the Saxons of 
Transylvania. 

We have thus worked out our point in detail. While in each Western 
country some one of the various races which have settled in it has, speak- 
ing roughly, assimilated the others, in the East all the races that have 
ever settled in the country still abide side by side. And it is important 
to remark that this phenomenon is not peculiar to the lands which are 
now under the Turk ; it is shared equally with the lands which form the 
Austro-Hungarian monarchy. We may for the moment set aside those 
parts of Germany which are so strangely united with the crowns of Hun- 
gary and Dalniatia. In those parts of the monarchy which come within 
our present survey, the Roman and the Rouman — we may so distinguish 
the Romance-speaking inhabitants of Dalmatia and the Romance -speak- 
ing inhabitants of Transylvania— the Slave of the north and of the south, 
the Magyar conqueror, the Saxon immigrant, all abide as distinct races. 
That the Ottoman is not to be added to our list in Hungary, while he is 
to be added to Bulgaria, is simply because he has been driven out of Hun- 
gary, while he is allowed to abide in Bulgaria. No point is more impor- 
tant to insist on now than the fact that the Ottoman once held the 
greater part of Hungary by exactly the same right, the right of the strong- 
est, as that by which he still holds Bosnia and Bulgaria. It is simply 
the result of a century of warfare, from Sobieski to Joseph the Second, 
which has fixed the boundary which to diplomatists seems eternal. That 
boundary has advanced and gone back over and over again. As Buda 
once was Turkish, Belgrade has more than once been Austrian. In the 
old days of Austrian intolerance, the persecuted Protestant of Hungary 
deemed the yoke of the Sultan less heavy than that of the Emperor- 
king. In days of better rule in the Hungarian kingdom, the Servian 
rayah welcoined the Emperor-king as his deliverer from the Sultan. The 
whole of these lands, from the Carpathian Mountains southward, present 
the same characteristic of permanence and distinctness among the several 
races which occupy them. The several races may lie, here in large con- 
tinuous masses, there in small detached settlements ; but there they all 
are in their distinctness. It would be hard to trace out in these lands a 
state of the same scale as any of the great states of Western Europe 
which should consist of one race, language, or religion. The point to be 
specially borne in mind is that this characteristic belongs equally to the 
Austrian and to the Turkish Empire, and that the frontier which divides 
the two is a purely artificial one, the result of several fluctuations during 
the wars of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 
[To be Continued.] 



OFFICES OF THE AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO., 

No. 607 to U15 Merchant street, san Francisco* 



ivi.. 17, is;:. 



CALIF0RN1 \ -\l»\ ERTISKR. 



THE LEAF PROPHETIC 

Row I Um :\i< d ftl • !"llv, 

Afl in |ii.i\ b« r. -i.l iiiv fortune 
i leal -<i ■hlidng h«>llv. 
-.iiil kht !■ it prop] 
" N-'.t v. ;»r," softly whispered some 
WhiK- I ntd wiu ttiah, 

" I -hill w.-.l next vi.ir with i: 
N Chri u&d * 'hriatnufl goeth : 

1 have said i f 
Whan the next \ i trass oometh 

It thai) find da Ntilt unweddi 

But the spring-tune nine with Mussoma, 

Left B Bad M fWeitlv I,: 

'Which the iierfumed breetE of sutnnier 

Penned into ■ fion 
And when autumn's golden (rlory 

Gleamed o'er 6eldi and purple heafhar, 
Then our love reached its fulfillment 

When two hands wire olaBpad together. 
And the frosts and snows of winter 

Brought us nr.t .me thought of BadneaBj 
For the outer doaolation 

Uade more bright the inner gladness. 
istanai oame! and some one fastened 

In my hair a leaflet golden: 
''Wear this as a penance, darling, 

For the sake of memorial olden." 

— Chamber's Journal. 



A NOVEL SUGGESTION. 
The Queen of Madagascar baa heen "spreading" herself on the 
temperance question, and has suggested a novel expedient for quashing 
of drunkenness among her swarthy subjects. She proposes to 
hold every liquor deal ile for the acts of his customers, on the 

theory that the origin at all crime is due more or less to alcoholic influ- 
ence. However beoefieial in its results it may prove " in the sweet bye 
and bye,* 1 at the present moment it has been the cause of a few startling 1 
embarrassments. An innocent compounder of cocktails suddenly one 
If under arrest for an alleged wife beating, owing to 
the fact that an !t'tJ>>t»- of his saloon, having contributed a solitary dime 
to his till during the day, had taken it into his head to caress his better 
half affectionately over the eyebrow with a tin coffee-pot ! Having pro- 
bail, he started back, in a meditative mood, only to 
i" awaiting his arrival with a double charge of burg- 
lurv and garrotmg. Onable to clear himself, he is now anxiously waiting 
for further developments. Should Dur < 'ity Fathers think fit to introduce 
this improved system of legislation, an additional feature will be neces- 
sary in the professional'acQuirementa of the San Franciscan bartender. 
Apart from the knowledge of the due proportion of limes to a corre- 
sponding amount of alcohol, this new creature must be able to prove his 
muscular superiority over any amount of bull-dozing specials, and an in- 
stinctive acquaintance with the temperaments of his customers. Other- 
wise his attendance at his boss 1 bar will be slightly irregular, and the 
greater part of his board-biU will be contributed by the united tax of a 
ted body of rate-payers ! 

LORD DUFFERIN SPEAKS AGAIN. 
On Thursday, Feb. 8, Lord Dufferin opened the Dominion Parliament 
at Ottawa, Canada. He expressed his pleasure at visiting Brit. Columbia, 
and said : "The provincial surveys of the Pacific Railway have been 
prosecuted with the utmost vigor, and at a larger cost during the past 
than in any former year, but it had not been found possible as yet to 
complete the location of the Pacific end of the line, and that in conse- 
quence tenders for construction on the terms indicated by the Act of 1874 
had to be postponed." In speaking of the Canadian treatment of the 
Indian races, he said that " his government had made an engagement to 
negotiate a treaty with the remaining tribes east of the Rocky Mountains. 
The expenditure incurred by the Indian treaties was no doubt large, but 
the Canadian expenditures are nevertheless cheap if we compare results 
with those* of other countries, and it is above all a humane, just and 
Christian policy. It is a notable fact that notwithstanding the deplorable 
war waged between Indian tribes in the United States territories and the 
government, no difficulty has arisen with the Canadian tribes Living in the 
immediate vicinity of the scene of hostilities." It is certainly true that 
the Canadians are more successful in their management of the Indians 
than we are. We strongly suspect that much of the cause is to be found 
in the fact that they place no swindling agents in a position to fatten upon 
warfare. 

A "WIFE'S LETTER. 
My Dear Husband: I got here last night all safe, and was met at the 
station by uncle and aunt. They were so glad I had corae, but were sorry 
that you were not along. I miss you so much. We had hot rolls for 
breakfast this morning, and they were so delicious. I want you to be so 
happy while I am here. Don't keep the meat up stairs. It will surely 
spoil. Do you miss me now? Oh ! if you were only here, if but for an 

hour! Has Mrs. O'R brought back your shirts? I hope the bosoms 

will suit you. You will find the milk tickets in the clock. I forgot to 
tell you about them before I came away. What did you do last evening? 
Were you lonesome without me? Don't forget to scald the milk every 
morning. And I wish you would see if I left the potatoes in the pantry. 
If I did, they must be sour by this time. How are you getting along? 
Write me all about it. But I must close now. Oceans of love to you. 
Affectionately your wife. P. S. — Don't set the teapot on the stove.— Aus- 
tralian Journal. 

Photography by night is being largely practiced in the City Road and 
Islington neighborhoods. Several persons have been taken from life quite 
recently. The process is generally the Daggerytype. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN. 



COLLATERAL LOAN AMD SWINGS BANK, CORNER POST AND 
KEARNY STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Incorporated Undor the Laws of the State of California. 



BUI 

■ 



J. S.8PKAR, JR Secretvj K. S.CAHTKR. 

ROBT STEVENSON Appraiser OE 

rpiiii*. iiimk i% prepared »<► loan money ■poo collateral aeen- 

X riUi i i ■ i 

. I - MM 

Deposit*, and allow the follow In tsol *i\ months, 

i per oent per month ; Twelve months, 1} per oent per month. 
November I • i U - 1 i It, Secretary. 

GSRM*N SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

(imiriiiiifi- Capital *;aoo,0O0.— Offlee oaa California aireet, 
X North M'k\ between M.iii_'..iji, n an.l K. ..in;, !.■..[ Oltlee liuiir*, from !' am 

Extra hour on Saturdays from rtofl p.m, for receiving ol Deposits onlj 

Loans made on Real Estate and other mlhtcrul -•■ unties, -,a ..-urrctit i ■ 

President L. QOTTTG. j Secretary GEO. LETTS. 

DIRECTORS. 

F R'ifiliiiir, II- Schmieden, Chas. Kohlcr, Ed. Kruso, Dan. Meyer, George BL Eg- 
(,'it*, I*. Sj>rcekles, N. Van \i> i Feb. 1. 

MARKET S TREE! BANK OF SAVINGS, 
634 Market St., Opposite Palace Hotel. 

President THOMAS B. LEWIS, 

Secretary \v. E. LATSON. 

Interest allowed on nil itcposi i h renin In tug In Bank over 
thirty days, interest on term deposits, 12 per cent, per ai m DepostU re- 
ceived from one dollar upward No charge f"r liunk Bonk. On receipt "f remlt- 

r.uii the iriKri-.r. haul; linol;*. ,, r i ertitieales <>\ Deposit will be fnrwarded or 
delivered to agent. Bank o|>cn on Saturdays till 9 o'clock i-.m. October 28. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 
*T*>^> California street, corner Webb. Capital and Re- 
fJO-C' serve, $i! l.ooo. Deposits, .^i, 'J lit, ooo. Directors: James do Fremery, 
President : Albert Miller. Vice-President ; 0. Adolpbe Low. d. j. Oliver, Charles 
Baum, Charles Pace, Washington Bartlett, A. Campbell, Ben., Oeorge 0. Potter; 
Cashier, LoveU White. Dividends tor two years past nave been 7J and y per cent, re- 
spectively, mi ordnurv ami term deposits. Dividends are payable semi-annually, in 
January and July. Honey loaned on real estate and on United States Bonds, or 
equivalent securities. October 30. 

PIONEER LAND AND LOAN BANK OF SAVINGS AND DEPOSIT. 

Southeast corner California and Montgomery streets. Safe 
De|*>sit Block. Incorporated lWii). Guarantee Fund. jf20u,000. Dividend N». 
105 payable on March 5th. Ordinary deposits receive per cent. Term de- 
l-isit- receive IS per cent. This incorporation is in its ninth year, and refer* to 
over 5,700 depositors for its successful and economical management. 

H. KOFAHL, Cashier. 
Tuos. Gray, President. J. C. Doxcax, S ecretary. • March 27 

MAS3NIC SAVINGS AND 10AN BANE, 

No. 6 Post street, Masonic Temple, Nan Francisco, Cal.-« 
Moneys received on Term ami Ordinary Deposits ; dividends paid semi- 
annually ; loans made on approved security. This bank solicits the patronage of all 
persons. (March 25.] H T. GRAVKS, Secretary. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott ; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bnsh street, above Kearny, Q. Blahe, Director, toans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



411 



SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and California Sts. 

CAPITAL r. 82.000.000. 

Tbis Company is now open Tor the renting- of vaults, mid (lie 
transaction of all business connected with a Safe Depository. Pamphlets gh inn 
full information and rates can be obtained at the office of the' Company. Hours, 
from Sa.m. to p.m. September 18. 

ODORLISS 

Excavating: Apparatus Company of San Franclsco.--Empty- 
inn Vaults, Sinks, Cess] K Sewers, Cellars. Wells and Excavations in the day- 
time without offence, orders left at the following places will receive prompt atten- 
tion: Madison A; Burke's, corner Sacramento and Montgomery streets; Office Super- 
intendent of Streets, City Hall; Office, 012 Commercial street, or addressed to Presi- 
dent, Post Office box 10, City. Feb. 3. 



W. Morris. 



J. F. Kennedy. 



Jos. Schwab. 
MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO, 

Importers and Dealers in Moldings, Frames, Engravings, 
Chromos, Lithographs, Dflbalcomanie, Wax and Artists' Materials, '21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Regular Steamers to Portland, leaving San Francisco 
weekly Steamers GEORGE W. ELDER, J. L. STEPHENS, OR1FLAMME, 
and AJAX, connecting with steamers to SITKA and PUGET SOUND, and O. andC. 
R. R. Co, and Oregon C. R. R. Co. through Willamette, Umpqua, and Rogue River 
Valleys, Oregon. Tickets to all points on the O. and C R. R. sold at reduced rates. 

K. A' AN OTERENDORP, Agent, 
June 14. 210 Battery street. 

STUART 8. WRIGHT, 

Attorney and Counsellor at Law, No. 504 Kearny street, 
San Francisco, California. Feb. S. 

QUICKSILVER. 
or sale—In lots to soit, by Thomas Bell, No. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. lfl. 



F 



NOTICE. 
or the very best photographs go to Bradley A Rnlorsou's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



F 



G. G. GAEXBULDI. 

Fresco and Decoration, Nevada Block, No's 73 and 74. 
[January 13.] 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LE^ER ASD 



Feb. 17, 1877. 



THEATRICAL, ETC. 
California Theater. — The present week has been given up, except on 
one evenin" to benefits. That of Edwin Adams was in some respects the 
most remarkable occasion of the kind ever seen in this city, and proves 
more emphatically than ever that Califomian big-hearted niimihcuice is 
no myth. Whatever our citizens do they do with a royal good mil, and 
on this occasion the densely crowded house was not large enough by halt. 
The boxes were sold at fabulous prices by auction, and one friend of the 
beneficiary. Mr. Sothern, paid five hundred dollars for a particular seat 
We are sure no other city in the country could produce so wholesome and 
hearty a scene as the reception given the invalid young star as the curtain 
rose upon him, seated, and surrounded by the California s immense com- 
pany. He must have indeed felt that from every part of the huge audi- 
ence "outstretching hands, in true, though voiceless greetings, clasped 
his own,— to quote from Mr. Jessup's beautiful little poem of welcome, 
and which, we are sorry to say, Mr. Hill altered for the worse in two 
instances. The bill contained, verv appropriately, Home, most delight- 
fully played, and showing Mr. Sothern to the greatest advantage yet : 
followed by some farces. Miss Rose Moss made her debut on Tuesday as 
Camille, which part she repeats at to-day's matinee. Possessing much 
ease of manner and knowledge of stage business for a novice, we are still 
compelled to say that Miss Moss adds another to the list of those who 
be"in at the wrong end of the ladder. Another remarkable beneht was 
that of Miss Alice Harrison, on Thursday evening. It is generally esti- 
mated as the largest house of the year. Over six hundred people were 
turned away from the door, and the gross receipts exceeded three thou- 
sand dollars. The popularity of this clever little Proteus in petticoats was 
illustrated by the way in which her belated friends bought their tickets 
all the same, and went away good-naturedly tearing them up. Ike bill 
was School, most admirably played, and the burlesque of Lucretia Borgia. 
The latter was very cleverly localized, but in it the utter physical exhaus- 
tion of the company, consequent upon rehearsing four separate plays 
every day for a week, was very visible. The audience was in a thorough 
good' humor, however, and deluged its favorite with applause and flowers. 
In response to the "call" of the evening, Miss Harrison returned thanks 
in a quaint and telling little speech, which concluded with the wish that 
her friends' mouths could, for the moment, be all made one, so that she 
could kiss them good night. To-night, Mr. Charles Bishop takes his 
benefit with what can safely be called a " screaming" bill. He appears m 
his famous original character of "Butterby," in the Victims, and as 
"Widow Twankey," in the burlesuue of Aladdin. In the latter part he 
is said to be enormously funny, and we understand the piece has been 
written full of fresh local fun by some of the cleverest pens in town. Mr. 
Bishop, take him all in all, is probably the most popular comedian ever 
seen in San Francisco, and besides being one of the most thorough schol- 
ars and admirable actors now on the stage, has countless very well 
deserved friends in private life. It is safe to predict another literally 
jammed house, and the wise man is he who gets into his seat before the 
crush. On Monday, Miss Jeffries Lewis opens in Pique, a powerful and 
successful play gracefully stolen piecemeal from other men's brains by the 
light-fingered Daly. . 

Maguire's Opera House. -The new troupe of minstrels are playing 
to good houses, and have evidently made an excellent impression. Some 
of the performers are unusually good, and the sketch of The Court of Ap- 
peals sets the benches "on a roar" nightly. Suck names as Frank Moran, 
John Hart and Sheridan and* Mack are immense attractions, even when 
taken singly. It is undoubtedly the most expensively organized troupe 
ever seen here. The improvement made in the song and dance business 
by Johnson and Bruno are immense, the very amusing additions being 
the gems of the whole performance. Such artists as these are sure to 
keep up the popularity of the minstrel show. 

The Opera House. — As the diamond brightens by attrition, so 
Bound the World in Ehhtu Days improves by repetition. The large houses 
still continue, and anything more thoroughly enjoyable and worth seeing 
than this performance it would be hard to imagine. 

Piatt's Hall. -Joe Taylor's Comedy Company is playing to poor busi- 
ness at this most uncomfortable of halls. Little Mattie, their chief at- 
traction, is well worth better business. 

CROSBY-BRYANT NUPTIALS. 
At eight o'closk on Thursday evening Miss Mary J. Bryant, eldest 
dau"hter of A. J. Bryant, Mayor of our city, was united to Dr. George 
A Crosby, of Manchester, New Hampshire. The ceremony took place 
in the Unitarian Church, which was elegantly decorated. The Rev 
Horatio Stebbins tied the nuptial knot, and an elegant reception was held 
afterwards at 822 Sutter street, the residence of the bride s father, ihe 
weddin" presents were numerous and costly, and the eSlite of the city 
offered their congratulations to the happy pair. The bride was attired in 
an elegant white gros grain silk dress, covered with white illusion, and with a 
lon<- train The front of the skirt was draped in folds and orange sprays; 
cuirass waist, cut high, with ruchvng around her neck and orange blos- 
soms at the throat. Her hair was in a braid, looped at the back and 
fastened with a bunch of orange flowers. A bridal vail covered the head 
and fell gracefully in folds. The ornaments worn were chiefly white roses 
and orange blossoms. All the bridesmaids were likewise exquisitely 
dressed During the evening congratulatory telegrams were received 
from ex-Governor Smith, of New Hampshire, and ex-Mayor Wickham, 
of New York. The young couple started early yesterday morning on a 
wedding tour through the Southern counties. 

With regret we have to announce the death of Mr. H. A. Siegfried, 
one of the lessees of Piatt's Hall. He was returning from a meeting of 
the 10 of Red Men, a week ago, when he slipped, on the corner of 
Dupont and Bush streets, striking his knee heavily. Inflammation set in, 
in spite of medical attendance, and he died on Thursday evening last, at 
7 o'clock. Mr. Siegfried was an honored member of four societies— the 
Odd Fellows, Druids, Red Men, and the Teutonia. 

A correspondent writes us : " The art critique (?) of the Bulletin 
and Post are most respectfully informed that abuse is not criticism. 
Also that when any fellow is silly enough to rush into print, upon snb- 
ie-ts'upon which he is grossly ignorant, ordinary eyes, without specks, 
can see the ass' ears. The "hanging committtee " of the Art Association 
is also informed that their refusal to hang Reichart's Niagara on the 
plea that it had been previously exhibited, is worthy of the Committee. 



One cannot help feeling the profound truth of the words which Shak- 
speare puts into the mouth of Ulysses: 

Time hath my lord, a wallet at his back, 

"Wherein he puts alms for oblivion, 

A great siz'd monster of ingratitudes: 

Those scraps are good deeds past ; which are devour'd 

As fast as they are made, forgot as soon 

As done. 

Mrs. Julia Ward Home has been refused entertainment at a "Min- 
nesota hotel because she is a female lecturer. Oh, brave Boniface! Oh 
brave defender of men's rights ! Send on your name and address to this 
office and you shall receive post free a copy of the San Francisco News 
Letter for a whole year, provided you give proof that you are the genuine 
man who turned the lady out, and enclose 810 in gold coin as your sub- 
scription. 

The sole agents for Krug Private Cuvee are Hellmann Brothers & 
Co. , 525 Front street. 

CALIFORNIA THE4TER. 

Bush street, above Kearny.— John McCnllongh, Proprietor 
and Manager ; Barton Hill, Acting Manager. Saturday Matinee, February 
17th (Bv Request),' MISS ROSE MOSS, ay CAMILLE. Saturday Evening, February 
17th, FIRST BENEFIT of MR. C. B. BISHOP. Monday Evening, February Kith, 
Mr. Auguitine Daly's Great Drama, PIQUE, a Play of To-Day, as acted 250 consecu- 
tive times, or a season of eight months, at the Fifth Avenue Theater, will be produced 
under the direction of Mr. John Moore, with MJSS JEFFREYS LEWIS, as MABEL, 
from the Fifth Avenue Theater, New York. Feb. 17. 

MAGUIRE'S OPERA HOUSE. 

Bush street, between Montgomery and Kearny . --- Thos. 
Maguire, Proprietor and Manager. Saturday Evening, February 17th, and ev- 
ery evening, an Array of Minstrel Talent. New Faces ! New Acts ! First Appear- 
ance of MAGUIRE'S CALIFORNIA MINSTRELS. The world-renowned John Hart, 
Billy Arlington, Johnson and Bruno, R. T. Tyrrell, Beaumont Reid, Ernest Linden, 
Frank Moral], W. Moreland, Sheridan and Mack, Joe Norcross, W. H. Gilla, James 
Morrison, and a full and efficient orchestra. Grand Matinee Saturday Afternoon. 

NEW BELLA UNION THEATER. 

Kearny street, between Washington and Jackson.— Samuel 
Tctlow, Proprietor. This Evening, Male and Female Minstrels. CHARLEY 
REED, in his Great Specialty ,| THE FUNNY OLD GAL! SUED LeCLAIR on the 
Invisible Wire! CARRIE LEON and SAM SWAIN, Acrobatic Song and Dance 
Sketch ! CARRIE LAVARNIE, in her Serio-Comic Gems ! MONS. ANDRE CHRIS- 
TOL, in his Feats of Strength ! The whole to conclude with the Two- Act Sensational 
Melo-Drama. entitled JONATHAN BRADFORD! OR THE MURDER AT THE 
ROADSIDE INN" ! Monday. February 19th, first appearance of the Celebrated Char- 
acter Artist, MR. GEOBGEC STALEY. Feb. 17. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

John McCnllongh, Proprietor and Manager: Barton Hill, 
Acting Manager. ROSE MOSS, its CAMILLE ! at the California Theater, at the 
Saturday Matinee. The repetition of last Tuesday's performance does not only es- 
tablish the fact that the debutante is of great promise, but that the Management has 
done well in thus acknowledging her ability. Feb. 17. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Mission street, between Third and Fourth.— Acting? Man- 
ager, Mr. Chas. Wheatleic:h ; Scenic Artist, Mr. Wrh. Voegtlin. This Satur- 
day Evening, February 17th, THE TOUR OF THE WORLD IN EIGHTY DAYS ! 
The most magnificent production ever witnessed in California. Every evening at 8 
o'clock, and Grand Matinee at 2 o'clock on Saturday, February 17th. Feb. 17. 

FOR PORTIAND, OREGON. 
he Only Direct Ijine.— Steamship ©eorge W. Elder, Con. 

_ nor, Commander, leaves Folsom-street wharf, SATURDAY. Feb. 17th, at 10 A. M. 
Feb. 17. K. VAN OTEREN DORP, Agent, 210 Battery St. 

CAHF0RTUA THEATER. 

First Benefit in San Francisco or Mr. C.B. Bishop. Saturday 
Evening, February 17th. Tom Taylor's great comedy, THE VICTIMS, and 
Henry J. Byron's laughable burlesque, ALADDIN ; or,' THE WONDERFUL 
SCAMP ! February 17. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

NORTHEaN DIVISION. 

Excursion Season, 1877. --The Southern PaciGc Railroad 
Company respectfully calls the attention of Military Companies, Sunday 
Schools, Societies, Private Parties, etc., to the Superior Facilities afforded by their 
Line for Reaching with Spied, Safety and Comfort, the most popular Pleasure Grounds 
in the State, including those well known retreats, Belmont, Redwood, Menlo Park, 
Santa Clara, San Jose, etc. For rates, terms and other information, apply at Room 
34 Railroad Building, corner of Fourth and Towusend streets. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 
J. L. Willcittt, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. Feb. 17. 

NOIICE-A NEW FEATURE. 

To Principals of loini;- radios' Seminaries, Bonrding 
Schools and Colleges— MR. PETER JOB, the San Francisco Pioneer French 
Chief Cook and Confectioner, well known as a first-class Caterer and Cook, having 
kept in this city the best Restaurant and Ice-Cream Saloon for the last twenty years, 
offers his services as a Teacher of the Culinary Art; also. Fancy Dishes and Pastry. 
To those wishing to form a class, arrangements could easily be made at terms, by 
sending names and address to PETER JOB, 
No. 2.119 California street, San Francisco. 
No objection to go out of the city. New York, London and Paris have suoh 
classes for ladies. Feb. 17. 

"BUGS IN SPRING VALLEY WATER." 

Jewett's Water Filter and Cooler Should be Used in Every 
Family Hotel, Restaurant, Saloon, etc. For sale by E. K. HOWES & CO., 
Feb. 17. lis. 120 and 122 Front street. 



T 



O 



E. MALLANDA1NE, ARCHITECT. 
fflce 318 California Street, Boom IS. 



Feb. 17. 



SUTRO & CO., 

Bankers and Brokers, 408 Montgomery street. —Highest 
pricj paid for U. S. Bonds, County Bonds, Scrip, Currency and Foreign Coin. 
Exch ange drawn on New .York. May 20 

MONEY TO LOAN. 

John T. Little, Money Broker and Beal Estate Agent, dis- 
counts notes and loans money on all kinds of collaterals in large amounts; buys 
and sells real estate. OFFICE : 405* CALIFORNIA STREET. 

Dec. 25. Opposite Bank of California. 



Feb. IT, 1877.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



DIPHTHERIA. 
The long-continued high mortality from diphtheria affordi 

which prevails on question* oi 

health. Mill it] i.itirv officials .iti ! II 

■ put >% check "ii the epidemic or prevent the fatal issue of its 
For imut} m. .nth- |uut thia ilUeaiw han prevail 
ohildp ■ ui irt boon thej en playing ah ml and lying 

Mountain i- crowded with the tinv nu 
formal consult ttioni Iheir head*, acknowlodgin 

flatten it- feeble wingi and tries 
iu rain to J win feci I . and the < ' i t >- Pathei • hope that 

the rains will reoiuve tin- reeking deposits from the Beware, and thai the 
wibcUtuf Spring will soon be here to aave the little ones, Bui Dearly all 
ihi- i- lament The day foi tioh dis- 

ks providential i i long gone by, Nobodj now relies upon 

I yet, alas! nobody can say 
that thi advent of applied knowledge is near at hand. The time will 
•ome when the Coroner will bold inqueeta on these murders by default, 
and people will know that they may escape diphtheria fust :i* surely aa 
they do tli.' ; u times, In plain terms, diphtheria if 

- "filth." It exists only in the presence of a polluted atmosphere, 
It baa, in fact, exactly th the plagues which have long 

■ hssed away. It i- not so deadly in it-* action as some of them, but 
on thai more easily escaped Compared with 

other diseases of tb --. iti- neither the most intractable m r 

Small-pox kills old as well as young, whilst the adults 
only succumbs to diphtheria when the poison has been taken in :i concen- 
trated form and the recipient is in actual bad health, The contagion of 
diphtheria is not to persistent aa that of scarlatina, nor is it bo easily dif- 
rnsed. There is do ei idenos that it clings bo perm tnently to articles of 
clothing, nor is it so easily propagated in pure air. The dipnthi ria poison 
i- tees generally diffused It can Boarcely exist without a continual' sup- 
ply of tilth. Sporadic cases may occasionally occur in wholesome houses 
and well ventilated districts, but the real poison is maintained and propa- 
gated by damp, ill drained ground, foul Bubsoils, choked sewers, del 

trains, unwholesome ill-ventilated houses, impure air in 

bed-rooms, and by the systematic neglect of the most reasonable protect- 
* .iti. hi-. 

mxjous to carry -'iit a system of protective hygiene we would 
say: Look first to the basements of your housee, Btop op the rat holes 
through which the sewer gases escape into the houses. Have the house 
drains dashed and ventilated See that the water pipes of your baths 
and wash-basins empty themselves into the open air outside the houses, 
and thu ted from the sewers, so Bhall your bed moms be free 

t"r»>in poison. Let the BoO pipes of your closets be carried upwards to the 
roof and then- be Left open. See that there is an opening for the escape 
of gas between the public sewer and the bouse. Have the water tanks 
well cleaned out and boil and filter all the water that is drunk. Warm 
your rooms with open fir.- grates and spare not coal at night. Keep the 
ature of the nosrcry at 62* Fahrenheit. Burn no gas in the bed- 
rooms. Open the windows so that there is a small opening between the 
d bottom saah but none at the bottom of the window. Cloth the 
young in warm flannel, particularly at night. Keep your young onea in 
th, house •!"■/ all your child mi -it home. Cars and schools and crowded 
places are all dangerous. Catarrhs and sore throats are easily taken out 
of doors and invite diptheria. Feed the young on milk in the morning 
and a little meat and vegetables in the middle of the day. Avoid candy, 
cakes and heavy suppers. So shall your children be 'both strong and 
healthy and become aa well able to resist diptheria as adults. 

And when the disease arrives remove the healthy right away, and give 
the sick plenty of pure, coo] air. Send for your physician quickly and 
believe not quacks and newspapers. He who believes in a specific is a 
He who says that he can cure all is a liar. It is no doubt to be 
regretted that do tors differ in their treatment and vary as to their ability 
and means. But if they acquire not knowledge and experience who 
should '.' When there is danger there will be satisfaction if not safety in a 
multitude of counsellors. Let reason be your guide. Brandy and whisky 
are poi-on to an infant at the breast, but yet may be the saving of a 
life when wisely given. Choose your own consnlters, for in this city there 
is a practice much to be deprecated, of calling in friends who are sure to 
agree in all that has been done. 



PARACRAPHIANA. 

Fro Bono Publico. 



HOW THE CONTAMINATION SPREADa 
The allegations of swindling, bribery and fraud, which, with too 
much reason, have for months past filled our dailies, exercise a contami- 
nating influence much wider than is seen at first sight. The newspapers 
circulate among the illiterate and the simple-minded, who are ready to be 
molded by the influences around them. These people read, and believe 
what they read, and the misfortune is that they have often too much 
cause for believing. They hear of corruption in high quarters and of dis- 
honesty on everyside of public life. They are taught that there is no vir- 
tue anywhere within the region of politics. One man has just now, in a 
most simple-minded way, evidenced a strong, abiding and practical faith 
in the teaching of the times. Mr. Tassey Stewart, farmer, of Yuba 
county, implicitly believed that old Zach. Chandler, as Secretary of the 
Interior, would jump at a bribe of even $300, in gold. That Zach. 
might be just a little careful about not accepting it in such a way as to be 
found out, does not seem to have entered Tassey's imagination. He 
wrote directly to the Secretary and asked for a direct reply. Detective 
Fiunegrass accommodated him with a favorable communication, laid a trap 
for him. which he walked into with all the innocence of an honest farmer 
unconscious of any wrong, and now, for learning his lesson too well, he is 
likely to suffer imprisonment for a considerable period to come. Mr. 
Tassey Stewart's simple-minded faith is the natural outcome of the state 
of affairs existing at Washington, as described by the newspapers. If 
any citizen of this Republic believes that he can get justice from the De- 
partments without money and without price, he must base his faith upon 
some occult imaginings not known to students of the daily press. 

The staple attraction in gentleman's clothing still continues to be 
the sale now going on at J. M. Litchfield & Co.'s, corner of Washington 
and Sansome streets. Their ready-made goods are hard to distinguish 
from the most expensive custom-made suits, and are being disposed of at 
a bargain. Any one now in need of a good cloth suit at a reasonable price 
should at once pay them a visit. Corner Washington & Sansome streets. 



The Second Report oj that excellent Institution, "St. J 
Youth ".i i' i ■ 

■i. 1 117 How trd iti 
statistics of the growth of I 1 1 lays : 

" Two thousand five hundred and fori rer sight 

per day, have presented themselfos and found places, linos Uarcfa I, 1876, 

whom 1,786 were born In California), an entered m 

1 d St it. - ; and the remaining 435 are of foreign birth. 

- tween * and [0 ye trs old; 727 < 

L0andl4; 1,475 bel id LB; and 290 between LB and 21, 01 

Catholics there are L823, Pro J ■ i 28, and 89 avow d ■ 

ious convictions i 1*267 bavi moth< i ■ only, 298 have fathers only, 667 have 

parents living, and 323 are orphans: 039 have never l d hired out, 

and to, of whom 9 were reared In this city, can neither read nor write. 
Surely this answers, in a measure, the question, "What to do with 
our boys," and the good that it has already done is|only, we trust, the 
shadow of what it will accomplish in the future. 

The Pantheon, 321 California street, that favorite resort of the weary, 
worn out stockbroker and the careful banker, has just passed into the 
hands of Friend Dawson, whose pleasant face has been a feature of the 
place For sis years. Mr. Dawson has bought out Mr. Wainwrfght, and 
started a hitherto unknown luxury to business men- -an afternoon lunch. 

This will consist of deviled crabs, clam chowder, lobster naiad, scolloped 

oysters, with a varied programme every day. Under Mr. Dawson's man- 
agement, with a supply of wines and liquors of th*- first class, die Pan- 
theon bi.ls fair to increase its great popularity as the talon det takmt for a 
good lunch and a quiet smile. 

There is nothing of such vital importance to the appearance of a 
person as a good set of le*th. Dentistry in America has reached a far 
higher, and more perfect degree of science than in any other quarter of 
the globe. The latest advance known to the prof ession is the celluloid 
plate, made by 1 >r. Jessup, corner of Sutter & Montgomery streets. These 
plates are not costly, as they can be 6tted for $20, but they are far supe- 
rior to vulcanite rubber, and are the color of the natural gum. 

Dr. J. M. Hiulcie, a graduate of the Medical Department University 
of New York, has received a license from the Eclectic Medical Society 
here. The New South Wales Government is very anxious that the 
Annapolis Institute (which Dr. Hinkle represents) should found a brat.ch 
hospital in Sydney similar to the one on Bush street, over which Dr. 
Hinkle presides. The Government, it is stated, have offered to contribute 
half the expenses. 

Peter Job, the San Francisco pioneer French chief cook and confec- 
tioner, advertise- his services as a teacher of the culinary art, fancy 
dishes and pastry. He is desirous of making arrangements with princi- 
pal- oi seminaries, schools and colleges, to teach classes of young ladies 
the art of cooking. His address is 2519 California street, and his adver- 
tisement will be found in another column. 

Joe Taylor's Comedy and Concert Company have been an agreea- 
ble diversion to the ordinary class of entertainment this week. Mr. Tay- 
lor has not been iu this city for eleven years, but is as Protean as ever. 
His family, consisting of his wife, two daughters and a son, display an 
amount of talent which to be appreciated iflust be seen. 

We would call attention to the card of Mr. Mallandnine, architect, 
in another column. Plans and specifications of public and private build- 
ings can be seen at his office, 318 California street. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. — The Rev. Dr. Scott, pastor, will preach Sunday at 11 a. m. and 
7i P. M. Public very cordially invited to attend. 

EARNESTNESS THAT IS WORTHY OF SPECIAL 
MENTION. 
Eearnest men are the want of the hour and of the country. Half- 
hearted, insincere, and at best indifferent men occupy positions that re- 
quire the whole-souled services of thorough-going citizens with well de- 
fined aims and purposes. From the schoolmaster, who is abroad in the 
land, to the President in the White House, more downright earnestness 
is what is wanted. Our City Fathers have no convictions save the one 
that it is personally advantageous to be on the make. Hence our streets 
are an abomination and our sewers a plague. Our City Prison and our 
County Jail are a disgrace to our so-called civilization, yet little quibbles 
are allowed to stand in the way of an effective remedy. No less than 
six hundred and twenty persons, some of whom have been guilty of no 
crime, but are simply detained as witnesses, are confined in those black 
holes, and all this whilst the House of Correction, capable of accommo- 
dating four hundred inmates, is almost empty. This state of matters has 
been going on for months, but our half-hearted Supervisors fail to remedy 
it. Our streets were allowed to go from bad to worse because of a squab- 
ble over a street sweeping contract. The sewerage was permitted to ac- 
cumulate and to become an alarming nuisance for a similar reason. If all 
be true, however, that we hear, there are some earnest men among the 
present Grand Jury. That body, we are told, are overhauling street 
contracts, insisting upon the House of Correction being applied to its 
proper purposes, and are making inquiries about the sewerage question. 
All this is a welcome surprise. These earnest men have our very best 
wishes. If they can succeed in galvanizing city officers into something 
like life they will well deserve the gratitude of the whole people. 

SANITARY NOTES, 
One hundred and twenty -five deaths occurred this week as com- 
pared with 121 last. There were 85 males and only 40 females. Forty- 
five were under 5 years ; 22 between 5 and 20 years ; 48 between 20 and 
60 years, and 10 over that age. Only three persons died of natural decay. 
Of the zymotics, 15 were smallpox, 27 diptheria, 1 whooping cough and 
1 typhoid fever. Of diseases of the brain, 2 were apoplexy, 1 congestion. 
1 paralysis, 2 hydrocephalus. Thirteen persons died of consumption, 8 of 
pneumonia, 4 of indefinite lung disease, 1 of bronchitis and 5 of croup, 
There were 5 deaths from acute inflammation of the stomach and bowels, 2 
from aneurism and 1 from hepatic abscess. There were 3 accidental 
deaths, 1 homicide and 2 suicides. Smallpox is again on the increase, 53 
fresh cases having been reported during the week, as compared with 17 
last week. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 17, 1877. 



THE VENUS OF MILO. 

[ Ed. N. L: If you know of anything lovlier than the enclosed, name it. 
Here's the dignity of Minerva, the fidelity and devotion of Andromache, 
and the fondness, passion and despair of Dido all combined. Yours, V.] 

Goddess of dreams ! mother of love and sorrow ! 

Such sorrow as from Love's fair promise flows, 
Such love as from Love's martyrdom doth borrow 

That conquering calm which only sorrow knows. 
Venus, Madonna ! so serene and tender, 

In thy calm afterbloom of life and love, 
More fair than when of old thy sea-born splendor, 

Surprised the senses of Olympian Jove. 
Not these the lips that with impassioned plaining 

Poured subtle heats through Adon's languid frame, 
'Till, over cheek and brow, their kisses raining, 

Thrilled to his heart, and turned its frost to flame. 
Thy soul transcending passion's wild illusion, 

Its fantasy, and fever, and unrest, 
Broods tenderly in Thought's devout seclusion, 

O'er some lost love-dream lingering in thy breast. 
Thy face seems touched with pity for the anguish 

Of earth's disconsolate and lovely hearts ; 
For all the lorn and loveless lives that languish 

In solitary homes and sordid marts ; 
"With pity for the faithlessness and feigning, 

The vain repentance and the long regret, 
The perfumed lamps in lovely chambers waning, 

The untouched fruit on golden salvers set ; 
"With pity for the patient watches yearning 

Through lovely casements over midnight moors, 
Thrilled by the echo of far feet returning 

Through the blank darkness of the empty doors; 
With sorrow for the coy, sweet birds that cherish 

In virgin pride Love's luxury of gloom, 
And. in their fair unfolded beauty perish. 

Fading like flowers that knew not how to bloom ; 
With sorrow for the ever blown pale roses 

That waist their perfumes on the wandering air ; 
For all the penalties that life imposes 

On Passion's dream, on Love's divine despair. 

WHO'S WHO IN 1877? 

The following interesting facts are taken from the well known little 
volume bearing the above title: 

The oldest member of Her Majesty's Privy Council is Viscount Strat- 
ford de Redcliffe, G. C. B., aged 89; the youngest, His Royal Highness 
Prince Leopold, aged 24. The oldest Duke is the Duke of Portland, aged 
77; the youngest, the Duke of Montrose, aged 25. The oldest Marquis is 
the Marquis of Donegall, aged 80; the youngest, the Marquis Camden, 
aged 5. The oldest Earl in the House of Peers is Earl Bathurst, aged 86; 
though the oldest bearer of that title is the Earl of Kilmorey, an Irish 
Peer, aged 89; the youngest is the Earl of Hopetoun, aged 17. The oldest 
Viscount is Lord Stratford de Redcliffe, aged 89; the youngest, Viscount 
Clifden, aged 14. The oldest Baron is Lord Chelmsford, aged 83; the 
youngest, Lord Southampton, aged 10. The oldest member of the House 
of Commons is the Right Hon. Joseph Warner Henley, M. P. for Ox- 
fordshire, aged 84; the youngest, the Hon. William O'Callaghan, M. P. 
for Tipperary, aged 25. The oldest Judge in England is the Right Hon. 
Sir Fitzroy Kelly, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer Division of the 
High Court of Justice, aged 81; the youngest is Sir Nathaniel Lindley, 
Justice of the Common Pleas Division, aged 49. The oldest Judge in 
Ireland is the Hon. James O'Brien, of the Court of Queen's Bench, aged 
71; the youngest, the Right Hon. Christopher Palles, LL. D., Lord Chief 
Baron of the Court of Exchequer, aged 46. The oldest of the Scotch 
Lords of Session is Robert Macfarlane, Lord Ormidale, aged 75; the 
youngest, Alexander Burns Shand, Lord Shand, aged 48. The oldest 
Prelate of the Church of England is the Right Rev. Alfred Olljvant, 
Bishop of Llandaff, aged 79; the youngest is the Right Rev. Edward 
Parry, Suffragan Bishop of Dover, aged 47. The oldest Prelate of the 
Irish Episcopal Church is the Right Rev. John Gregg, Bishop of Cork, 
aged 79; the youngest is his son, the Right Rev. Robert Samuel Gregg, 
Bishop of Ossory and Ferns, aged 43. The oldest Prelate of the Scotch 
Episcopal Church is the Right Rev. Robert Eden, Bishop of Moray and 
Ross, aged 73; the youngest, the Right Rev. George R. Mackarness, 
Bishop of Argyll - and the Isles, aged 54. The oldest Baronets are Sir 
Richard John Griffith and Sir Moses Montefiore, each aged 93; the 
youngest, Sir Henry Palk Carew, , aged 7. The oldest Knight is Field- 
Marshal Sir John Forster Fitzgerald, G. C. B., aged 91; the youngest, 
Sir Ludlow Cotter, aged 24. 



A PRACTICAL SUGGESTION. 
The "New York Times" has discovered a way of reaching the 
North Pole which is likely to be eminently satisfactory to our latest ex- 
plorers. It is that the track shall be first planned out and smoothed be- 
tween Smith's Sound and the Pole, and half-mile stations for rest and re- 
freshment erected. The sidewalks are to be properly swept and garnished, 
and a light is to be kept burning at night in the front kitchen window of 
each of these refuges for belated and weary explorers. A hero *' could 
warm his feet at one station, lunch at another, and sleep at a third." 
Supplementing this, we should propose that Arctic Twins be kept at each 
half-mile astablishment, so that there should not be too much strain on 
explorers' minds, and that medals and orders of the Bath should be handed 
round occasionally with the supper beer just to keep the determined 
pecker up, and show that Englishmen who live at home at ease are not 
gblivious of the hardships undergone by their never-to-be-turned-back or 
in-any-way-diverted heroes. Shares in the new movement are expected 
to be largely taken by those at present interested in Dr. Richardson's Hy- 
gejopoli?. 

There are more independent thinkers than independent actors. 



INSURANCE. 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 
HUTCHINSON, MANN & SMITH. 

NO 314 CALIFORNIA SXRKET, SAN FKANCISCO. 

AGENTS FOR TUB 

Franklin Ins. Co Indianapolis, Ind New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas St. Paul F. & M. Jus. Co.. .St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio I Atlas Ins. Co Hartford Conn. 

People's Ins. Co Newark, N. J. 1 Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

National L. I. Co., U. S. A..Wash'n, D. C. iGirard Ins. Co- Philadelphia, Pa. 

Capital Represented, Twelve U ilions. 
POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY aT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON, MANN A SMITH, General Agents, 
Dec. 5. 314 California street, San Francisco. 



HOME MUTUAL INSUEANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 
"V°- * oe California street, next door to Bank or California. 

Xyi Fire Insurance Company. Capital, $300,0u0. Officers : — J. F. Houghton, 
President ; Geo. II. Howard, Vice-President ; Charles R. Story, Secretary-. H. H. 
BIGELOW, General Manager. 

Directors.— San Francisco— Geo. H. Howard, F. D. Atherton.H. F. Teschemacher, 
A. B. Grogan, John H. Redington, A. W. Bowman, C. S. Hohbs, B. M. Hartshorne, 
D. Conrad, Wm. H. Moor, George S. Johnson, H. N. Tilden, W. M. Greenwood. S. L. 
Jones, George S. Mann, Cyrus Wilson, W. H. Foster, Jr., Joseph Galloway, W. T. 
Gatfatt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling. Oregon Branch— P. Wasserman, B. Gold- 
smith, L. F. Grover, D. Macleay, C. H. Lewis, Lloyd Brooke, J. A. Crawford, D. M* 
French, J. Lowenberg. Hamilton Boyd, Manager, W. L. Ladd, Treasurer. Marys- 
ville — D. E. Knight. San Diego — A. H. Wilcox. Sacramento Branch — Charles 
Crocker, A. Redington, Mark Hopkins, James Carolan, J. F. Houghton, D. W. Earl, 
Isaac Lohman, Julius Wetzlar; Julius Wetzlar, Manager; I. Lohman, Secretary. 
Stockton Branch— H. H. Hewlett, George S. Evans, J. D. Peters, N. M. On-, W. F. 
McKee, A. W. Simpson, A. T. Hudson, H. M. Fanning ; H. H. Hewlett, Manager ; N. 
M. Orr, Secretary. San Jose Branch— T. Ellard Beans, Josiah Beldeu, A. Pfister, J. 
S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, N. Hayes, Noah Palmer, B. D. Murphy , J. J. Denny, Man- 
ager ; A. E. Moody, Secretary. Grass Valley— William Watt, Robert Watt. Ne- 
va da— T. W . Sigourney. Feb. 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE— UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Lloyds.— Established in 1861.— Nos. 416 and 
■118 California street. Cash capital $750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECT< )KS. 
—San Frantisco — J. Mora Moss, James Otis, Mosses Heller, N. J. T. Dana, M. J. 
O'Connor, W. W. Montague, Daniel Meyer, Adam Grant, Antoine Borel, Charles 
Kohler, Joseph Seller, W. C Ralston, I. Lawrance Pool, A. Weill, N. G. Kittle, Jabez 
Howes, Nicholas Luning, John Parrott, Milton S. Latham, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, 
Joseph Brandenstein, Gustave Touchard, G. Brignardello, George C. Hickox, T. Ltili- 
men Meyer, J. H. Baird, T. E. Lindenberger. S.u'rajiknto— Edw. Cadwalader, J. F. 
Houghton, L. A, Booth. Marysville — L. Cunnigham, Peter Decker. Portlaxd, O. — 
Henry Failing. New York — J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, James Phelan. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. Oct. 26. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FIKE AND MARINE. 

C^ash Assets, Jan. 1st, 1876, 8478,O00.— -Principal Office, 
j 218 and 220 Sansome street, San Francisco. Officers : — Peter Donahte, Pres- 
sident ; A. J. Bryant, Vice-President ; Charles H. Cushinq, Secretary ; H. H. Wat- 
son, Marine Surveyor. Board of Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. 
O'Sullivan, A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailev, E. W. Corbert, 
George O. McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixlcy, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. 
Euuklcy, P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld. 
P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, O. W. Childs, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale, Maynt-ld. Pop. Rutherford, Sun Jose. Feb. 13. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of Iiife Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to overForRTEKN Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
April 23.] 313 Montgomery street, Nevada Block. 

HAMBURG-MAGDEBURG FIRE INSURANCE C0-, OF HAVBURG- 

This Company is now prepared to issue policies against 
Loss or Damage by Fire at current rates. Every risk taken by this Company 
is participated in by three of the largest German Fire Insurance Companies, repre- 
senting an aggregate capital and surplus of over SIXTY-FOUR MILLION MARK, 
equal to SIXTEEN MILLION DOLLARS, U. S. GOLD, thus enabling this Company 
to accept large lines. GUTTE & FRANK, General Agents, 
Sept. 23. 321 Battery street. 



OF BERLIN, 



BERLIN-COLOGNE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 
GERMANY. 

Capital, 6,000,000 Reich-Marks, 81,500,000 V. S. Gold Coin. 
Having been appointed General Agents for the Pacific Coast, we are now pre- 
pared to write Policies at the usual rates. -TIDEMAN, HIRSCHFELD & CO., 
Nov. 4. Office: No. 302 Sansome street, under W. F. &, Co.'s Bank. 

ESTABLISHED 1821. ~~ 

Capital, Gold 810,000,000. 

GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO., OF LO\DO\. 
Dec. 16 Agents : BA LFOUR, GUTHKIE & CO., 230 Calif or nia st. 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN 

Subscribed Capital, $15,000, 000 ; Accumulated Funds, up- 
wards of $0,750,000 ; Annual Fire Premiums, less re-insurance, $1,380,000. 
Losses promptly paid in United States Gold Coin. W. L. BOOKER, Agent, 

April 13. No. 319 California street, San Francisco. 

WESTERN ASSURANCE CO., OF TORONTO, CANADA. 

(lash Assets, $1,207, 483.— London Assurance Corporation, 
j of London, England. Cash Assets, $14,993,406.— Issue Policies of Insurance 
against loss by fire, at equitable rates. CROSS & CO., General Agents, 
Jan. 20. 316 California street. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 85,000,000.— Agents: Balfonr, Gntbrie A Co., No. 
£10 California street, San Francisco. No. 18. 

J. Craig. 



E. D. Edwards. 



E. L. Craig. 
CRAIG, EDWARDS & CRAIG, 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law. Land Suits and Patent Right 
Cases a Specialty. No. 240 Montgomery street, San Francisco California. 
[July 29.] 



, r 



rVl>. IT, 1877.] 



i AUKOKNIA ADVKKT1SBK 



TAIRTRS. 

b ni ■<■■]* n't moan ; ' Un bmndi 

In mist) n . aa hmiil in hand, 

■ft mini mnaio thaj their gaunboU pXayttL 

Mut.- arc th.ir \ ■ dull 

man within the cow ilip'a ball. 
In aoiTOW u » ti Tit.ihi.i ro 

On other ihoree with nil her elfin luu 
Nathli uJden nenrtha and home*, 

Our dnrUng babes our blue»eyed, fair haired sprite;*, 
Thee« dainty Aii.]-. u they climb nur ami 

With prattling tongues, and hearta ;*I 1 Ereah from heaven, 
Aesnrt- aa that the Cays, lik>- anmmer been, 

\«t Hit, where'er deiur ohildren hive been given. 

^ — Austin Griffin, 

WOMEN'S APPETITES. 
Among the many unal! injustices t*> whioh women arc subjected .it the 
one of the most sorely aggravating oon- 
csnu iii< ii-iii- ol their dauy diet. As children they cave usually as much 
liberty in this particular ;i* their brothers, excepting, perhaps, that, being 
nnder d Uii m, they devour fewer green currants >-i nn- 

rips blackberries; but from the day that they 'corns out 1 they an no 
lit-, and ar I utterly onhealthy want "f 

appetib 'She eata asmnchaa a man,' ia the condemnation unhesita- 
tingly pronounced on any _irl who, having walked fur mon than ia good 
[lor her with ■ party, or exhausted herself with an afternoon of 

bar 1 exercise at lawn tennis, ventures at dinner-time to allow that Bhe in 
really hungry, and to sat the food of which Bhe atanda in need. A little 
aoup, about a mouthful of some entree, bnt aa much cream, jelly, and ice 
ia what n lord of the creation deems amply suffi- 
cient for a woman who baa taken nearly a* much exercise during the day 
hk he has himself, merely because he cannot disabuse himself of the anti- 
quafc •! notion that it i* ' unfeminine 1 for ;i woman to eat enough bo sup- 
port nature. It was this unwritten but imperative social law against 
■it beinc openly partaken of by women which ted to 
of the modern meal of five-o'clock tea, with all its dis- 
, effects od the nervous system of its devotees, as a means of satis- 
fying the craving's uf hunger, ami enabling the fair sex to appear serenely 
t m> sublunary and prosaic a matter aa dinner. It gave rise also 
t«> the morning cupoi tea, with it- attendant pile of bread-and-butter, 
which, mi country houses well know, makes its way to the 

apartment of nine in ten of their lady-guests at --i-'lit o'clock, and enables 

them I nsible breakfast tit only for a dyspeptic 

Sparrow : t-> the sandwich and sherry at twelve o'clock, privately demol- 
ished upstairs, with the effect of causing the luncheon-hour to be a matter 
of indifference, and its consumption infinitesimal if spectators are pres- 
ent ; and to the somewhat substantial refection which is frequently par- 
taken of in the bedroom at night. 

The result of all these meals cannot but be disastrous: digestion 
becomes deranged and impaired, and proves one of the most fertile causes 
of the undue recourse to stimulants by women against which the grave 
Voice of medical warning has of late been frequently raised. And it is 
entirely the fault of the absurd creed set up by men ; in the exclusive 
nee of their own sex women eat rationally what they require, but 
have not generally the moral courage to set the opinion of their lords at 
defiance. It is the nature of women to do and suffer much to render 
themselves attractive to men: and they would probably regard the sup- 
pression uf their hunger, and the necessity of gratifying it in private and 
almosl by stealth, with as much equanimity as many other sacrifices made 
with a similar object But it is an aggravation of their deprivation to 
have to undergo teasing on the subject. A healthy, active girl, whose 
natural hunger not even hve-o'elock bread-and-butter has sufficed to stifle, 
ally allows dish after dish, of which Bhe would gladly partake, to 
pass her, and is rewarded by being told that 'she ought to take more ex- 
■ 1 1 i ■ ■ and get an appetite,' that 'ladies have such an unfair advantage in 
having five-o'clock tea,' the speaker forgetting most conveniently that he 
avails himself of the institution at every possible opportunity ; or, if her 
neighbor be elderly, 'he supposes she thinks it interesting not to be hun- 
gry, and only to eat that trash '—spoken contemptuously of the sweets. 
It ia not unnatural that she should feel somewhat wrathful, for she knows 
full well, from the remarks she hears made upon others, that, let what 
may be said to her, she must persevere in her abstinence if she would not 
be classed among those who are characterized as 'fast* and 'loud,' and 
who are as independent as to the satisfaction of their appetites as they are 
as regards any other social amenity. Those women whose chief ambition 
it appears to be to be occasionally mistaken for men have much to do with 
keeping up the creed of the iniquity of feminine hunger in the minds of 
those of the sterner sex sufficiently old fashioned to conceive that Provi- 
dence intended the two sexes to be diverse in their manners and customs, 
ami thereby perpetuate a sore grievance to their softer sisters. Those are 
the women who disdain anything but claret for breakfast, loudly profess 
their preference for 'devilled' bones, prefer braudv-and-soda to tea at 
five o'clock, are very critical of the champagne at dinner, talk loudly of 
the cuisine, and not seldom finish the evening in the smoking-room and 
with a 'gin-sling.' At kettledrums they require lobster-salad and cham- 
pagne, and at a garden-party are sure guides to the often remote refresh- 
ment tent. At balls their capacity for food is enormous, and wue be t© 
the partner who does not prove himself an adept in catering for them. 

It may be at once conceded that this sensual type is a worse evil than 
the suppressed appetites of ordinary women ; but surely there might be 
found a hapny medium, and those who are hungry might be permitted 
to eat in moderation without the terror of at once finding themselves 
branded as coarse and fast. The prejudice began long ago when it was 
not usual for women to devote themselves much to outdoor pursuits, and, 
as is generally the wont of prejudices, it has long survived its raison 
d'etre. A devotion to sedentary pursuits is the last charge that can be 
made against the ladies of the day ; indeed men would very often not be 
inconsolable if their fair friends insisted somewhat less persistantly on 
sharing their every amusement, and allowed tbem some short respite from 
the duty of making themselves agreeable. It must be surely conceded 



that the trihV and Jelly that ent f"ra young huly 
in the - 1 irn once <-r twice along the flow< i 
tbaexUntof conventional femah r for a damsel 

who is out all day, either riding to noun I with the guns ovsr 
round, or tasun In a hot sun nt lawn 
tennis. As a matter ol common wnse, it i- time that the Idas ■■! 
ing unfeminine for s woman to sat what she requires ahonld be regarded 
as an effete superstition, 77-. World, 
=-'■ ' ""■ " - - mi ■ ■■ 

BANKS. 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK. 

Incorporated lu ticiiovu. Bwltaerlanud, January Mffc, 1173. 
He. I "li, s'J.OOO.OIMt. -«i paid 

up President, hknky [Ikyi vh 

a Bertou, 5»7 Clay elroet Directors: FRANCIS BKRTON and KWtMiT 
w \w 

This Bank la pi at Letters of Credit on Europe, and t<> tranaad 

kind of Banking, MercantUi and Exchange Bualneaa, and to negotiate Amexi 
curltloa in Europe Deposits n alvi d 

Mills off Eaccdbuanare on Nan York, Philadelphia, London, Liverpool, l'arin, 
Lyons, Hani -. Bordeaux, Oloron, Bnuaela, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort, Qenova, 

Lausanne, Chaux<de Fonda, Neuchatel, Fril a/, Bern, tarn. Soleure, Baden, Basic, 

Zurich, wlnterthur, Shaffhausen, s i Dalian, Lucern, Ohur, Belllnsona, Locarno, Lu- 
gano, Uendriaio, Genoa, Turin, tulan, Florence, Rome. 

An AttHiiy Office fa annexed to the Bank. Aaaaya of gold, silver, quartz ores 
and lulphureta Returns in coin or bars, at the opti i the depositor. 

Advanosa undo on bullion and area bust ami bullion oan be forwarded from any 
part of the country, and retunu made through Wella, Fargo <v Co., or by checks. 
[September 1S.1 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FKANCISCO. 

Capital $5,000,000. 

D.O. MILLS President, i Was*. ALVOltD ...VHe-PreH'i. 

THOMAS BKOM'N Cashier. 

AeaHTfl : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Oalforaia ; Boston, Tremont National Hunk ; 
I'iii.'i--... i nioti National Hank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank ol New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank baa Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Hinfng Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all ]>arls of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Pctersbunrh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. -1 

THE NEVADA BANE, OF SAN FBANCISC0. 
Paid Up Capital $10,000,000. 

Louis McLane President. | J. C\ Flood. Vice-President. 

N. K. Mas ten Caahler. 

Dirrctors : — J. C. Flood, J. W Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, Jas. G. Fair, Louis McLane. 

Correspondents:— London— Smith, Payne v^ Smiths. Paria— 'HotUnguer & Co. 
Hamburg— Hesse, Newman & Co. New York— "The Bank of New York, B. N. A." 
Chicago— Merchants' National Bank. Boston— Second National Bank. New Orleans 
-—State National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to receive deposits on open account, issue certificates of de- 
posit, buy and sell exchange, purchase bullion, and transact a general banking busi- 
ness. Collections made and proceeds remitted at current rates of exchange. Oct. 9. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, 1). Callaghan ; Cashier, George W. Rodman ; Assistant 
Cashier, \V. Ritchie. 

DlSBCTOBS :— R- 0. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, James C. Flood, Edward Martin, James Moliitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Corresi-osdests— London : Baring Bros. & Co.; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London ami China. Dublin: Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Oo. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Cold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Contineut. Commercial 
Gredita issued available in Europe, Chita and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Dec. 13. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, 81,800,- 
000, with power to increase u> 910,000,000. Southeast corner California and Ban- 
Bome streets. Head Office— fi East India Avenue, London. Branches— Portland, Or- 

egon; Victoria am) Carihuo, British Columbia. 

Tliis Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Ottice and Branches, aud upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and Stiuth America : China and 
Japan — Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
Kaa tfew Zealand— Rank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Comi>any of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

Dec. 0. W. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANE (LIMITED). 

Capltp.1, 85,000,000, of which $3,u00,O00 is fully paid up as 
present capital. San Francisco Office, 424 California; London Office, 22 Old 
Broad street. President, >L S. LATHAM ; Manager, JAMES M. STREETEN ; Assist- 
ant. Manager, CAMILu MARTIN. London Bankers, Bank of England and London 
Joint Stock Bank ; New York Bankers, Drexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston Bankers, 
Third ' National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General 
Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Francisco, and between said 
cities and all parts of the world. October 23. 

THE ANGL0-CALIF0RNIAN BANK (LIMITID). 
4 £}<•) California street. San Fraueisco.--- London Office, 3 

~E/%/% Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
Anthorized Capital Stuck, -*o,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 



Credit available throughout the world. 
Oct 4. 



FRED. F. LOW, I „ 

IGN. STEINHAitT, j" aiana S ers - 



. THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BANK OF SAN FBANCTSC0. 

Capital. 85,000,000. — Vlvinza Hayward, President; R. O. 
Sneath, Vice-President; H F. Hastings, Cashier; R. N. Van Brunt, Secretary. 
Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers on all principal Cities. Collections made and a 
general Banking business transacted. August 22. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER 



AND 



Feb. 17, 1877. 



A SERIOUS APPEAL TO THE GRAND JURY. 
The last place in which oue would naturally look for wholesale rob- 
bery, swindling and fraud would be in the management of Savings Banks. 
These institutions ought, by every principle of honor, and by everything 
that is sacred in the conduct of human affairs, to be the very embodiment 
of the genius of Integrity. They are established for an exceptionally 
noble purpose. They are professedly the guardians of the hard-earned 
savings of the poorer many. Our sons and daughters of toil, enticed by the 
high-sounding title of "Savings Bank, 7 ' bring up the accumulations they 
have industriously gathered and implicitly entrust them to the safe keeping 
of officers bound by law to certain very rigid rules of action. Many sacri- 
fices have undoubtedly been submitted to in order to provide a fund that 
shall be a refuge when the days of sickness, old age or peril arrive. A strong 
will has resisted the temptations to needlessly spend money that are met 
with on every hand. It may even be that the body has gone ill clad and 
the stomach ill fed, and many another privation submitted to, so as to 
make provision for a growing family or for threatened calamities. It is 
an exalted, noble feeling, this, which induces the poor to struggle and to 
save, so as that tbey and theirs may be prepared for the misfortunes of 
which life is so prolific. Good government has no higher duty than to 
encourage that feeling and to protect it in its exercise. That kind of 
saving reduces pauperism to a minimum and increases manly independ- 
ence and general, widespread prosperity to a maximum. It prevents 
poverty and its accompaniment—crime. Every dollar thus saved is a 
dollar less required from the general community in support of almshouses, 
hospitals and prisons. Thus it comes that all wise governments cherish 
and promote the desire to save on the part of its individual and poorer 
members. In England, Parliament sanctioned a scheme of Mr. Glad- 
stone's by which PostoHices are made Savings Banks, and a fixed rate of 
interest is allowed which has proved some half per cent, in excess of what 
the money realizes to the Government ; so that a premium is paid for 
thrift by the general taxpayers, so desirable is it thought there to encour- 
age saving. In this State the law has conceived many wise safeguards, 
under which alone a Savings Bank may be legally conducted. It is made 
criminal for the Directors or other officers to be guilty of embezzlement, 
fraud or false entries. To misrepresent the amount of capital actually 
paid to allow stockholders to withdraw any part of the capital, to receive 
notes as evidence of capital actually required to be paid in, and to allow 
Directors or officers to become indebted to the Bank, are all very properly 
declared by the codes to be misdemeanors punishable by fine or imprison- 
ment. If two or more Directors or other officers combine together, and 
by false entries and frauds, skillfully covered up, succeed in cheating the 
Bank out of the whole or any part of its funds, they are guilty of a con- 
spiracy to defraud, and may be put on their trial together as the band of 
rascals'that they are. If any or all of these things have occurred anywhere 
within the limits of the jurisdiction of any Grand Jury having legal existence 
within this State, then that body has a clear, unmistakable and sacred 
duty to perform, that cannot honestly or with justice to their oaths be 
evaded or avoided. Has any such case or cases arisen and now demand- 
ing inquiry at the hands of the present Grand Jury of this city and 
county? We have no hesitation in saying that there has. Furthermore, 
we demand of the Grand Jury to be called before it, and to be permitted 
to give the names of witnesses who, under oath, will disclose facts of em- 
bezzlement, fraud and wholesale swindling unparalleled by any Bank de- 
falcations which have come within our knowledge during a long and 
eventful life. 

THE END IS NIGH, BUT WE ARE NOT SAVED. 

The confusion worse confounded that has been perversely and 
wickedly created by the dishonest count of the Presidential Electors is 
nearing its end, and we are glad of it for many reasons, not the least of 
which is that we are sick and tired of writing upon a subject that has not 
one bright or cheerful side to it. The whole thing has been shapen in sin 
and conceived in iniquity. From the hour at which the polls closed un- 
til now the whole country has been flooded with lies, falsifications, frauds, 
and evidences of partisanship run mad. None have been found high 
enough to render an honest judgment, and none have been too low to es- 
cape the demoralizing influence of the debasing ordeal through which the 
country has been passing. The Electoral Commission has practically 
ended its work. When the Florida decision was reached the business was 
virtually over. He must, indeed, have been a sanguine man who sup- 
posed that there remained anything further to do. Eight partisans against 
seven gave evidence of the side to which they belonged, and that substan- 
tially determined the whole matter. It is true that it was supposed that 
an impartial tribunal had been called into existence that would hear testi- 
mony and determine the truth from a love of it. We now know that noth- 
ing lias been determined except that might is right. Fraud, if successful, 
who dares call it fraud ? That is the sum total of the conclusion reached 
bv this high and mighty Commission. The Florida case presented every 
phase of evidence in support of the Tilden side. Every legal State 
authority had determined it in one way. The newly elected Governor, 
the Legislature, the Republican Congressional Representative, the Repub- 
lican State Supreme Court, and, at last, even the partisan Returning 
Board declared that Tilden had an undoubted majority. All this was to 
no purpose. No amount of testimony must be a feather's weight against 
the certificate of Ex-Governor Stearns. Truth, honor and justice are as 
nothing, whilst fraud is everything. This rule some are foolish enough to 
suppose will be applied to the Oregon case. We are persuaded that will 
turn out to be a mistake. The die is cast, and the eight partisans will do 
their work to the end. Hayes will be declared elected and will be in- 
augurated, though in truth and in fact he is in a minority of both the 
electoral and the popular votes. There has been much talk about the 
horrors of " Mexicanization," but the evils we have reached, are, if possi- 
ble, worse than the doings in Mexico. Diaz has secured power without 
any false pretenses. His has been the open avowal that might is right. 
Bad as that is, it is infinitely better than the sneaking, demoralizing pre- 
tense that lying, swindling and fraud are right. The way of Diaz is 
vastly the more open, candid and honest way. It looks as if for the next 
four years we shall have a President made so by methods, which along- 
side of those resorted to by Diaz are incomparably despicable. There, 
however, may be this comfort in store for us, Hayes may prove superior 
to the tricks by which the Presidency has been secured for him. 

Brokers are buying half dollars at 6(a':6^ per cent, discount, and are 
selling them at 5£@5g! per cent, discount. 



OUR SEWERS. 

"When'er I take my walks abroad " Tho* really why they should lament 
I always hold my nose ; Is somewhat hard to say ; 

Our streets not having, so to speak, For loafing does'nt clean the streets, 
Although it draws the pay. 



The odor of the rose ; 

For every kennel has its own 

Exclusive, private smell ; 

And every sewer seems to be 

A breathing-hole of helL 

On here a rake and there a broom 

A few poor loafers lean, 

Lamenting what hard work it is 

To keep the gutters clean. 



But while I watch these sons of toil, 
A solemn hearse goes by, [form 

And I seem to see the cold, white 
Which in its depth doth lie, [words: 
And a hollow voice moans low these 
" The sewer's fetid breath [brooms 
Hath brought me here — those idle 
Are working hard for Death." 



TO DISTRICT ATTORNEY MURPHY. 
This city and county has a District Attorney whose abilities are 
above the average. That he is possessed of an honest, conscientious de- 
sire to do his whole duty, we have, as yet, no reason to doubt. Indeed, 
we have had much personal cause to know that he can be a most active, 
zealous and pains-taking officer. He did, at least, all that was required of 
him to procure indictments against the News Letter. So far from employ- 
ing one word of censure against him for that, we accord him credit for ex- 
ceptional earnestness in the discharge of a duty imposed upon him by his 
official oath. Complaints coming regularly before him, from whatever 
quarter, demand his best attention. We go even further and say that 
whether formal complaint be made or not, if he has good reason to believe 
that crime has been committed, and that the proofs thereof are available, 
it is his bounden duty to bring the same to the notice of the Grand Jury, 
of which he is the sworn legal adviser. In this country the common law, 
in re=pect to private prosecutions, has been wisely set aside in favor of a 
statute law which insists upon prosecutions being conducted by and on 
behalf of the people by a public officer in the pay of the people. It is 
made his duty to prosecute wrong-doers, because public interests, and not 
private malice, demand it. In that view of the functions of his office, 
which we submit is the true, legal and common sense one, it is obviously 
his duty to prosecute great offenders against large public interests, and if 
their offenses have become notorious he ought to set the law in motion 
with or without formal complaints. That he entertains the same view of 
his duties is evidenced by the fact that he has ere now pursued the exact 
course we are suggesting. We call his attention to the article entitled, 
"A Serious Appeal to the Grand Jury," and beg leave to ask him 
whether he is prepared to enter upon the difficult but imperative duty de- 
manded of him by the class of facts we therein disclose ? In order, how- 
ever, that there may be no mistake about the matter, we tell him that 
high crimes and misdemeanors have been committed; that we are pre- 
pared to name the offenders, and to place in his hands overwhelming 
proofs, and that whatever formal action may be required to set the law in 
motion, we are ready, in the public interest and as good citizens, to take. 
Where wholesale frauds, extending over a period of two years, have been 
committed, and where intricate entries are skillfully made with the intent 
of covering up wrong, the prosecuting officer necessarily has to bring to 
bear more than ordinary patience and perseverance. But in proportion 
to the bad skill used in covering up wrong, so ought to be the ratio of the 
wisdom and energy of the prosecutor of evil. An indictment against a 
burglar is according to a stereotyped form, and therefore is easily pre- 
pared. Burglars, therefore, seldom escape indictment. Bank conspira- 
tors are masters of the art of book-keeping, which District Attorneys are 
not, hence business frauds rarelyreceive official attention, and the greatest 
rascals of the age go unwhipped of justice. But in the case to which we now 
draw the attention of the District Attorney, all the work has been pre- 
pared to his hand. The felonies and misdemeanors stand stripped of their 
skillful coverings, and stand out in all their hideous deformity of design 
and execution. Will District Attorney D. J. Murphy do his whole duty 
in the premises? We believe he will. Moreover, we don't intend that he 
shall escape it, even if he would. 

CANNOT CREDIT IT. 
A distinguished member of the New York Bar Association has 
sent to us for a copy of the decision rendered by Judge Wheeler, grant- 
ing a perpetual injunction against the publication of future libels. It 
appears that our criticism of a Wheeler injunction fell into the great law- 
yers hands and excited his curiosity to know precisely what had occurred. 
He thinks our illustrations " are racy and telling in the extreme, if 
any such injunction has been issued as you seem to describe, but it appears 
incredible that the well established principles which underlie the freedom 
of the press should be so violently set aside. Not until I receive the full 
text of the decision can I believe that your comments have a serious pur- 
pose." Nowonder that area! lawyer finds himself unable to credit that a 
Judge has been found ignorant and incapable enough to do this thing. 
But the fact remains nevertheless. We have duly forwarded a copy of 
the decision which is destined to make Wheeler the most notorious Judge 
in the United States. We have, furthermore, taken an appeal to the Su- 
preme Court of this State. It requires but little legal lore to determine 
what the result will be. The charter of our liberties, the State Constitu- 
tion, expressly guarantees the right which the high-handed proceedings of 
a District Judge has deprived us of. If "every person may freely speak, 
write and publish his sentiments upon all subjects, being responsible to 
the law for the abuse of that right," and if " no law shall be passed to 
restrain or abridge the liberties of the press," then there is no color of 
law whatever for a Wheeler injunction, and the Judge who issues one 
seems either incapable of understanding English or otherwise he wilfully 
defies it. We notice with some curiosity that the Bulletin and Call select 
Wheeler as the Judge before whom to try their libel litigation. There is, 
we fear, much significance in this fact. Why not choose an older and 
sounder Judge, whose decisions would carry moral force with them? 
Why, even if a verdict is obtained, endanger it by the bad law of a Judge 
whose decisions are almost daily being set aside? Is there an unexpressed 
but none the less reliable understanding between Wheeler and the But- 
letin ! Certainly, whether there is or not, his injunction against the 
News Letter was just what the Bulletin desired. It knows and privately 
avows that the thing is illegal, but rejoices because it temporarily serves 
its purpose. It has many tools ; has it a Judge amongst them? 

Trade Dollars are quoted in this market at 100 buying and 1001 selling. 



IVI.. 17, 1877. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

*On» that will t-U> the -l.-nl. air. with >> u ." 



With a desire tn know all about the Spring Valley watei question, 

I traveler and -< lentist, I hr. 

x I niversitie*, M. I v. el 

tint in the uu filtered 

i of the laboratory, when 

■ x lii hi tit animals apparently the 

ims .-I i tinka "All that filtration 

" i' i" keep out figurative mastodons, hippotaini, 

re -'-''ii -.'<ui 
ituly alxmi w « hich are not i unble to the naked eye. and 

opinion tlmt they are very useful in helping 

tion. n I by thousands of our fellow citizens 

tated this weak on the water question* I tar. P. 

. dead fly or a noose or a beetle in the water, take 

them out, unli n you tie partial to them. W hat yon can't §ee won't hurt 

Sum if you are at all doubtful, shut your eyes while yon an drink- 
:." Uany sensible persona, the P. C. among them, who ha/e hitherto 
\ thai water was only useful for bathing, brushing the teeth, wash- 
-. boiling meat or mixing whisky, are much surprised at the 
making about an article hitherto 
so tittle tasted in the community. If scientists can only prove thai " red 
ire .\s stimulating as old rye, the whisky trade will be rained, and 
many to whom the taste of water i* as yet unknown wQl adopt it as a 

Valentine's day is alwayi a happy day for the T. C, nn«l never passes 
without many little mementoes of the good old SSsint The early letter 
carrier tbu yi him no lace bedecked missives, but about half- 

past nine the faithful All Tong, who has done our washing tor four 
months without any coin in sight, came to greel us. !!<■ bowed himself 
out with the remark that we were " a heap d n thief." and our second 
ae was already to hand in the Bhape of a cupid-like corner i 

man, who had been feeble enough in 'lay.-* gone by t.. part with bis g la 

without money and without price, A valentine from aweary tailor, an out- 
raged 1 tmaker, ami a man who na rat shirts, made the morning 

rrily til! luncheon time, when the trustful restaurant keener 

banded us another missive in honor of the day, containing a request that 

s valentine, or else pay up three week's board. 

The weather was all that could be desired and an imaginative mind could 

almost see the good old Saint peeping out of the blue sky anil smiling at 

the universal joy his feast oca sioned. 

If the etories about the <«aikwar of Baroda are true, it-iuust be an 

tve thing for a Prince to be sick. For a slight indisposition he 

pulverises a lot of rubies and eats them in the form of a Hue powder 

sprinkled over cake;*. Pulverised diamonds are an infallible but painless 

poison, ami the Gaikwar often invite* hi.- enemies tu i.l i ne on them. The 

iiggests politely to si. me of our rich Californian families that they 

should not be outdone by the Gaikwar of Baroda or of any other place. 

In fact, it is their bonnden duty to chew up a few bracelets every time 

indisposed. IHssolved pearls are an excellent cure for bilious- 

ad a string or two would make no difference tn the dwellers on Nob 

Hill after a too heavy -upper. The T. C, will be happy to show any of 

mir local magnates how to pulverize rubies and dissolve pearls free of 

charge, ami in all cases they can rely on his integrity in preparing this 

jewel diet for their ailments at the shortest notice. 

A celebrated divine who converts souls, makes election stump 

hea. and is agent for an insurance company, recently got a letter 

from a sinner whom he had converted, saying : I can never repay you 

in time or eternity what I owe you." The faithful minister replied by 

return mail : " Von owe me nothing ; there is one who will place it to my 

account. Accept my receipt in full for anything wherein you may think 

you are Indebted to me." The young man treasured the note and often 

wept over it. Se know he was insured in the Doctor's earthly insurance 

company for a quarterly premium of $33, and every time the collector 

came round lie merely showed him the divine's receipt. The collector 

"placed it to the Doctor's account* 1 and marveled at his charity, and now 
the young man Lb dead and the company is out §5,000 insurance, in addi- 
rix quarterly payments which were accurately and carefully deb- 
ited against the pious agent. 

The dailies seem to thiuk it something very extraordinary that Mrs. 
Jennet 15. Frost should have argued her own case, this week, before the 
Supreme Court. Where the cause for surprise comes in, it is difficult to 
see. Women will argue their own cases anywhere and in a thousand dif- 
ferent ways— with kisses, caresses, tears and sighs, broomsticks, coffee- 
pots, plates i*nd legs of chairs ; on their knees pleading, on the sofa faint- 
in..', with their fingers tight in a man's hair or their nails clawing his nose ; 
with hysterics, sulks, favors, snubs, oglings, passions and persuasion — but 
wherever there is ;l woman she will argue her own case, whether it is in 
the Supreme Court of California or the back-parlor of a one-story tene- 
ment house. Logic she may never have heard of, rhetoric she may de- 
spise, but argue sne can to the last, and the best definition ever given of 
the confusion of the tower of Babel is at once supplied by the idea of two 
women talking at once. 

In the face of the great depression of trade caused by the unsettled 
Presidential question, it is sad to read in the Bulletin of Thursday last 
the awful news that "the mud-hens of Sutterville and Riverside lakes 
have done and are doing much damage to the grain in the fields adjoin- 
ing." The community is not prepared for such a blow as this, and it only 
wants another announcement to the effect that rabbits are on the increase 
in Los Angeles county, to precipitate California into hopeless bankruptcy. 
Better had we heard that the rats had eaten up the whole of the Corn- 
stock Lode, than that this mud-hen item should have burst upon us so 
suddenly and so cruelly. 

In a recent issue notice was given in the Toicn Cririer of a plot to 
relieve the Nevada Bank of some of its coin. We remarked : " We de- 
cline, of course, to give the names of the intending participants, but if it 
only comes off successfully the bloated monopoly will be broken up, the 
T. C. will have a new silk hat and rafts of coin, and Con. Virginia will be 
immediately boosted up to $700 again to make good the loss." With the 
simple statement that the T. C. possesses a new hat, and a reminder to our 
readers that the Nevada Bank was lately eased of §18,486, all further 
allusion to the matter must here cease. 



The Napoleon Club i« th.« 1*1 Tbs 

■ols qualification foi 

likeness to tfa man berahip was 

considerably .i pplical Ion ol 

beaded youth «dli • w the club. He "•■- Ini 

tint do one bni gentlemen with large aquiline noses and a very itsrn look 
about tin- mouth, could possibly be admitted The discomfited applicant 
retired with the determination of setting the necessary kind of nose if !■«■ 
could only find out what it was. Bo he waylaid ■ boy neaf m 

;■ II him the moaning of aquiline, 
which, with the help of a Latin dictionary, was found □ aqua. 

water, and meant ■ nose with a ■■■■ ' ilr ana 

square," murmured the would-be Napoleonist. " It's a whisk] i 
have, anyway, and ■ fool I olufa a> 

\nd be shook his head and went and took a drink. 

John Smith writ ' for condolence. He desires to 

make known through these columns that be is blighted for life and a 
wretched being, all through bis surname being Smith and bis christian 
name John. 'If I ever become great," h" writes, " what will it avail 
me, while there are thousands of insignificant John Smithsea ready to 
steal my thunder?" To console this particular -John Smith, who !■- at 
ambition into a dame under the dispiriting occupation 
of washing dishes in a restaurant, the T. V. would inform him that he 

should be a very happy man. If he ever becomes great, a servile L 

ture will gladly changeius name for him to Washington Columbus or Adams 

■ iit'hiy. uh-rea-s should J. s. adopt a burglarious career, or wile 
a way his time with raising checks and forging signatures, the title of John 

Smith will be his greatest comfort in the hour of his dishonor. 

Mou petit chou, as all the world knows, is a very delicate term of 

endearment among French i pie, although Monsieur Francois Lallevert 

has every reason to regret the use of the expression, Se was engaged 

some years ago to be married tO One of the daughters of the late wealthy 
Commodore, and the course Of true love ran quite smoothly until one 
unhappy day he wrote his finances a letter commencing " UCon bien-aime 1 
chou. The young lady had struggled Bomewith the language of 
the Parisians and possessed a dictionary. The result of her investiga- 
tions only brought to light the obnoxious fact that her intended addressed 
her as bin " w*U-beloved small cabbage," and it took five minutes bo col' 
leet all his letters and return his presents by an elder brother who ex- 
tracted an apology by means of a horse- whip, and left the unhappy 
fi !•: i . oer forever desolate and ignorant of his offense. 

It appears from the columns of an Eastern exchange on the Atlantic 
coast that they have a fog-bell which is of no more use than a boiled 
carrot hung in a boot leg. If that community desire* to confer a blessing 
on this city, it will immediately swap fog signals with us, and in return 
for the incomparable boon of the soothing tintinnalmluui of which they 
complain, we will guarantee to forward them the most demoniacal 
murder-shrieking, wail-of-the-damned, agony-creating fog horns that ever 
tormented a somnolent population. Ships can hear it for ten miles, 
babies often expire at its first blast, and we can recommend it as a good 
first class, respectable fog-horn, which will keep the inmates of a deaf 
asylum awake all night. 

Mr. Biggs, the individual who shot himself this week in a rifle gallery 
because he was going blind, displayed an amount of foresight hardly recon- 
cileable with the insanity of his last act. He was, of course, crazy, else 
he would not have tried to blow his brains out, and he was eminently 
sensible to know that if he once became blind he could never see to take 
good aim at himself. Again, had he waited for his eyesight to go, he 
never could have found his way to a shooting- gallery or had any excuse 
for trifling with firearms. Lastly, if he had gone it blind he might have 
raised the bystanders out of sight without giving them a show for their 
money, which would have been manifestly unfair. Under the circum- 
stances, Mr. B. did the square thing. 

Education is at a terrible discount in San Francisco just now. The 
dailies teem with advertisements from " professors " who. will teach Span- 
ish. German, French, the banjo, piano, organ, theology, mathematics, 
book-keeping and vocal music in 24 lessons fur the sum of $5. Not to be 
outdone the T. C. will teach Chinook, Chinese, Sanscrit, plain cooking, 
and the Jew's harp for §1 50 a month, and throw in lessons on the has 
soon and the double trapeze for seventy-five cents additional. He is in 
possession of the worst testimonials from the most immoral clergymen 
and school-teachers in Texas regarding his ability to do everything else 
except what he professes, and will guarantee to make every pupil perfect 
or keep the money. 

The latest style of advertising is for a firm to offer §500 reward for 
the conviction of an imaginary somebody who is supposed to have circu- 
lated rumors about its solvency. It is a good idea, and the T. C. adopts 
it. He will give a reward of §1,000 (United States some sort of coin) 
for such information as will lead to the arrest of the parties who planned 
and circulated a report that he was not open to invitations to French din- 
ners and '* long lunches." Such reports are cowardly outrages and proceed 
from deliberate malice, as all interested parties can prove for themselves 
Signed: T. C, No. .It) Cornhill London No. 3 Rue Scribe, Paris, and 
615 Merchant street, San Francisco. 

One of Casebolt's conductors is a graduate of Harvard College, 
and, it is said, is rapidly accumulating a large fortune in his new voca- 
tion of clipping tickets. He regards himself algebraically as X — an in- 
definite quantity, of which it is very hard to find the value, and he 
knocks down all the dimes and quarters he can, out of his uld luve for the 
classics, which taught him, in days gone by, " Fortuna fortibus favet " — 
none but the brave deserve the fare. 

Without entering into the merits of the water controversy in which 
Mr. Pickering has played so important a part, it is easy to see why the 
question interests that old gentleman. Not that he has any use for it 
now, but he feels that there is a hot hereafter where a pint of the impurest 
water that ever ran through a faucet will be of more interest to the editor 
of the Cull than the whole of the San Andreas reservoir is at present. 

Mr. Solomon Isaac R— — announces in the pergonals of a morning 
paper that he has arrived in San Francisco and would like to see his 
brothers. If Solomon will call at this office and exhibit a plethoric bank 
account and a disposition to be generous to his own flesh and blood, the 
T. C. will give him ample proof that he is his only surviving relative, and 
has long been yearning to meet him. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER 

» = 



AND 



Feb. 17, 1877. 



- ! 



THE HEART SKEIN. 

Slip, yes, slip your skein, my Kitty, 

O'er my hands, and wind, aud wind, 
All the while with little pity, 

Tangling, tangling heart and mind. 
Kitty! eyes upon the wool! 
Not on me, my beautiful! 
Now you drop your eyes completely, 

Winding, winding dreamily ; 
Wherefore, wherefore smile so sweetly 

On a thing that cannot see ? 
If you must smile, smile this way! 
I will bear it as I may! 
Ah! the rosebud fingers flitting 

Swift about the colored ball! 
How my heart beats time while sitting; 

Still I try to bear it all. 
Kitty, do you know or care 
'T is my heart you're winding there ? 
Kitty, I am in a vision! 

All the world to mist doth die ; 
Only, in an air Elysian, 

Little fairy fingers fly. 
Surely, if they flit too near, 
I shall catch and kiss them, dear! 
Tangled! pout not, frown not, Kitty! 

Though I gladly bear the pain ; 
For your anger is so pretty, 

It may make me sin again. 
There! 'tis well! Now wind and wind, 
Tangling further heart and mind! 
Now 'tis done! The last thread lingers 

Sadly from me, slow to part ; 
Canst thou see that in my fingers 

I am holding up my heart ? 
Wind and wind! I do not care! 
Smile or frown, and I will bear! 

Ah! so fast and quick you wind it, 

I no more can keep it miue ; 
Do you wonder that you find it 

Throbbing now close, close to thine ? 
Taugled, tangled are the twain: 
Kiss, kiss, kiss them free again! — Buchanan. 



CHINESE EMBASSY TO ENGLAND. 

The Chinese Embassy, of the composition 
and movements of which we have from time to 
time given particulars, has arrived in England. 
It may be interresting at the present moment to 
place before our readers the opinion which is ex- 
pressed of the Ambassador Kuo, by one of the 
most competent judges on the subject, namely 
Sir Thomas Wade, Minister at Peking. In a 
dispatch which he addressed to the Earl of Der- 
by, when the Embassy was first spoken of in 
China, he writes as follows: "Mr. Hart, who 
sees him to great advantage, has formed a high 
opinion of the Envoy Kuo, as a man of honesty, 
clearness of sight, and determination ; and this 
without forgetting that the Envoy is always a 
Chinese, and that the chief purpose of his con- 
fidence is probably to obtain light as to the con- 
duct of the Yunnan affair. On the other side, 
we must not forget the remarkable line taken by 
the Envoy Kuo in 1859, when he denounced 
Prince Tsenjjolinsin for having opened fire upon 
us ; nor the character that has clung to him of 
being an original and determined man." On the 
whole, we may conclude from the facts stated in 
the above extract that the chief Ambassador is 
likely to appreciate the importance of his post 
and to use his endeavors earnestly and fairly to 
maintain the friendly relations between England 
and China. His colleague, Lui-Si-Hing, is also 
well spoken of. It is worthy of note that the 
present Embassy comes direct to England, that 
is, without visiting any Continental Courts, and 
that having taken the P. and O. steamer to Gib- 
raltar, nearly all the ports they have touched at 
have been British. At Malta and Gibraltar the 
Envoys were received with due ceremony. At 
the former port, at which they arrived on the 
12th, they were saluted, and had the customary 
honors extended to them; and at Gibraltar, 
which they reached on the 16th ult. , they landed, 
and were received by Lord Napier of Magdala, 
Governor and commander-in-chief. The recep- 
tion wa3 held at tre Government House, in pres- 
ence of the Staff and the heads of the civil and 
military departments, and his Excellency and 
the members of the Embassy drove round the 
Rock and visited the galleries. 

Some doubts have been expressed in the com- 
ments in contemporary papers whether the pres- 
ent Embassy will really tend to create a more 
enlightened feeling in China, we have reason to 
believe that this will prove to be the fact— there 
can be no question that the advance which has 
been made in dispatching it is one of a very im- 
portant character, and that it will tend more 
than anything that has happened for many years 
past to cement friendly relations between the 
two countries. 



Liabilities of a Telegrapb4Compsuy.— The 

Judges of the Common Pleas Division have had 
before them a case in which a firm of merchants 
sued Eeuter's Telegraph Company for loss occa- 
sioned through their naving acted upon a tele- 
gram which had been sent tn them by mistake. 
The Court held that the Telegraph company 
did not guarantee everybody against the delivery 
of messages to the wrong persons, even though 
those messages had to go to the remotest parts 
of the earth. To impose such a responsibility 
would be to hold that there was a greater liabil- 
ity than the law could imply from the nature of 
the company or the business carried on by them. 
Judgment was therefore for the defendants. 
— London Times. 



A gentleman residing in Chambers in Lin- 
coln's -inn -fields has applied in the Westminster 
County Court for an injunction to restrain an- 
other resident in the same house from playing an 
organ. The applicant said he was engaged in 
literary work, and whenever the organ played it 
so annoyed and interfered with him that he was 
compelled to go out. Occupants of other cham- 
bers bore testimony to the inconvenience experi- 
enced in consequence of the playing upon the in- 
strument. The judge said the nuisance was in- 
tolerable, but was not actionable. 



Jean Ingelow thus briefly and beautifully 
tells the whole story of life: 

"Sweet is childhood — childhood's over ; 
Kiss aud part. 
Sweet is youth ; but youth's a rover — 

So's my heart. 
Swfeet is rest ; but all my showing 

Toil is nigh. 
We must go. Alas the going ! 
Say, 'Good-bye.'" 

A live gorilla has arrived in England. He is 
called a "baby," although he is already three 
feet in hight. On his arrival twenty-five hun- 
dred dollars was at once offered for him, and re- 
fused, a much higher price being demanded, on 
the ground that he resembles man more than 
any gorilla yet discovered. It is thus apparent 
that the more closely a monkey resembles a man 
the more he is worth ; while the rule has to be 
reversed to work the other way, for, by common 
consent, the more a man resembles a monkey the 
less he is good for! — Australian Journal. 

The revolver of Elizur Colburn, of Stafford 
Springs, aged 28, went off in his rear breeches 
pocket, lately, shattering his leg, which must be 
amputated. 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing Sunday, Feb. 11th, 1877. and until 
farther notice, Trains and Boats will Leave 
San Francisco: 
(Overland Ticket Office, at Ferry Landing, foot of 
Market Street.) 



7f\f\ A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Washing- 
• "U ton St. Wharf) — Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stage connection for Sonoma, Calistoga, Wood- 
land, Williams, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 

(Sundays excepted) for Woodland, Williams and 
Knight's Landing. (Arrive San Francisco 8:10 p.m.) 



8AA A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
• VJU land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding and Portland (0.), Colfax, Reno, Ogden and Oma- 
ha. Connects at Gait with train arriving at lone at 
3:40 p.m. (Arrive San Francisco 5:3f> p.m.) 



3fif\ P-M. (daily) San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
• "v land Ferry), stopping at all Way Stations. Ar- 
rives at San Jose at 5:30 P.M. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



for Latlirop, Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall, San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara, 
"Los Angeles," Wilmington, Anaheim, San Diego, Col- 
ton and Indian Wells (Arizona Stage Connection). Con- 
nects at Niles with train arriving at San Jose at 6:55 
p.m. " Sleeping Cars " between Oakland and Los Ange- 
les. (Arrive San Francisco 1:2:40 p.m.) 



4AA P. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Washington 
• yjyj St. Wharf), connecting with trains forCalistoga, 
Woodland, Williams, and Sacramento; and at Sacramen- 
to with Passenger Train, leaving at 9:15 p. M. for 
Truckee, Reno, Carson and Virginia City. "Sleeping 
Cars " between Vallejo and Carson. 
(Sundays excepted) for Napa and Calistoga. 

(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 A.M.) 



4AA P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
• \J\J (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking the third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sac- 
ramento at 9:00 a.m., daily. 

(Arrive San Francisco 8:00 P.M.) 



4 0A P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
• O" modatiori Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 11:15 a.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 7:30 a.m. 



FERRIES AN D LOC AL TR AINS. 
From "SAW FRAVCISCO." 



(K 7.1,0 
7.30 
8.0*) 
8.30 
9.00 
9.30 
10.00 
11.00 
12.00 
> 1.00 
2.00 
3.00 



Si 



(A (i.10 
I Pll.45 



"g 4? - 11.30 
■ji 5 ( rl-2.3 



• 3.30 
4.00 
4.30 
5.00 
5.30 
6.00 
6.30 
7.00 
8.10 
9.20 
10.30 



a 7.00 
8.00 
9.00 
10.00 
12.00 
P 2.00 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



p -3.00 
*7.00 
*8.I0 

♦11.45 



All.00 

p 1.30 
*10 30 



>> 



A 7.30 
8.30 
9.30 

p 1.00 
3.30 



6.30 
7.00 
S.10 
9.20 
10.30 



A U.10 

11.00 
P 11.45 



a 10. 30 
11.30 

P 12.30 






A 8.00 
t9.30 
rtl.00 
3.00 
4.00 
tS.10 



g 

3 3 



A 8.00 
t9. 30 

p 3.00 
4.00 
tS.10 



J 7.30 


11.00 


r 400 


5.00 


0.00 






i|-2 






u 


A 8.30 



A 9.00 

12.00 

p 1.30 



To FERNSIDE— except Sundays— 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 A.M., 
and 5 p. M. 



To "SAJT FKAXC'ISCO." 



(i. 7.30 
10.30 
4.00 
5.00 
0.00 



ei f 



A 7.00 
S.03 
9.00 

p 3.00 
4.00 1 
5.00 1 
6.0S| 

•10.00 






AtG.45 
7.55 
11.15 

til. 45 
3.40 



-■-■£ 



At7.03 
8.15 
11.35 

ptrios 

4.03 

t4.45 



FROM ALAMEDA. 



A*5.00 


All. 30 


p-3.20 


•5.40 


p>1220 


•7.20 


»10.20 


1.30 


•S.30 



D 



A 9.00 
12.00 
1.30 



FROM ALAMEDA. 



AlO.O0|All.O0|Pl2.OO 
I I LOO 



A 6.40 
7.40 
8.40 
9.40 
10.40 

P12.40 
2.40 
4.40 
5.40 
6.40 
7.50 
9.00 
10.10 



A 5.10 
5.50 



All.40 
p 1.25 



OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 



a 6.50 
7.20 
7.50 
8.25 
S.50 
9.20 
9.50 
10.50 
11.50 

p 12.50 
2.50 
3.20 
3.50 



AlO.20 
11.20 

p 12.20 



p 4.20 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 
6.30 
6.50 
8.00 
9.10 
10.20 



A 5.20 

6.00 

p 1.50 



p 1.20 
1.35 



From FERNSIDE— Sundaj-s excepted— 6.55, 8.00, 11.05 

A. M., and 6.05 p. u. 

♦Change Cars at " Broadway," Oakland. 

A— Morning, p— Afternoon. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, aud Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towxe, General Superintendent. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

KOETHEBN DIWSIOM 

Commencing X«v. 6th, 1876, Passenger 
Trains will leave San Francisco from Passenger De- 
pot on Townsend street as follows : 

8 0Ai.n (daily) for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Trea 
.0\J Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all Way 
Stations. fe^At Pajaro connects with the Santa 
Cruz Railroad for Aptos and SANTA Cruz. At Salinas 
connects with the M. & S. V. R. R. for Monterey. Stage 
counectionsinade with this train. 



nO C A M. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Sta- 
•*"J tiou s. 

3 0£Tp.M. daily (Sundays excepted) for San Jose, 
.UO Gilroy and Way Stations. 



A AC\ p.m. (daily) for San Jose and Way Stations. 



(> 0(\ p.m. (daily) for San Mateo and Way Stations. 

SOrTHRR.V DIVISION. 

fSg~ Passengers for points on the Southern Division 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton and Indian Wells. 
A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 
J. L. Willcutt, GenT Passenger and Ticket Agent. 
(November 18.] 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S SIEEL PENS. 

Sold by all Stationers throughout the 
World. Sole Agent for the United States : MR 
HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 16. 



H. H. MOOBE. 

Dealerin Books for Libraries. --A large 
assortment of fine and rare books just received, 
and for sale at 609 Montgomery street, near Merchant, 
San Francisco Oct. 24. 



Feb. IT, 1-77. 



NOTABILIA. 



v \l LFORNIA AD\ EUTISER, 

MEDICAL DIRECTORY. 



11 



What n crowd and crush! Ricb Mid j*..t. Thtt Ql-clftd and the 

■ 
.: ig in count!) i nd exits 

>\ lik-- 'int.- it. W ■■ itop ii.. 1 ii ■ 

itreet, 
at tic- -lr\ .. i« of J. .1. if fn i. -n __. Co. 'I'll" b. ,uit\ -. ' 'V ■ 1 

■i their yoods have nttracted! buyers from all parte 
.if til-- city, Ncvi r did '.!.•* deposit i - _u .. broken l-.wik appear moi 

<t their money out, than ■!•> O'Brien'i c__tom_ri appear to put 
theirs into » good investment of bis stock. 



The water bug, <>f which then in millions in tin- Sprint Vallt 

tion of the hour. The inexpressibly nasty creatures 
■tick in the thmat and cftUM diphtheria, and Fasten and ratten upon the 
rt oma c h, and »■ produce lockjaw, and thus, in a measure, destroy the 
i'.. prevent these aire calamities, tin.- Carbon 
I i thin);. 1' i* t'i be procured ol Bush _ Milne, under 

i mery street There is quite a rush for 

tli. -. filters j nst now. Pui old do well t.' hurry up before they 

an all gone. 

" Is my breakfast ready ? " said an impatienl young man who was 
trying to gel hie morning meal at a restaurant. "Don't know/' 

. " I'll whistle up and -■•■•." " Heavens, no! don't do that : I or- 
dered sausage, and if you whistle you'll have the whole pack down!*' 
w ! '. sow we happen t*> know tin- neatest, cleanest, and best place in the 
city, where you nave neither to whistle nor wait. Swain's Bakery, on 
Sutter, above Kearny, is the right place t-> ^<> to for a clean, cheap, and 
square meat 

A Chicago girl, while crossing Lake Superior, lost one of her shoes 
overboard, and now captains "f vessels arriving ;>t Duluth, ure telling 

i of a nivsU-rious marine monster which they sighted during 
their trips. 

A servant who plumed himself upon living in a genteel family, was 

nsk.-.l tli-' definition of the term, "where they have two or three kinds 

»'f win.-, and the gentlemen Bwear," was the reply. That family became 

: by buying only Gerke wine of I. Landsberger, of 10 and 12 

Uley. The gentleman gave up swearing, and subscribed for the 

An Oregon boy, who got to school the other day before the master 
and lii- fi Uows, declared a vacancy, and east tlie whole vote of the school 
in Eavorof ;i bonday. Watt's his namel The teacher declared it a Crowin 
infamy. The whole crowd have been photographed by Bradley & 
Rulofson, and may be found among the celebrities at their world re- 
nowned art gallery on Montgomery street. 

It is foolishness for a man to try to make game of a boarding house 
iking at it under the impression that a steady gaze of the hu- 
man eye will make auy animal quau. But a Union Range, bought of 
Mr. de la afontanya, on Jackson st., below Battery, will cook to a turn 
fish, flesh, fowl, .nut even good red herrings. For economy, and the per- 
il of its results, it has no rival. 



Anything But -A man was killed recently at one of our theaters 
"by a weight which fell from the flies." What falls from the flies is thus 
evidently not always a flyblow. 

Dr. E. de F. Curtis, M. D., etc. , may be consulted at his office and 
residence, 520 Sutter street, between Powell and Mason streets, daily, 
from 1" \- '■' toSP. H. f and from 6 to 8 P. M.; on Sundays from llto2 
only. I'r. Curtis is licensed to practice medicine under the new Medi- 
cal Art; his publications can be obtained from A. L. Bancroft & Co., 
.■lit- tor the Pacific coast, or from the author, Dr. Curtis, 520 
Sutter street, S. F. _ 

A thin person may succeed as a lecturer, but when a fat man sits 
down he always makes'a deeper impression. Particularly is this the case 
if the chair or lounge baa been selected from the softest and best, to be 
obtained at the great furniture warehouse of N. P. Cole & Co., of 2_0 to 

226 I'.ush street. 

A youngster said to his mother, " I should think if T was made of 
dust, I would get muddy inside when I drink coffee/' That boy's head 

> ! vcl. People get muddy on the inside of the upper story by the poor 
stuff they drink. That is why clear headed men buy good " Old Cutter 
Whisky " from A. P. Hotaling, 429 and 431 Jackson street. 

The young man who wrote and asked his girl to accept a " bucket" 
of flowers became a little pale when she said she wooden ware it. 

Music — divine music— is the harmony of the angels. Heaven is one 
vast opera company. There is but one instrument on earth that we know 
of which is fit to join in the heavenly chorusses, and that is the piano of 
Hallet, Davis & Co. Badger is the agent, at 13 Sansome street. 

It is a curious fact, but no less curious than true, that of the hun- 
dreds who have died of small pox and diphtheria, not one drank Napa 
Soda. It follows that as all who drink it survive epidemics, it is the 
most healthful of all popular drinks. 

What a silent old world this would be if men talked only as much 
as they think. A fellow would have to carry a rattle around with him to 
make a noise with. But a man may both think .wisely and talk well, if 
he will but take in moderation a little of heaven's inspirer. Go and talk 
to F. & P. J- Cassin, 523 Front Street, about their best liquors, and they 
will tell you all abou t it. 

Near sight, farsight, clear sight, and double sight, are all adjusted 
to an exactly normal condition by Muller, with -the aid of his unrivaled 
spectacles. 



DR. HUNTER'S PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS. 
riioronfo School «>t ■exUedne, Toronto, July lllli. Ihuh.... 
1 I . . rtitj I 

the Hsdlcsl Board for Upper a ■ II. H. WHlutil M.D., 

■ 
Di liiinu-r'n Office l» m S18 Butter rtn 1 1 

TEETH SAVED! 

Filling: Teefh a N|M<h.l. >.---*. rv.it patlOBlOfJ euleiided to 
Chloroform edmlnl Alter ten 

instant pmctloo, I oui guarantee ntlsfacttou. I 

. .bovo llontgomi (June O.J DR. UORFFKW, Dentist 



M- 
author ol 
miii, . Bouts, i 



DR. J. H. STAL1ARD, 
ember or the Royal Collece of Physicians, Lomion. «ic.. 

Female Qygloou the Pacific Coast 11 B.B. Post and Kearny. 

1 and 7 to _ r. M. Februarj 

ARTIFICIAL TrETH. 

Bountiful celluloid plates uftAde by l>r. Jessup, corner 
Butter and Monl ts, al |20 ;i sot, are tar superior i»> rules 

her, mill tin ■ ■■'■ r i.| di-.' natural gum. 

niVSKIAN, 81ROEON AND ACCOI CHE I It, 

J. J. AUERBACH. M.D., 
March 13. UOJ Btoekton street, San Francisco. 

STEELE'S SQUIRREL POISON. 
[Patented October ISM, 1876.] 

For sale by nil 

Price, 81 per box. Made by JAMES 
<j. STEELE ..v CO., Sao Francisco, Cat. Liberal discount to the Trade. Aug. 21. 



Sure death to Squirrels, Bats, Gophers, etc. 
Druggists, Grocers and General Dealers. " 



E 



0. P. 



WARREN, M.D. 
clcctlc Physician, corner of Fourteenth and Broadway, 

t ukkmd. - June 17. 

N. MILLER, M.D, 
)hyslclan, Oakland. Office, lOO-l Broadway ; 

Eighth street. 



Residence, 36-1 

October 2. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



D. F. Hl'TCHINQS. 



J. Sanderson. 



D. M. Dunne. 
PHOZNIX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1S50.— Hatchings a Co., OH and CommlsNfon 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO. 
olesale Auction Honse, 204 ami 206 California street. 

Sale days, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10 a m. Cash advances on consign. 

Dec. 14. 



w 



CHARLES LE UAY, 
American Commlssiu.i merchant. - - 1 Kne Scribe, Paris. 

WHOLESALE CROCERS. 



Newton Booth, C. T. Wheeler, Sacramento. ] J. T. Glover, W. W. Dodoe, S. F 
W. W. DODGE & CO., 

Wholesale Grocers, comer Front and Clny streets, San 
Francisco. April 1. 

REMOVAL. 

L. H. Nbwtos.1 NEWTON BFOTHERS & CO., [Morris Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, have removed to 204 and 206 California street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. June 7. 

TABER, HAREER & CO., 

Successors to Phillips, Tabcr A' Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, 103 and 110 California street, below Front, San Francisco. April 15. 

A. S. R0SENBAUM ft CO., 

Southeast corner of California and Battery streets, invite 
the attention of their cusLoint_rs and others to their large assortment of the 
Best and Finest Brands of CHEWING and SMOKING TOBACCO, HAVANA CIGARS 
and C1GAK1TOS. Consignments of Choicest Brands of Cigars received bv every 
Steamer. [Oct. 18 ] A. S. ItOSENBAUM k CO. 

\ £&' PRINTS TES 

JESJtlTJOE, -637 SACKAEtENTO STREET, 

J BELOW JIUNTGOMERY. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, dally, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

San Fr_u.c1-.co. [May 24. 

CASTLE BROTHERS.— [Established, 1850.] 

Importers of Teas and East India Ooods, Nos.213 and 219 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

PERSONS VJSITING THE EAST 

Will find full files of Pacific Coast papers and conve- 
niences for letter writing, etc., at Wells, Fargo __ Co.'s Office, fiS Broadway, 
New York. March 25. 

P. H. CANAVAN, 
Real Estate, 521 Montgomery Street. S. F. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER AND 



Feb. 17, 1877. 



ART JOTTINGS. 

The increased attendance at the exhibition of the Art Association 
gives evidence of the wisdom of the removal from the old quarters farther 
down the street ; the pictures now on view, howevei*, have been more 
generally noticed by the press than those of any preceding collection, and 
it is to be hoped that at each succeeding exhibition the quality of the 
pictures admitted will steadily improve until the gallery will cease to be, 
as it is now, free to all comers, regardless of quality. The hanging of poor 
pictures sent in by obscure artists, or amateurs, is not the only evil result- 
ing from this leniency ; it encourages artists of note to impose upon the 
Association by sending inferior and carelessly treated pictures, and 
demanding for them choice positions to the exclusion of more meritorious 
works by other artists. It is folly to say that all offerings must be 
accepted in order to fill up and make a big show. All must admit that if 
one-half the pictures by local artists had been excluded, together with 
one-third the foreign contributions, the present exhibition would have 
been greatly improved ; it is with good pictures as with good people, 
being seen in bad company is detrimental to both. 

We come next to No. 47, " Coming from the Shrine," by Virgil Wil- 
liams, a picture by no means a fair example of this class of subjects so 
generally treated by Mr. Williams ; although better than "The Morning 
Call," referred to last week, in that it has no particular defects, unless the 
tad-polish contour of the little girl's head would be considered one. The 
picture, however, is weak and uncertain in color, and utterly void of any 
of the qualities which comprise a good picture. Thomas Hill is repre- 
sented by two large pictures, but one of which, No. 50, "Rescue of the 
Innocents," is new to the public. It is sume months since Mr. Hill 
returned from the Centennial, where he was awarded high honors for 
pictures there exhibited, and during this time it has been thought by his 
many friends that he must be engaged upon some important work, which 
he purposed placing in the gallery of the Association of which he is a 
time-honored friend. In No. 50. however, we have a picture which, 
despite its large size, does not indicate that any great amount of labor, 
skill or care was expended in its production — a picture which evidently 
none but critics, who have advanced to the Corot standard of art lore, can 
possibly appreciate or successfully defend. The picture is doubtless 
intended to portray a scene more or less tragic in character, although the 
title applies to burlesque quite as well, and whether it does not come 
nearer the latter than the former is something of an open question. A 
bald eagle has attacked a flock of sheep, and selected for his victim a 
young and very dead lamb. The shepherd's dog comes to the rescue, and 
this, with the supposed fright of the flock, forms the subject. The small 
size of the bird would indicate that it was a young eagle, were it not for 
the white head, neck and tail, which are only found upon this species after 
they are thxie years old. It is drawn tolerably true to nature, except the 
head, which shows an ignorance of ornithology surprising in an artist who 
has before painted the " bird emblematic." All birds of prey have a most 
important and distinguishing feature in the formation of the beak 
called the cere, and consists of a dense membrane saddled on the upper 
mandible at the base and extending over a good portion of its length — say 
a third—and out of this open the nostrils. The most careful observer 
will fail to find either of these prominent features. The upper 
mandible is hooked, as it should be, but the lower one is of a shape 
entirely different from that of an eagle, which is quite blunt at 
the apex, enabling it to fit into and against the hooked shape 
of th e upper one, in stead of sharp as is this. The lower bill 
should be heavy and thick and strong, not slender and sharp, as would be 
a wood-pecker's. The mouth of the bird is open, showing plainly the tongue; 
and here, again, Mr. Hill displays his carelessness or ignorance, for he repre- 
sents it as being smooth, whereas an eagle's tongue is bifid, and has a barb 
about half way between the point and the throat, and when enraged the 
mouth is usually open and this barb quite prominent. We are to sup- 
pose that the eagle has just struck the lamb, from the fact that a com- 
panion is staring at the scene, while the ewe mother comes dashing 
up to protect her young. That little lamb was struck very dead, indeed; 
not a struggle is visible, nor the indication of one, to say nothing of the 
wooden appearance of it, as well as of the one looking on. -Again, the 
ewe must be as tame as " Mary's little lamb," and inured to dangers un- 
usual, that would, thus face death, and, as it were, fight for her young. 
Mr. Hill represents the flock of sheep running from the right to the 
left in full view of the scene. This is quite improbable, though possible, 
for sheep will blindly follow a leader even into danger; but most of the 
sheep have their mouths open in full bleat. This is quite unnatural, for 
when running from danger they are always silent. The dog is represented 
as nosing about the scruff of the neck of the eagle as if in play. This idea 
is strengthened, too, by his position; he is setting backward, just as a dog 
will when in play, or catching food thrown him. Of course his face is 
buried in the bird's feathers, so that we are in the dark as to his expres- 
sion. Mr. Hill has not even given us a sight of one of his eyes, though 
the place where the eye ought to be is in plain view. This pacific ap- 
pearance is still further confirmed by the mild mannered actions of the 
eagle; his look is tame and kindly, and that angry eye is nearly expres- 
sionless. Who can doubt that, in a real scene, such as is sought to be 
shown, those talons would, in an instant, be buried in the breast of the 
dog ? The landscape in the picture— the hills, sky and vegetation— are all 
that could be looked for, even from Mr. Hill. Of course these latter are 
made accessories, but still they are beautifully rendered, and it is a pity 
that such masterly painting should be marred in the manner we have set 
forth. Even the shepherd is painted in the most conventional manner, 
holding a long stick in the middle and both arms uplifted to the full 
length, just as we have been used to seeing women represented as running 
after, tumbled over or otherwise embarrassed offspring. Of all the sheep in 
the picture, but one gives evidence of any motion, and that is the ewe 
coming to the rescue, and even the natural appearance of this one is sadly 
spoiled by the impossible position of the right hind leg. _ Some of the 
sheep in the middle distance have the hind legs stuck as straight, even and 
stiff as any toy lamb. The Jottings, some years ago took occasion to 
sharply criticise a certain composite bird of Hill's, wherein he gave us a 
fairly good eagle's head, with an equally truthful buzzard's foot, and simi- 
larly to the first one, this is not even an " Eagle bird by chance." He 
seems to have taken our criticism in good part, and has now given us an 
elegant pair of talons, but has clearly lost his grip on the head. The plot 
is too thin to capture our halting faith. " Innocence " is dead — we have 
no need of the "Rescue." Let us not be understood as dispairing of this 
artist's achieving an eagle yet — in fact we have set our heart upon it — and 



shall not abandon the hope, on the principle of " three times, and out" — 
unless he make another failure. And now we will call attention to a really 
superb work by Mr. Hill. It can be seen in the gallery, No. 20 Post 
street. It is a full length portrait of the artist's little son with his favorite 
dog. We say it is a portrait, yet so deftly is it handled that one looks at 
it with no feeling that it is one— nothing of the realism generally found in 
portraiture. The likeness is no doubt good, albeit it is a fine face, full of 
expression, and the entire figure is most natural and boy-like. The dog, 
too, is life-like and natural, as he lovingly gazes into the face of his mas- 
ter. The massing of wild flowers in and about the picture takes from it, 
most effectually, any idea of realism it might otherwise possess. All the 
accessory painting is done with a freedom of touch and delicacy of color 
such as is seldom seen except in works put out by the best French mas- 
ters. Art Association catalogue resumed next week. 



SEWERAGE, SMALL-POX AND DIPHTHERIA. 
Poisonous sewerage and disease may not be convertible terms, but 
they have a close alliance one with the other. Our wretched sewers, all 
choked and alarmingly poisoned as they are, serve as the cause, of which 
disease, in epidemic forms, is the effect. The present death rate of our 
city is terribly high, but who shall say that it will not soon be higher? If 
the winter passes away, as it seems as if it will, without thoroughly clean- 
ing out the sewers, then who shall tell what the next summer may bring 
forth ? The exciting cause of small-pox, diphtheria and malarial fevers 
will remain festering under our feet, and as positively as day follows the 
night, as certainly as effect is traceable to cause, and as surely as miasma 
poisons and kills, so surely will our long pent up disease-laden sewerage 
produce a terrible epidemic, whose dimensions may well alarm the world. 
The case of Buenos Ayers cannot be too often mentioned, or too vividly 
described. A great city, with a climate almost amounting to perfection, was 
decimated by fever resulting from neglected sewerage. Business was 
brought to a stand still, thousands fled the city and tens of thousands died 
premature deaths, so that there was hardly left sufficient well people to 
bury the dead. Horror and sorrow took hold of ev^ry household. The 
city lost its fair fame for "pure air" and healthfulness, and is shunned to 
this day. We have all the exciting causes of just suck an epidemic pres- 
ent in our midst. Already, too, we have signs of its possible approach. 
Diphtheria, small-pox and fever having made their appearance, are daily 
increasing the number of their victims. All this should stir our citizens 
to action. Yet no adequate effort is being suggested, much less put forth. 
Nero fiddled|whilst Rome was burning, and the people of San Francisco 
remain with folded arms whilst the grim visage of death stares them in 
the face. That seething mass of corruption which remains in all the sew- 
ers between Montgomery street and the water front must be speedily sent 
on a voyage through the Golden G-ate out into the waters of the broad 
Pacific ocean, or else a terrible scourge must inevitably ensue. City 
Fathers, members of the Board of Health, Grand Jurors, members of the 
Mechanics' Institute, Chamber of Commerce, and of Mutual Aid Socie- 
ties, and every citizen who has a life that he values, should be up and 
doing. A remedy for the threatened evil ought to be, can be, discovered. 
An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure. 



THE EVENING EMETIC. 
That diseased, old, Czapskay-doctored organ, the Bulletin, vomits 
forth half a column of hog-wash in its last issue, purulent with" bilious 
spite, against the News Letter, and reeking with the fetid slime of its 
head worm, Fitch. The Bulletin is indeed a very worm, a peculiar 
worm, which, when the head is lopped off, gathers and exudes filth from 
the mutilated and wriggling body that is left. It is a noisome, foul 
weed, such as grows in a green, dank pond, and poisons the birds and 
animals that venture to bask in it. The Bulletins friendship is a dark, 
rotten death; its enmity, a healthy stimulant. In its venomous spleen it 
mercilessly spits a poor, silly correspondent of a New York paper, who 
has maligned San Francisco society, as an excuse for wrapping its beastly, 
clammy coils around all who are opposed to its daily putrescent issue of 
sewerage. It, the foulest and most damnably-convicted blackmailer 
known to the community, attacks the Chronicle on the water question, 
ourselves on general principles, and couples both with a low sheet that 
shall be nameless. With the pitiable sneer of a whelping poltroon it 
hints at several "gross libelers," who either are or will soon be lying in 
jail. If ever Satan tried to rebuke sin (which we doubt) he erred, but a 
still greater insult to vice is for the sloughing sore known as the Bulletin 
to express its approval of it. To be condemned by this hideous journal- 
istic ulcer is to have surely done well, and so, in common with all good 
men, whom it has killed or tried to kill, from James King of William, 
Adams & Co., Palmer, Cook & Co., and Sullivan, up to the late Wm. 
Ralston, we can say: " Thank God! for the hate of that leprous sheet, 
the San Francisco Bulletin.'" It has, however, not yet killed us, and is 
at present not likely to do so. If the Chronicle feels alarmed it has a cu- 
rious way of showing it. At latest dates the Bulletin resembled a foul 
tarantula, whose dirty blue and green blood was being slowly squeezed 
out of it by the relentless heel of its morning contemporary. 

DIVIDEND NO TICES, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Home Mutual Insurance Company. — Tbis Company will 
pay a dividend of 1 per cent, upon the capital stock on and after February 
10, 1877. CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary, 

February 10. 406 California street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank, No. 6 Post Street, 
ftlasome Temple, San Francisco. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of 
this Batik, held January 18th, 1877, a Dividend was declared at the rate of Nine (9) 
per cent, per annum on Term Deposits and Seven and One-Half (7A) per cent, per an- 
num on Ordinary Deposits, for the Semi-Annual Term ending January 2lst, 1S77, 
payable on and after January 25th, 1877, free of Federal Taxes. 
Jan. 27. H. T. CRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French Mutual Provident Saving's and Loan Society. .--A 
Dividend of nine (9) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Taxes, for the six 
months ending December 31_1S7(>, was declared at the Annual Meeting held on Jan- 
uary 15, 1877, payable on and after January 17, 1877. Bv order. 
Jan. 20. GUSTAVE MAHE, Director. 



l-VW, 17. is?;. 



i \l [FORNIA Al>\ ERT1SER, 






NED ADAMS AND NED SOTHERN. 
The chief event of the week in tl world, and ; 

>i the 

to tin* 
■ 
liinii tribute reudervd by Mr. A friends .ml 

uitlluUt I'.inlUl Hi tin- ttlHI il. all. I 

|ii!ttn»ti'>n "f the wiinniit'jtrt. <i friendship and brotherhood 
which riutn nui no)} don, but also, 

■t" tip- tmrtltii " "t uur A uly life, auu>iup*t the public of San Fran- 

that evening i- noticed elsewhere in oar column**, and we 

.•nIv revert to it t-> lympathy with the gnat actor, and to 

kindly action "i one of Mr. A. lam--' oldest and best friends "ii 

■ 

M : Sot) i, .mil " N< .1" Adams have been acquaintances and " chums" 

any lime for the paat twenty years, and ento rtsun for each other that ten- 

rr^rd and affection which is hardly to I"- found except 

uch men s friend is 
ban a brother, and Damon thinks no ■aerifies i> too great, no self • 
i. for him '..■ cheerfully submit to, it Pythias can 
rvod or beneBted. It i- weU known that Mr. Sothern 
i in San Francisco after the oonclusioDof his engagement at the 
Calif ornia Theater, for the purpose of adding t" the attraction of Mou- 
oinir'a performance, and thai 1" For $500 to the box 

the pro ■■ of a seat in the house. This is only the generous con- 
duct that might have been expected "f the man by all who know his 
worth. 

It may not be so generally known that Mr. Sothern stul remains in 
San Krai rams of money that will be the 
(.•iialiy »>f bis failing to keep his en in other cities, for the sole 
tending what may. we fear, only too probably 
oe the hw»t moments of his beloved friend. Bines Monday, Mr. Adams, 
whoattir>t seemed to have been affected for good by the excitement of 
the evening, baa gradually declined He has not tasted food for four 
days : and bis bile, so dear to all who ever knew the good, brave fellow, 
conch his devoted wife and his beloved 
d i Sothern keep watch, tearfully striving to make smooth the i»ntli 
i.. the gateway of that other bright and happy life which must surely 
await one who has lived here bo guilelessly as Ned Adams. Mr. Sothern s 
solicitude for his friend, exercised as it is at a sacrifice which few 
men in these selfish days would feel called upon to make, needs no com- 
ment. 

DRAGONS IN THE WATER ! 
Many years ago Professor Pepper, the English .scientist, used to give 
lectures at the Polytechnic Institute in London. One of his favorite 
pastimes consisted in mafnufying filtered water forty million times, and 
reflecting it on a huge sheet in the lecture room. The result showed six- 
foot drains cavorting arouud with enormous zoophytes ami huge eels, 
while mammoth snails and gigantic worms rolled over and over in ceaseless 
and unending jollity. A precisely similar excitement is now being gotten 
it the Spring Valley water. Nobody pretends that the water 
which flows through, the mains of any gTeat city is perfectly pure. House- 
- mould have filters in .San Francisco just as people do elsewhere. 
Ths whole excitement is a tempest in a tea-pot Every child knows that 
animal life exists in ordinary water, and it the idea is unpleasant the 
. is at band for a small outlay. Our California boys and yirls have 
do peers in Bize and health, and the "red bugs," '* cyclops," and other 
denizens of our faucets do uot seem visibly to affect them. But times are 
dull, and even the election question is Btagnant, so a little hullaballoo 
about the impurity of our water comes a la bonru funrc to the thought- 
racked and brain-drained journalist. If the Spring Valley Water Works 
pretend to supply each house in this city with charcoal and carbon filtered 
water, then abuse them. As long as they give just as pure water as auy 
other water company in the world there can he no pretence for the flimsy 

agitation of the question, except the omnipotent argument of dollars and 
cents. Ine iVeies Letter** wood engraver is busily engaged on a cut of a 

beast found alive only in very old and pure brandy. It has a very jovial 
appearance, nothing herbaceous or crustaceous about it, is fitted with an 
armor plated back and a corkscrew head which will work its way through 
any bottle. Airain, Madeira, forty years old. contains insects which, we 
are told, can be resuscitated after their long " drunk " the moment air is 
admitted to the wine. The last Lord Mayor's dinner exhibited some 
animalculce in the civic water decanters which were freely commented 
on. It was found that they were the result of excessive rain and a turbid 
condition of the New River. The Soring Valley mains have also been af- 
fi cted temporarily and slightly by tue late rains; but no apology is needed 
in the premises, as the troul.de sought to be created is not even an eight- 
day sensation. The cyclops in the water is, indeed, a pig in a poke. 



HI0HK3T STOCK QUOTATIONS FOB WEEK ENDING *Efi. 16, 1S77. 



Sauk or Ulna 



During the past few weeks the ZVews Letter office has been inun- 
dated with letters from females of every age and creed, asking for some 
information as to the condition of tiie Baby market! Indisputable as our 
quotations are on the stock and other markets, we have as yet been unable 
to furnish the required information, and in fact have been considerably in 
the dark as to the exact purport and cause of the inquiries. At the 
eleventh hour one lady, more explicit than her neighbors, has succeeded 
in throwing some little light on the subject. She mentions that of late an 
advertisement has frequently caught her eye of " 'Helen's Babies sold 
here ! * I write to know particulars as to age, color, etc., and whether 
Helen's productions claim any advantage over those of any other brand." 
She also finds fault with the low figure at which these little treasures are 
quoted — "one dollar, in cloth"— and seems greatly agitated over the 
question as to whether the cloth iB only shoddy, or a really serviceable 
material for the infant's necessary continuations ! To these inquiring 
matrons we can only reply that not being well up in the subject, we are 
loth to pass an opinion, but that we firmly believe that Helen's brand is 
as good as they make them, and the cloth not to be sneezed at. In fact, 
for nursery furniture, the infants in question will prove a decided success, 
at least in the matter of keeping tolerably quiet ! 

Come Veal, Come Veau. - A town pastor preaching in the country 
recently, referred to the "fatted calf " as one that had been loved by 
the prodigal's family for many years. When a clergyman re-veals sucn 
gnorance as this the School Board should look calfter him. 



Alpha 

alia ... 
Atlantic Don — 

Alp* 

■ ■ 

AJnuM 





Belehai , 

l on. 

■Bullion 

Baltic 

Boston 

Belmont 

Benton 

'Crown Point ■ . . 

Ohollar 

Con \ irginla. . , . 

California 

Call donia 

Cosmopolitan- . . 
i ions Imperial . . . 

■ 'i 

Confidence 

Con Con 
Challenge 



Dardanelles. . . . 
[£urekaCon 

. 1ST 

Globe 

i.; t mid .v Curry . 
Great Eastern . .. 

Gila 

Golden Chariot . . 

liciicml Th as. 

Grand Prise 

Gold Run 

'Hale A Korcroas 

Hussej 

Julia 

Justice 

Jackson 

Jenny Glynn 

n 

Kossuth 

Kentuck 

Knickerbocker . ■ 

K. K. Cons 

Lady Bryan 

Leopard 

Lady Wash'u .: .. 

Leviathan 

Loyal 

Leeds 

Mexican 

Monumental .... 

■Mint 

Mansfield 

Modoc 

Manhattan 

Meteor 

Meadow Valley . . 

Melones 

Martha & Bessie. 

New COSO 

Northern Belle . . 
N. Con. Virginia. 
Nevada 

" New York 

Niagara *.. 

N. Monumental.. 

X. LUfht 

Ophir 

Overman 

Occidental 

Og. Comstock. .. 

Oregon 

Prospect — .... 

Poorman 

Phil Sheridan . . . 

Panther 

Raymond &. Ely. 

Rising star 

Rock island 

Bough and Readv 
live Patch 

"Savage 

Sierra Nevada . 

Silver Hill 

Superior 

Shasta 

Southern Star. 

Succor 

Seg Belcher .. . 
South Chariot . 
S. V. Water... 

S. Modoc 

Trojan 

Trenton 

Twin Peaks - ,. 

Union Con 

Utah 

Union Flag 

Washoe , 

Woodville 

Wells Fargo. .. 

Ward 

WestCom stock 
Yellow Jacket . 



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Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 

There is at least one tlrug worse than libeling a rogue, and that is 
anting him to cover up his tracks anil get away quietly with his booty. 
Bulletin please copy. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Feb. 17, 1877. 



COURT CHAT, 

And the Upper Ten Thousand at Home and Abroad. 

The "Westminster Gazette" learns on good authority from Rome 
that the young Prince Louis Napoleon has been initiated by Prince 
Humbert into the mysteries of Italian Freemasonry. — 

The Pope is very dissatisfied with the conduct of the ex-Empress Eu- 

fle'ne and of her son. Pius IX. had advised the young Prince tr> quit 
taly as soon as possible. This judicious advice, however, has not been 
followed ; on the contrary, the Empress has been very assiduous in her 
visits to the Quirinal, and is in constant intercourse with those of the no- 
ble families in Rome who are partisans of King Victor Emanuel. For 
these reasons the Pope refused to dispense with his own hands the Holy 
Communion both to the Empress and the Prince. As the Empres Eu- 
genie's request was made to him thePopesaid, " Anche, l'altro presto la Santa 
Comunione, a Sant Anna dorata." By the "other " the Pope meant Na- 
poleon III. The Pope held up as an example to the Empress and the 
Prince the conduct of Don Carlos, who, on his recent visit to Rome sought 
the Apostolic blessing, and ■ n advice at once took his departure from 
Italy. The ex-Empress and ih: Prince Imperial on Jan. 9th attended 
a solemn mass at the San+a Cruce for the repose of the soul of the late 
Emperor. On New Year b Day the Prince sent a curious greeting to each 
Cardinal to whom he had been presented — a tine eel bearing in its mouth 
a visiting card. This was said to be a traditionary gift of the Bonapartes 
to the princes of the Church. 

A curious rumor is afloat, for which the Spectator does not vouch, 
that the Porte, in its eagerness for money, has offered to sell the Heredit- 
ary Pashalic of the Holy Land to any candidate accepted by the Jews, 
in return for a loan. The transaction would be one of the most singular 
in history, but is is not beyond the range of possibility. Palestine needs 
nothing hut irrigation and trees, and though the Jews dislike agricul- 
ture, fellaheen sufficient might be attracted from Egypt. The restoration 
of the Jews, with Lord Beaconsfield for first King, would be an incident 
romantic enough to satisfy even the imagination of the author of " Alroy." 
If the Jews refuse, the Turks should ask Brigham Young to make a bid. 
His agents were said, twelve months ago, to be sounding the Porte, and 
studying the capabilities of the country, and the Mormon leader would 
glide easily into the position of a Pacha. 

Wig Grace of Marlborough in his first public appearance as Viceroy 
of Ireland has been true to himself, as witness this extract from his ad- 
dress in reply to the congratulations of the Town Commissioners of Kings- 
town. "Landing (said his Grace) in this spacious harbor, which, fa- 
vored by natural advantages, is evidence of the highest enterprise and en- 
gineering skill which is a monument of the country, and tends so largely 
to its commercial prosperity, I am forcibly reminded of what Ireland is 
capable of becoming." If his Grace really did land in the harbor, he 
must have got very wet. Is Ireland defunct, that a harbor qr anything 
else can be called its monument? And how can a man, even a Viceroy, 
be "reminded" of what he himself declares to be in the future poten- 
tial ? 

The marriage of Lady Georgina Seymour, the last unmarried, but not 
the youngest nor the least charming, of the daughters of the Marquis of 
Hartford, with Captain Moray, was solemnized at St. Peter's, Eaton- 
square, on the 23d ult. It is the fashion nowadays to display the bridal 
presents, and her ladyship's were rich, and certainly not in one sense 
rare, for they might have filled a shop-front in Bond-street. Her Maj- 
esty's present had not arrived when I inspected them, but, said Jeames 
de la Plushe, 'We all know what it will be — an Indian shawl.' — The 
World. 

The first great ball was given at the Elysees lately. Great prepara- 
tions seem to have been made for it. It is said that 21,000 applications 
were made, and 5,000 invitations given. The ordinary drawing-rooms 
were increased by supplementary constructions. The buffet received pe- 
culiar attention, and champagne flowed amply. The Marshall and Ma- 
dame MacMahon had each to bow 4,000 or 5,000 times, from nine in the 
evening' till midnight. 

A grand mediaeval tournament, on the pattern of that at Egling- 
ton Castle, at which Prince Louis Napoleon, afterwards Emperor, Count 
cTOrsay, the wild Lord Waterford, and other preux chevaliers of that day 
took part, is to be held on the shaven sward of Hurlingham in the coming 
summer. It is expected that the Princess of Wales will consent to offi- 
ciate as Lady Paramount. — Yorick. 

The frontage of the 'leg of mutton' piece of land in Northumber- 
land-avenue, opposite Morley's Hotel, London, has at last been sold for 
a new hotel at the enormous ground-rent of £9,000 per annum. This will 
leave the back part of the ground^or other speculators, and a new theater 
and a new concert-hall are among the probabilities of the position. — The 
World. 

Violets have been so plentiful in France, owing to the mildness of the 
season, that on Jan. 15th, the anniversary of the late French Emperor's 
death, there appeared to be a gmwth of Imperialism. We are assured 
that no influence other than warm weather favored the floral exhibition, 
in which true Imperialists take delight. 

The brother and heir of the dethroned Taicoon of Japan is at this 
moment fixed in Paris as a student. He is a gentlemanly young man. 
The Mikado allows him £200 a year for his expenses. Iflii lapsus.' Ten 
years ago thirty millions of people trembled at his name I — The World. 

We hear from a private source that those about the person of that 
fine old soldier the Emperor of Germany are not a little concerned at the 
state of his health. His Imperial Majesty is suffering from dropsy in the 
feet 

It is announced that about 1,100 head of pheasants were killed du- 
ring the three days' stay of the Prince of Wales at Eastwell Park. One 
day the Prince in a hot corner shot twenty-seven birds in five minutes. 

The widow of the late Earl Howe, of England, jumped from a win- 
dow of her residence in London, recently, and was killed. The Countess 
was about fifty years of age. 



VERDICT ALWAYS FOR THE DAVIS' VERTICAL FEED SEWING 
MACHINE. 

The Centennial Oolil Meilal and Diploma, 1876 ; the Scott 
Medal, 1875 ; the Franklin Institute Medal, 1S74. The Report of the Centennial 
Commission sa.vs : "The DAVIS is awarded the Grand Gold Medal of Honor and 
Diploma of Merit for excellent material and construction, adapted to the greatest 
range of work." We claim sales unprecedented, and satisfaction universal. In its 
construction it differs from all others, and is equaled by none. As an earnest of what 
is here claimed, the Manufacturers challenge all others for a friendly contest, either 
for amusement or a more substantial consideration. The Family Machine is Hjrht 
running and easily comprehended ; has an ingenious device "to take up" lost motion 
or wear, which, to a machinist, is positive proof of durability. We are pleased to 
refer to machines in manufacturing establishments here, where they have been in 
constant use for nearly three years, to verify the above. Has received more medals 
and complimentary testimonials than any other in the same length of time. Manu- 
facturers are especially invited to examine our No. 1, just out. Agents wanted in 
all unoccupied territory. MARK SHELDON, Gen'l Agent for the Pacific Coast, 

Dec. 23. No. 130 Post street. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, 

Importer. Dealer ami Manufacturer of Wire Goods, Wire 
Rope, Wire Screens, Iron and Brass Battery Cloth, etc. Wire Screens for win- 
dows and doors, and all kinds of Wire Work on hand and made to order. Sole Agent 
for Torrey's Weather Strips, to exclude dust and rain, and Hoi loway's Fire Extin- 
guisher. Proprietor of the Patent Endless Ropeway. Experienced workmen always 
on hand to fit up orders. California Wire Works : b : CALIFORNIA ST. Dec. 23. 

F. 0. Snow.] SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. [W. B. May. 

SNOW A MAT. 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pictures, Frames, Holding's, and Artists' Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



OPENING OF RaRE AND ELEGANT BOOKS! 

HH. Moore takes pleasure in announcing* that having 1 re- 
» turned from his annual purchasing trip to the great Eastern and European 
Literary Depositories, that he has received and now has open the largest assortment 
of ANTIQUE and MODERN LITERATURE ever before brought to this city, con- 
sisting of many old and rare books, and other novelties in literature. No one can 
fail to find the most acceptable HOLIDAY PRESENT for either old or young, male or 
female, amongst our varied stock. Gift Books in Great Variety. Call and examine 
our stock. [Dec. 10.] H. H. MOORE, 009 Montgomery street. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 

The attention of Sportsmen is invited to the following 
Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps; Chemically- pre pared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
all gun-makers and dealers in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Dec. 30. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 

AN EXTRAORDINARY RAZOR 

Has been invented by the Queen's Own Company of En- 
gland, the edge and body of which is so thin and flexible as never to require 
grinding, and hardly ever setting. It glides over the face like a piece of velvet, 
making shaving quite a luxury. It is creatiug a great excitement in Europe among 
the experts, who pronounce it PERFECTION. $2 for buffalo handles, $3 for ivory ; 
by mail, 10 cents extra. The trade supplied on liberal terms bv the sole agents in the 
United States. NATHAN JOSEPH & CO., 

September 2. No. 641 Clay street, S. F. 

LEA AND PERRINS' SAUCE. 

In consequence of spnrions imitations of WORCESTER- 
SHIRE SAUCE, which are calculated to deceive the public, Eli A AND 
P£UKI.\S have adopted A NEW LABEL BEARING THEIR SIGNATURE, 
LEA & PERRINS, which is placed on every bottle of WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, 
and without which none is genuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwefi, 
London, etc., etc., and bv grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 



Dee. 



MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 



CAUTION— BETTS'S PATENT CAPSULES. 

The public ;nTir»|i*'((i'i:lS," <■:; utioi *'<! that B^Um'm Patent Capsules 
are being Infringed. BETTS'S name is upon every Capsule he makes lor the 

hauling Merchants at home r.nd abroad, and he is (he Onlv Inventor and Sole Maker 
In the United Kingdom. Manufactory: 1. Wharf Road, City Road, London, 

Axr> BoRTiKAUx. France. .Tune lh. 

CONSUMPTION, INDCGE3TI0N AND WASTING DISEASES. 

The most efficacious remeflies are Pancreatic Emulsion and 
Pancreatine. The original and genuine prepared only by SAVORY & MOURE, 
143 New Bond-street, London. Sold by them and all Chemists and Storekeepers 
throughout Canada and the United States. Dec. 30. 

FOR SALE. 
c .^A ftffefk First Mortgage Bonds of the Nevada County 
^P?_#" "a""^."" " Narrow Gauge Railroad, running between Colfax, Grass 
Valley, and Nevada City. These bonds run 20 years, from January 1, 1876, bearing 
interest at the rate of 8 per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually at the bank of 
Wells, Fargo &. Co., in this city. No more desirable investment can be offered. Will 
be sold in lots to suit. [Sept. 9.] ANDREW BAIRD, No. 304 California street. 

BLANK BOOKS 

Sold from stock or manufactured to order from the Care w 
Extra Fine Ledger Paper, by JOHN G. HODGE & CO., Importers, Manufac- 
turers and Wholesale Stationers, 327, 329 and 331 Sansome street, S. F. Nov. 11. 

WILLIAM HARNEY, 
"VTotary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, northwest cor- 

J3I ner of Montgomery and Sacramento streets, San Franciscj, office of Madison 
& Burke. Aprii 20. 

EPPINGER'S SALOON. 

Louis Enplnger, formerly of Hal leek street, has removed 
to Nevada Block (entrance on Summer street). Will be happy to see all hie 
friends. MILWAUKEE BEER a Specialty. Sept 30. 



B. F Flint, Flint, Bixbt & Co.] [ J. Lee. D. W. Folger 

A. P. FLINT & CO., 

Graders, Packers and Dealers in Wool, corner of Battery 
and Greenwich streets, San Francisco. Jan. 29. 

CL X TCfii^^ a Week to Agents. §10 Outfit Free. 

mPw/HwI # February 10. P. O. VICKERY, Auynsta, Maine. 



!•>».. IT. 1877. 



CA1 [F0RN1 \ ADVEKTISEK. 



15 



SPECIAL BREVITIES. 



The bod* 



l in a im>t*llic 
WW in 
from the coffin 

;.U.-II .if th.' fOlploj 

it linn. Winn tin- train >: 

I. On the :ini\iil of the body at I 

i that th- in. ui bad cirt:»i: nsneaf, and dTea 

ttb. Hi* hnmln were clinch* I, iii*< bitten, ami month full of 

led of asphyxia. Hmd the agant Inrinttd upon 

i when he brat heard the moans, be would have 

rtae atmospheric disturbance whiob i* deluging Wsftern Europe 
.- now Likely to be accompanied 03 move- 
-nu» in (he cruet of the earth it-It.- Fornaarlj rl Blount 

shown eigne of awakening from the repose which - 

ntion of LB74 Professor Palmiert, who reeidee at the 

. ■mi Vesuvius, now s the apparent approach 

rt. The instruments in the i tbservatory have shown signs *>f 

it.»tiMii, and the amoke ha* boon issuing in increased quantitii - The 

iver, more than usually pent up, and the outburst, if there is 

.-. will be correspondingly inl 

The Lombard Street Poteutate. —That was gaits n canard 1 abont 
m of Mr. Albert Grant. He has n>> intention of adopting 
rofession, and the light of his countenance will *till uradiate 
nbard si t the musty purlieu - Inn. Tin- ex- 

auati"ii of the ominous rumor referred t" in our Last is simple. Mr. 
r.mc anticipates promotion some day to the ranks of the "great unpaid,* 1 

med it advisable to qualify for the honor, rjeno 
tent appearance in the "legal quarter" which so mystified the quid- 

inci aIkiuc town. 

Six boys have undergone an extraordinary adventure. They had 
dden thi mselves, they said, in a covered goods truck in Plymout b Sta 
months 8th inst., and being afraid of discovering themselves, tfieyre- 
: traveling up and dow a the line until the 11th, when the truck was 
hunted at Cristol, and a porter found the boyafast asleep, nearly dead 
ith cold, and exhausted tor want of food, which they had aot tasted for 

nights. 
A startling disclosure has been made at the Burnley Board of Guard- 
u>. Iii a report presented by the medical officer of health it was stated 
hat a farmer who supplies titty families with milk has bad typhoid fever 
ii his house unknown to the sanitary authorities ; that no precaution had 
ten taken t-> prevent the spread <>f the disease; tliat tifty-five members 
f these families have been attacked with typhoid fever, and that one of 
hem lias died. 
A diver on the coast of Queensland was the means last year of recov- 
ringfrom a wreck which was haunted by sharks attracted by the corpses 
containing 69,000. The Colonial Admiralty Court awarded him 
boat £3,000 aa salvage, and the owners of the gold, an Australian bank, 
□pealed against this sum as excessive. The Judicial Committee have 
ismissed the appeal 

At Chatham Dockyard, a few days since, a party of convicts were 
t work when one, named Dickens, a desperate character, undergoing 
wenty years' penal servitude, made his escape. He attempted to swim 
■oss the river, when lie was seen, and hailed to comeback. He refused] 
ad the warders tired, wounding him in the ear. He then held up his 
and in token of surrender, and returned to shore. 

The short report by Mr. < lonsul rXnox upon the trade of Siam during 
ie year 1875, reproduced from the Blue-book just issued, gives 
discouraging view of the commercial prospects of that country. It 
ppears that trade is shackled by heavy imposts, there being "no busi- 
es of any sort in which a Siamese can engage which does not immediately 
ring him face to face with the tax-gatherer." 

A young mail, representing himself as "Lord Rossmore," whose 
-ats of social mystification have been those of a higher sort of Alfred 
ingle, has been arrested at Rome, and now awaits his trial, for obtain- 
tg a passport under an assumed name. He is believed to be identical 
ith the "Drummond Hay" who similarly hoaxed the best Florentine 
ociety into giving him the entree of its charmed circle. 
Mr. GlacUtoae. in reply to a memorial from a meeting of Spiritual- 
its, says he is precluded by a general ride from adding his signature, 
ut that he is as yet wholly ignorant of the grounds on which the Gov- 
rnment has decided that the country shall become the prosecutor of Dr. 
llade, and that the decision is to him a surprising one, though he reserves 
is opinion. 

At the Surrey Sessions three women have been sentenced to penal 
ervitude — one to seven years and two to five years each — for a brutal 
ignway robbery. They attacked an unoffending woman whose husband 
ad just stepped aside for an instant, and, having beaten her severely, 
ttempted to bite her fingers off in order to obtain possession of her 
rags. 
A boy, nine years of age, was left at home in Sheffield, Eng., to take 
are of bis little baby sister. He tried to set her clothes on fire ; failing 
a this, he began cutting her throat with a carving knife. The neighbors 
ortunately came to the rescue, when the barbarous wretch attempted to 
ang himself, being black in the face when cut down. 
Three children near Spinal, France, drank an entire bottle of brandy 
vithin an hour. The youngest, aged 13, died within an hour, the next. 
6 years old, died in three hours, the third, aged 17, recovered in time to 
ttend the funeral of his companions. 

The question whether the government shall get anything from the 
irofits of the centennial exhibition, instead of their all going to the pri- 
ate stockholders, is to be carried up to the full bench of the Supreme 
Jourt. 
At the close of 1875, the number of sheep in Australia was 63,847.- 
19 ; of cattle there were 6,884,527 ; the horses had increased to a iniluon, 
nd three millions and a half of acres were under cultivation. 



Fechter's daughter has appeared on the stage in Paris. This is bet- 
er than to have Fecbter over here. 



WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 



CUTTER WHISKY. 

Al', llotutink' A <«>.. No. IS] Jiirk-im -trrtt. i»r« lh«- *nlc 
• \ 

. 

of "J ii i ui Owing to 

rved reputation, vmrioui unprincipled | palm oil 

ipurloui padV - it ta roaQj tiu Ban Wumi In lot i oiled States M«i 

A. M. OILMAN, 

Importer aud WbOlCMlC LlCJBOY l>cnlcr, 30* <tiUI»riiLn 
Kino I uge *4 

1830, Old Portw uid sparkling Wlnat.etc Agent for tin 

- I ill r BLANC CHAMPAGNE Bolt Agent tot MILLS' STOMACH 
BITT I KS. M-..T i 

J. H. CUTTER OLD BOURBON. 

("1 P. Moorman A Co.. Manufacturers, I,oolnvlllc. Ky,... 
j% Hi known Boom i- represented here bj the undendgni 

ban been appointed their Sole taenia ror the Pacific I 
July 3. \ v iiotuiv-a CO., Itt anddU Jaolawnstnee, B. F. 

J. H. CUTTER'S OLD BOURBON AND RTE WHISKY, 

Minitif HcturtMl by Milton J. Hardy A Co., Noiin-lii-l.nw nnd 
Bucoawon ol J. H. CI rii-.i:. LoulaviUi . }<■.. i: MARTIN fcCO., 

August 14. No. 408 Front street. Sole Amenta for the Pacific Coast 



D 



JOHN BUTLER. 
ealer in \» in.-, mill Liquor*. English Ales nnd Porli-r, T 
Butter Street and 606 Market struct, San Francisco. Jan. 87. 



BROKERS. 



B. C LIOOKKR, TlloMA.-* liAKlUNCR, 

Member S. P. Stock ami Exchange Board. Late of the Sacramento " UliUm." 

GAi. DINER & HOOKER. 

Clommlwilon stork Brokers, :t:ir, i»in«- street, north aide, one 
j dwr below Montgomery , Ban Francisco, Cal. liuy and scl! only on comml ion 
Liberal advances made on active accounts. Dec 28, 

REMOVAL! 

JW. Brown A Co., Stock and Money Brokers, have re- 
« moved to No. :^17 Montgomery .^trL-i.'i, Nevada Block, 
J. w. Brown. Member s. F stock and Exchange Board. Jan 8. 



J. E. 8. Latham.] LATHAM & KING, [Hombr S. Ktko. 

SnvceHMorN to JnincM II. I.m(1i;iiii .V Co., Stock and Money 
Brokers, 411 California street, San Francisco, Member S.F. Stock anal Exchange 
Board. Stocks bought and carried on margins. Aug. 12. 

HUBBARD & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers. 331 1-2 Montgomery street, nn- 
der Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco, will transact business through the 
San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board. July 17. 

E. P. PECKHAM, 
(Commission Stock Broker and Member S. F. Stock I'.x- 

* J change, 413 California street. Stocks bought, sold and carried. Liberal ad- 
vances made on active accounts. Orders receive prompt execution and return, 
[June. 19.] 



l>. M. Hosmrr.] 



H0SMEB & BOURNE, 



tJ B. BOI'IINK. 



Stock Brokers. 116 Ifalleck street, San Francisco. I'ost- 
office Addrcs*, Lock box lax. March Z&. 

KEMOVAL. 

Lovelaud. I>avid A Co., from 108 LeidesdorfT street to No. 
481 California street, comer Lcidcsdorff. Feb. 26. 

B. F- ft N. P. E. R. 

('uiaici'ofTiine. — On and after Satnrday. February 10th, 
j the steamer JAMES M. DONAHUE, Captain w. Warner, will leave Washington 
Btreel wharf, dafly(Suudaya included), at 3 p.m., connecting at Donahue with eara 
for Cloverdalc and intermediate stations. Connection made at Fulton with the 
Fulton and Ciuernville Branch to Korbel's Mills and the Great Bcdwood Forests. 
The train leaves Cloveruale daily (Sundays included), at 8 a. m., connecting with 
Bteamer at Donahue for Sen Francisco. Close connections made with Btagea for Bo- 
fi< m i.i, the I leyaers, Dklata, Clear Lake, Mendocino, Mark West, Skaggs' and Littons* 
Sorinffs. Freight received on wharf from 7 a.m. to 2:80 P.M, Sunday Trips- DntH 
further notice, the stwmier will leave Washingtnn-st Wharf even" Sunday at 3 P.M. for 

Cloverdale and way stations. General ottiee, 420 Montgomen street. 

A. A. BEAN. Superintendent. 1*. DONAHUE, President. 

P. E. DOUGHERTY. Geii'l Pas. A: Ticket Agent. 

Notice.— Chanoe of Wharf.— On and after SATURDAY, February luth, 1*77, the 
Bteamer JAMES M. DONAHUE will leave Washington-street Whart Feb. 10. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Original Comstock tiold and Silver JVinlu^ Company.— 
location of principal place ol business, Sao Francisco, California Location 
..[ works, storey county, Nevada. Notice is hereby given, that at a meeting ol the 
Board ol Directors, held on the 5th day of February, 1877, an assessment (No. 1) of 
60 cents per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the oilice of the Company, 
330 Pine street, San Francisco, California Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 5th day of March, ls77, will he delinquent, and adver- 
tised for Bale at public auction, and unless payment is made before, will be swld on 
TUESDAY, the 20th day pi March, 1877, to pay the delinquent assessment, together 
with costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

THOMAS E. ATKINSON. Secretary. 
Office— 330 Pine street, San Francisco, California. February 10. 

NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers and I>eaIerNin Painters' Materlnls, Tlonse, Sijru 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hanger? and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jvekson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 

THOMAS DAY, 

Importer of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Gill. 
Steel and Bronze^ and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 aud 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Jan. 27. 

E. W. SPRAGTJE, M.D., 
Post street, corner Kearny. Office Hours, 10 to 12: 2 to 

4 ; 7:30. Diseases of Throat and Lungs a specialty. February 10. 



30 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. L7, 1877. 



THE CITY PRISON AND HOSPITAL. 

We are glad to notice that the utterly disgraceful condition of the 
City Prison and the Hospital attached has at last attracted the attention 
of the authorities. The report of the Health and Police Committee of 
the Board <>f Supervisors, presented on Monday, contains an allusion to 
the overcrowded condition of the Prison Hospital, and states, moreover, 
that the " Urgent Necessity " Fund being exhausted, there exist no 
means for supplying the City Prison with the necessary drugs, etc., for 
the patients under his care. The Committee do not offer any suggestions 
for the amelioration or remedying of this distressing condition of affairs; 
but simply represent it for the consideration of the Board of Supervisors. 
Judging from the ordinary examples of the names in which the public 
business is usually transacted by these talented Solons. we should imagine 
that the matter will receive their attention about the same time that the 
Washington monument is completed, unless they should be alarmed into 
action by the breaking out of some fngutiul pestilence. Situated in the 
low lying part of the city, badly drained, ill ventilated, and of dimensions 
totally inadequate to the requirements of the place, the City Prison is a 
deformity and disgrace to San Francisco, and should have been years ago 
superseded by a building more in consonance with modern ideas, and in 
keeping with the surroundings. It is monstrous that a city possessing so 
many fine structures should be disfigured and discredited with the exist- 
ence of such a dirty, unsightly charnel-house, suggestive of the worst 
days of Newgate or the Marshalsea. It is approached by a dirty alley 
abounding with liquor saloons, snrrounded by the habitations of the vi- 
cious and criminal of both sexes, who regard it as a haven of refuge, where 
they can be lodged and fed when out of luck, and is altogether unclean 
and demoralizing. Perhaps the worst feature of the whole business is 
the dens in which persons arrested and awaiting examination before the 
magistrate, are confined. The imagination of the painter Dure - has never 
conceived any " inferno " that can surpass or even equal these fearful 
realities. They consist of three dark, cellar-like caverns, hewn out in 
the basement, about twenty feet square, and dimly lighted by gas jets in 
the bare outside. Iron bars separate the dungeon from the outer build- 
ing, and the whole vicinity is dark and noisome. Into these dens are 
thrust promiscuously men, women and children— the ruffianly desperado, 
or hoodlum, taken red-handed in the commission of murder; the foul- 
mouthed and ribald drunkard, male or female, and the child of tender 
years, whom example or hunger has forced into crime. Hereon the filthy 
floor, just barely distinguishable in the uncertain light, they all lie — a vile 
and heterogeneous mass of criminality, the air resounding with oaths and 
curses. Not un frequently some wretch, maddened by drink, makes a 
ferocious attack upon his fellow -prisoners, and the most horrible scenes are 
of constant occurrence. It is not uncommon for respectable persons, per- 
fectly innocent of any offense, to be arrested by our police and confined in 
these loathsome dens upon the most frivolous and unwarrantable 
charges, until the moraing, when they are dismissed without even an 
apology for the indignity and horrible ordeal they have had to suffer. 
Some radical and speedy change in this matter is imperatively necessary. 
There are amongst the community many able, energetic and competent 
men who will not be content that such a blot as the present City Prison 
should continue to exist, and to them we confidently look for the remedy. 
We feel sure that any expenditure which may be needful to remove the 
Prison, or at any rate, the Hospital, and to substitute for the present 
" calaboose " something a little less like the lair of a wild beast, will be 
cordially indorsed by the taxpayers. 

HARRY GEORGE AND THE "POST." 

An ungracious and ungrateful attack irpon the Post, its managers, 
and its principal proprietor, which bears the distinctive ear-marks of 
Harry George, appears in a daily sheet. It falsely claims that the Post 
"made a success" under George's management. It indecently, presump- 
tuously, and without evidence, asserts that the public had confidence in 
his "honesty of purpose, 1 ' and that the paper was then a power in the 
land. In that condition it is alleged that the gentleman who held a 
majority of the stock determined upon "filing out the real founders of the 
paper." Now all this is untrue, and basely ungrateful in the extreme, 
i'he Post, so far from a success, was the deadest of dead failures. It was 
running behind every week, the salaries of the employe's were largely in 
arrear, its influence was as little as the soul and much less than the body 
of its undersized editor. Its utterances were little puffs of wind, which, 
like the snaps of a popgun, attracted notice by their souud, but bred con- 
tempt by their utter ineffectiveness. Senator Jones, with that generosity 
that is peculiar to him, and in a moment of sympathy with a better man 
than the insignificant George, put his money into the concern, and with- 
out really serving his friend, kept on losing it as fast as he put it in. This 
went on for a long while — much too long, indeed ! Unless there came a 
change, it was apparent the paper must die. George never was and never 
can be other than a newspaper-killer. He strangled the last Herald, and 
he murdered the Sacramento Reporter, as Governor Haight knows to his cost, 
and if he did not bury the Post,*it was because of the change which he now 
indecently and unjustly assails. He says " the present manager has a very 
dirty job to accomplish. " Be that as it may, for we know not to what George 
refers, the present manager is accomplishing his "job " in a very cleanly 
way, and what is better, lie is accomplishing it. He is making the paper 
bright, readable and pecuniarily successful. No doubt his fault in 
George's eyes is his success. He is producing a paper that has tone, spirit 
and substance to it. It adheres to its friends, faithfully serves the public 
and is respected. In George's days it was a nondescript thing, neither 
fish, flesh, fowl, nor good red herring. It sold its friends, fleeced the man 
who generously came to its rescue, for which he is now roundly abused, 
and though it lost money for everybody else, it was made somehow or 
the other to bring more profit to George than he had ever previously de- 
rived from any other source. He is now a gas measurer. Fitting em- 
ployment ! If beyond being a paper-killer he was ever anything more 
useful than a mere gas-bag, we have failed to discover it. He was a swollen 
out piece of pomposity, who, untrue to his friends, false to his country 
and an unbeliever in the party he uses, is now almost lost to view in a fat 
office, which he neither deserves nor adorns. Really a cockney Austra- 
lian, he deceives those who don't know by sticking a feather out of the 
American eagle in his tail. His days of ephemeral prominence have 
passed and gone forever, and he is now unworthy of any attention save 
this bad notice for his basely ungrateful attack upon his most beneficent 
benefactor. 



EUROPEAN AFFAIRS. 

"When "Our Own Correspondent" has nothing new to communi- 
cate he usually telegraphs that Russia has ordered a fresh mobilization of 
her army corps. It would seem as if this mobilization were somewhat 
in the nature of Penelope's web, put together one day and disbanded the 
next, for the number of times this mobilization has been asserted would 
have embraced the whole population from the Black Sea to the Amooi 
river. Much surmise has arisen as to the capability of Russia to support 
a prolonged and exhaustive war. The extent of her territory and the 
necessity of protecting her frontiers require an army of itself, whilst her 
lines of railways, all constructed by the Government, are a continual 
drain upon its resources. At the same time it was a remarkable fact that 
when the Czar called upon his people to come forward and subscribe to the 
voluntary loan the Russian people of all classes of society and of all creeds 
hastened to place their money at the disposal of the Government, and that 
in reality the loan was taken up by the two cities of Moscow and St. 
Petersburg. To such an extent was this spontaneous response carried 
that a journal of the country exclaimed that the women of Russia would 
proffer their jewels should the Emperor demand them. Herein lies the 
paradox. The bitter animosity of the various sects is merged in the filial 
love of the subject, for in order to give an idea of the confusion that 
might arise in case of war it is only necessary to enumerate some of the 
varied religious creeds that exist in the empire. There are in Russia 
some ten or twelve millions that belong to the strict orthodox Greek 
church, and these again are divided into two sects, those who have popes, 
or papas, as they call them, and those who simply follow the simple rites 
of the church. The former are to a certain extent hypocrites, for whilst 
from fear of the police and from interested motives affecting orthodoxy 
they nevertheless maintain relations with their own priests, and these 
latter have a metropolitan known only to the privileged who is supposed 
to reside in Bohemian Austria. The Spasow-chinas are another sect who 
believe in the reign of Antichrist and say that he is now on earth and 
present in the agents of the Government. They believe only in the sac- 
rament of baptism and salvation by prayer. Other sects renounce all 
sacraments excepting that of marriage ; others, again, preach the sacrifice 
of suicide ; others the old theory of mortification of the flesh, and the 
"brotherhood of Adam" are only allowed to possess money from which 
the image of authority is effaced. The sect of the "infanticides" think 
it their duty to people Heaven with souls without sin and kill young 
children in order, as they say, to make angels of them, whilst the 
" stranglers" believe that a violent death is a sure passport to Paradise. 
This last sect has over a million of followers, the majority of whom rarely 
arrive at the age of twenty years, consequently they are hardly to be met 
with in the army. The " prophets" and the " scourgers " abstain from 
wine, liquor and tobacco, abjure marriage and preach abortion. At cer- 
tain seasons they meet together, strip entirely naked, and give themselves 
up to stupendous orgies. The Scoptes, or "mutilators," go even to greater 
excesses than the " prophets," and their doctrine is so gross and absurd 
that thousands of them have been lately banished to Siberia. One of the 
most singular, however, is called the sect of Napoleon. It dates from 
1820, and its followers adore the bust of the first Napoleon, to whom 
they pay divine honors. All these sects have their origin in the gross 
ignorance of the people. They hate one another with the bitterness of 
savages, and yet are united on one point, their veneration for the Czar. 
Herein lies the strength of Russia, and if war with Turkey does take 
place it will not be so much for the cause of Christianity as in obedience 
to the call of the chief, whilst on the side of the Sultan will be ranged 
Moslem fanaticism, Greek jealousy, Catholic loathing, and the general re- 
pression of foreign invasion. It is hardly yet time to judge whether the 
Porte and its newly appointed Prime Minister will carry out the prom- 
ised reforms. Such radical changes cannot be effected by a stroke of the 
pen, and it yet remains to be seen whether Turkey will not gracefully efl 
feet that of her own free will which she would not accord to the combined I 
urgency of the European Powers. 

MR~HILL'S LAST PICTURES. 

Certainly no picture ever painted by Thomas Hill, the artist, has at- 
tracted the attention which the portrait of his son, now on exhibition at ' 
No. 20 Post street, is exciting. No one ever looks for portraits from Mr. 
Hill, and yet he quietly produces a picture which for tone, color, breadth 
of treatment, expression, and detail, puts in the shade all portraits we 
have hitherto seen in San Francisco. The subject is his little six-year-old 
boy— little Tiff — carressing a collie, or sheep-dog, which is looking fondly 
up into its young masters face. The background consists of a growing 
field of green corn, with here and there an intrusive poppy. The boy is 
dressed in a suit of warm gray, with quiet purple stockings, all in per* 
feet harmony with the background, and set off by the dun-colored coat of 
the dog by his side. But it is the superb fresh coloring of the face, and 
the natural wave of the golden hair, which is the chief charm of the pic- 
ture, and that — to be appreciated — must be seen. The dog is an admirable 
piece of drawing and color, and it is no exaggeration tu rank it with some 
of Landseer's animals. Another picture by Mr. Hill is also on exhibition, 
which is as different from his ordinary style as is the portrait. He does 
not tell us where the scene is laid, but, if we mistake not, the view is on 
the Alviso Creek, on the old bay route to San Jose. The bold treatment 
of the clouds, and of the far-off corn-fields, is a divergence from Mr. Hill's 
usually too careful brush, and a happy one. A sloop is coming up the 
creek, and in the foreground some hunters are shooting ducks, three of 
which are on the wing, and flying across the creek. The subject is ad- 
mirably handled, and boldly treated. The two pictures, so utterly dis- 
tinct from anything Mr. Hill has previously done, form a new epoch in 
his career as an artist. 

Our Quacks. —The medical frauds who still continue to practice their 
horrible calling have their signs on our streets and scatter broadcast their 
circulars. Runners of these villains will be fouml to infest the steamer 
landings, and are in all parts of the city waiting for their prey. Some of 
these, such as Spinney, Flattery, Luscomb, O'Donnell, and hundreds of 
others, seem to taunt the public in the most brazen manner, announcing 
with perfect nonchalance that they are robbers and abortionists, vaunting 
oyer their success in " sending to'Hell " their quota of the mortals of this 
Ifbrld, Can it be possible that there are not sufficient numbers of public 
spirited medical men in this State to take in hand this very serious mat- 
ter? The Medical Society, as now constituted, is impotent, caring so lit- 
tle for the welfare of its profession that it has even given a license to » 
partner of " Dr." Spinney. 





EJ5P 1 ; 

CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




Oitlce— OO? to OlS Merchant Street. 



VOLUXE 81 



SAN FRANCISCO. FEBRUARY 17. 1677. 



NUM2ER 4 



BIZ. 



Business in i U departments i* more than usually quiet Trade is dull, 
U this in khe nee of an unusual plethora ol money. The 
monetary nstekyoira mem to be full and running over, and yet we find no 
disposition abroad to operate in foods, war,- or merchandise. t lash, 
■ plentiful upon gilt-edged securities, and yet no one seems inclined 
r upon ventures of any description. " Why i* this?" is the qui ry 
. ,|. There seems to be, first, a want of confidence. 
We all desire to Bee tin- Presidential question settled, and we wan) more 
rain to secure full h\ • rag ci >ps; dispose of these two aU-absnrbing ques- 
■i-l then we think business w ill soon assume n more cht ei ful aspect, 
ded imprpi tment can be expected until the bulls and bears of 
California street are quieted down and operators content to Let the bo- 
and mine owners work their way out of threatened ditfi- 
cnltie . 
Freights to the United Kingdom have taken an upward flight onr- 
week, with quite a number of Grain Charters concluded at en- 
hanced] ken for Cork, U. K., at £2 5s.@£27s. 6d. 
To the Continent, £2 L0e.@£2 12s. 6d To Liverpool, or a direct port, 
I'. K., we quote huge wooden carriers £2 2s. 6d., and for British iron 
ships £2 As. Not lees than twelve ships For Wheat and Flour have been 
secured for Great Britain the past week, yet leaving 17 ships in port 
. 
TheTeasaleof Thursday at tlu' auction lomiy ..f S. I,. Jones A Co., 
the importation of C. A. Low A Co., was not altogether a - 
The attendance w a small and the bidding far from being spirited. Terms 
all Bums under 8300 net cash; over$3t)0, 90 days for ap- 
. payable in gold coin, or 3 percent, discount for cash. The 
arly all of ttiu well known Diamond " L" brand. The 

..but only about two-thirds sold, as follows : 

300 hi. chests Japan, each 60 J-lb. papers, Soung Hyson, Bold al 32a; 4(H) 

D.30] tb. papers, same, at 32c.; 600 mats, each 4 5-lb. flow- 

uung Hyson, 32c ; 10 mats, each 2 10 It., flowered boxes, do . 

i 30-lb. bulk, Young Hyson, 2S£@29c.; 10 hf. chests, 

j tbs. bulk, Toons Hyson, 26c.; 300 hi", chests, each ''•<> '. Ed. papers, 

Japan Oolongs, 30c; 225 bf. chests, each 30 L-lb. papers, Oolong, 30(S 

■ li I 5-lb. flow ei d es, Ooloi , 30c, The balance 

• it thi Bsed, prices not satisfactory considering the superior 

of the Tea, 

Kerosene Oils. - A very important and unlooked for decline may be 

D ie's Brilliant oils, which toot place on the 15th 

inst Tht decline being 5c V gallon in cans, we now quote the price at 

i . For Brilliant, Nonpariel Inc., Astral, 45c, 

Coffee. -On Tuesday an invoice "f about 1,000 bags Boyntine "Java" 

Id at auction byj3. L. Jones & Co. al Lfi ■■ I -' i h nich ■■ 

d dine over previous like offerings. The arrivals of Coffee during 

the week under review have been liberal, including some 2,000 bags per 

City "i Tokio, same description as that above noted : also 6,226 bags < len- 

ii, per steamship City of San Francisco. The marl i - 

primi (ireen Coffees is measurably firm yet inactive, within tin,* ran :e of 
m 22c. 
Spices.— Some 500 bags Sinuapor- Black Pepper was offered at auction 

and sole in part at 13^ 
Candles. -- Our local factories are not inclined to give up tin* field to 
■ arufacturere. Sales of 2,000 bxs 12 ounce Adamant 
' J »nes&Co." at 9A@10£c; Harkness 1 Patent Wax, 19A@20c: Werk's 
Steari i Acid, 16 (3 I8|c. 

Case Goods. — Sales of 2,000 cs < Oregon Ml. ( lysters, for forward deliv- 
i istern account, atSl 52£ I- i 

Borax:— We have no change in price to note. Tlie Berkshire, for 
Liverpool, carried 74,428 h\s 

Quicksilver. --There has been quite an unexpected large export de- 
mand fcr Hongkong, during one single purchase, of 2,000 flasks, besides 
others to go forward per Belgic; price, 4oc. The Newbem, for Mexican 
ports, carried 150 flasks. 

Ores and Orcbilla.-- We note upon the market samples of Esing- 
glass, lar^e, transparent sheets, and of superior quality, from a new and 
recently discovered mine, some one hundred miles From this city. It is 
valuable. The Bhip Berkshire, for Liverpool-, carried 2,100 ctls Copper 
Ore and 107 ctls Silver Ore, besides 884 bales Mexican Orehilla. 

The Ha-niian Trade with this port appears to be very steadily if not 
rapidly augmenting. The Treaty seems to have given quite an impetus 
to the Islanders. The steamship City of Sydney on her last trip over 



brought as 4,748 pkgs Sugar, 79 bags Coffee, AM bunches Bananas, etc., 
and in return therefor we have dispatched four sailing vessels to Bono 
lulu within a week. The barks D. 0. Murray, H. W. Almy, Legal 
Tender and W, H. Almy, all with full cai « [eneral mercnai 

some passengers and • »me 160,000 in treasure. Prom II lulu i 

advised of an active demand for Sugars, and that the Bav Refinery is there, 
through it.-- agents, offering to buy Sugar at one cent p lb. more than the 
< !alifornia Refinery contracted mouths ago for several million pounds. This 

and other circumstances have instilled new life into the Island planters, 
and they are now increasing their area for Sugar, Coffee and Rice culti- 
vation ;iud ut the same time sending us large quantities of 1 -.ananas and 
other products in quantities. 

Rice. — Imports of i Shina have been heavy for some time past, with a 
I demand, at prices rutin 1 ,' from 5 to 6c Japan and Hawaiian 

Tab!-- continue in fair request, within the same range Of price. 

Bags and Bagging. — Stocks are large and the demand light. Sales 
of 22x36 Wheat sacks are reported at8§@8c. The suspended Bag firm of 
E. Detrick ft Co. have* made an amicable settlement with their creditors, 
and have resumed operations a-- heretofore at their Clay-street factory. 



Sugar and Syrups. —The price of all "White Refined isl3i@13ic; 
Hawaiian, 74@n*£c, according to quality; Refined Yellow, 9|@lljc. 
The Navigator, for Hamburg, has 1,500 bids Golden Syrup, say 48,5110 galls. 

' ' Bringing Coals to Newcastle. "— We learn that the United States 
Government has now en route to this port from New York several hun- 
dred barrels -A Mess Beef for the EJ. S. Navy. A better article could be 
bought here for less money than this will cost, and at the same time ours 
will be the best and cheapest. 

Flour and Wheat. —Oregon is now sending us her surplus Flour to 
compete with local mills. The Starr Mills, Vallejo, are now loading a 
ship for Liverpool, while the Golden Gate, Golden Vge and other city 
mills are busy turning out choice extras, se'liny at S'O'Sill 50 fc? bbl; Super- 
line, So 50 for standard brands. Wheat. — Large purchases for export 
have been made during the week within the range of SI 95@2 I 1 ctl. for 
Pair, $2 05 for Choice White. Some 250,000 ctls. Choice changed hands 
at ■ ■'- 02-J(5 2 05 1 > ctl., the market closing firm. 

Barley and Oats, --There is rather more tone to the market for 
Choice Bright Brewing Barley, with sales at 81 25(31 35^ ctl. Oats 

from Oregon sell freely at $2(a 2 25. 

Corn and Rye —We note an improved demand for Corn, with sales at 
si 25(5 1 30, gold. Rye is in req test at %l 75*@2 V ctl., gold. 

Hay and Bran. —We quote the former at $10(5 15 [,? ton; the latter at 
$16. 

Potatoes and Onions.— The market is flooded with the former at i@ 

y<', t-lb.; the latter at v^ I e. $ fl). for choice. New crop Potatoes are 

now arriving quite freely, and so also are Tomatoes. Asparagus and Green 
now appearing in the vegetable market. 

Hops are quite plentiful at 18(5j 20c. for g I to choice. 

Hides. -The demand for Dry is good at 17(g 17$c. ; Wet Salted, 8@9c. 

WooL —The market is quiet at present, with small sales I'loece at 
17@18c, 

Butter and Cheesa. — The I 'dry supply is large and free. Choice 
fresh grass Butter in rolls, 285j 30c; ( Sheese, 12(5 Lbc. Egg- are plentiful 
at 30c. 

Oranges and Apples. —The market is fully supplied with both. Los 
Angeles Oranges sell at $10(2 35 \,< M., according to size. Apples, $1 25<§ 
1 5(i |.' Imx for good tu choice. 

Coal. -There is more tone to the market for cargoes to arrive from 
England and Australasia. Spot price of Wallsendj $& 

Coffee Imports, 1877.— The total imports up to date in this year are 
far in excess of those in the corresponding period of 187'i, viz : 

1877— Bafiw. 1S76 -Bags. 

( lentral American 10,411 2,459 

Other kinds 5,982 410 



Total 16,393 2,875 

Costa Rica Coffee. —A portion of recent invoices received of the new 
crop were highly colored, and were not appreciated by consumers on this 
coast. 



Brazil Coffee. --The last Panama steamer brought up from the 
Isthmus 849 bags Rio Coffee, 113,000 lbs., and which is now upon the 
market at 22c. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO KEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 17, 1877. 



CONDENSED NEWS OF THE WEEK. 

LOCAL. 

Saturday, February 10th.— Dickie Brothers are building, at then- 
shipyard in Mission bay, a propeller for the Mexican axithorities, to be 
stationed at Mazatlan.— Frank P. Coakly, the individual who was 
arrested for vagrancy and put up $100 in gold coin as bail money, was 
tried in the City Criminal Court and acquitted.— —The Ladies' United 
Hebrew Benevolent Society realized 81,800 from the twenty-tirst anniver- 
sary ball recently given in aid of its funds.— In the case of Belc-our vs. 
the French Savings and Loan Society, Judge Wheeler has rendered judg- 
ment for plaintiff for $2,215 45. 

Sunday, 11th. —Joseph Lynch is under arrest charged with attempt- 
ing to stab a woman in a grocery store on Seventh street, near Fnlsom. 
—The City of Tokio brought 123 Chinese passengers.— The Chairman 
of the Finance Committee has notified the attorneys in the Registration 
Inquiry that they must conclude their cases on Tuesday evening next, as 
the Committee desire to make their report to the Board. 

Monday, 12th.— The Supervisors intend to give the Chinese as a 
burying ground six acres near the center of Laurel Hill Cemetery, in full 
view of the Cliff House road.— —The work of driving piles for a new- 
wharf at the foot of Jackson street, to conform with the new arrange- 
ment of the water front, has been begun.— =-There are 369 Chinese laun- 
dries in this city, which give employment to about 3,500 washermen. 

Tuesday, 13th. —The track of the Central Railroad Company has 
been taken up on Davis street, beyond Jackson, and continued down 
Jackson and Washington streets to the water front, and thence to the 
ferry landing.— The charges of assault to murder against John Guilfoyle 
and James G-. Hayden, the men charged with assaulting Captain Thomas 
F. Baines in December last, were again continued till Friday, February 
23d.—— On motion of Joseph P. Hoge, seconded by Walter Van Dyke, 
the Fourth District Court adjourned out of respect to the memory of the 
late Samuel F. Reynolds. 

Wednesday, 14th. — C. D. Crossman is on trial in the Municipal 
Criminal Court on indictment for embezzling a horse and buggy.— —The 
case of Peter Bauer vs. Henry Matthews has been dismissed by the 
Fifteenth District Court by stipulation.— -The total rainfall for the 
season thus far, according to the record of Resident Signal Observer 
Bealls, is 9.29 inches.— — Health Officer Dr. Meares reports 641 deaths in 
the city during January. 

Thursday, 15th. —The habeas corpus case in regard to the little boy 
Miller, whose father, Wilson S. Miller, avers that he is wrongfully held 
by his mother, was continued to-day in the Fourth District Court until 
Saturday morning.^— The first term of the School of Design opened to- 
day. The attendance of pupils was large.— —The commission suit of 
Eugene McCarthy vs. Seth Pinkbam, was again on trial before a jury to- 
day in the Fourth District Court. 

Friday, 16th, — Antonia Apponig, the young German woman who 
killed Josephson, has been acting in a strange manner as if she was insane. 
^— A meeting of the Chamber of Commerce was held this afternoon to 
consider the advisability of petitioning Congress to grant the same sub- 
sidy to the Occidental and Oriental Steamship Company as is granted to 
the Pacific Mail Company.— —Biggs, the would-be suicide, is walking 
about the prison with two bullets in his brain, in apparently the best of 
health. . 

TELEGRAPHIC. 

Saturday, February 10th. —It is arranged by the Democrats that 
objections, signed by at least five Senators and five Representatives, shall 
be interposed against the immediate counting of the Florida vote.— A 
party of Indians, supposed to be Cheyennes, made an attack on Chase's 
ranches, on Horse creek, thirty miles north of Cheyenne.— -Eph Hol- 
land was arraigned to-day to answer the charge of being implicated in 
fradulent voting in the October election. 

. Sunday, Uth. —The Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad 
has settled with the widow of L. C. Crain, killed at Ashtabula, for 
85,175.— The steamship Bavaria, which was burned at sea on the 6th, 
sailed from New Orleans January 28th. The vessel and cargo are valued 
at about half a million.— —The Mexican steamer Maurice, with Vera 
Cruz dates to the 8th, reached the mouth of the Rio Grande this morning, 
having on board General Miguel Blanco, who has been appointed by Diaz 
Military Commander of the Frontier. 

Monday, 12th. —The extradition of William J. Sharkey, the murderer 
who escaped from the city prison in 1873, while under sentence of death, 
is again to be demanded from Spain under the treaty just made with that 
country.— A pastoral letter from Bishop O'Hara, excommunicating the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians, and directing the clergy to deny the mem- 
bers of that order the sacraments, was read in the Catholic churches of 
Scranton Diocese on Sunday.— Gfneral Crook has returned from Camp 
Sheridan, where he has been several days. 

Tuesday, 13th. —At the meeting of the Electoral Commission to-day 
Thurman was absent, owing to sickness, and after a delay of fifteen min- 
utes the Senator arrived. Ten minutes later the argument was begun by 
Senator McDonald, who supposed the objections to the Hayes certifi- 
cates from Louisiana.— —The Democrats' purpose of interposing objec- 
tions to the Illinois votes was abandoned after consultation among the 
leaders of the party because the Senate's inevitable decision would 
merely facilitate a decision by the Electoral Commission against similar 
objections as to the eligibility of Watts or the two alleged ineligible 
Electors of Louisiana. 

Wednesday, 14th. —A Trenton firm has purchased the hull of Com- 
modore Perry's flagship, the Laivrence, and intend to manufacture canes 
and other relics from the timbers. ^—Fred May has arrived in New York 
and appeared openly on the streets. There was no action taken on ac- 
count of the duel.— William Beach Lawrence advises the Democrats 
on the Commission to resign, and gives reasons for believing that the 
Commission is unconstitutional.— —The Tribune's Washington corre- 
spondent says Maddox was arrested six times during the war by Stanton 
and imprisoned in the old Capitol Prison. 



Thursday. 15th.-- A bill has been drafted to meet substantially the 
recommendations of the President in'his recent special message with re- 
gard to early specie payments. — The report of the Silver Commission 
will not be ready for presentation to Congress to-morrow, as required by 
last month's concurrent resolution. About noon to-day Governor 
Packard was shot in the knee by an assassin. Tb* party who did the 
shooting was fired upon by the bystanders and wounded in the arm. 

Friday, 16th. — The man who tried to kill Governor Packard says that 
his name is William Henry Weldon, and that his home is in Philadelphia. 
He says he has a mother and sisters living there. With regard to his at- 
tempt to kill Packard he says there were four others with him, who were 
to have assisted him in the undertaking, but that when they reached the 
State House they refused to go in and left him to carry out the intended 
plan of assassination alone.-— A dispatch from Lieutenant Hannah, 
who is now scouting in the southern part of the Territory, in the imme- 
diate vidnity of where Indian depredations are said to have been com- 
mitted, reports nothing to confirm the news of a massacre of Mexicans, 
telegraphed from Tucson on Monday. 

FOREIGxV. 

Saturday, February 10th. — Yarmouth and Lowestoft fishing vessels, 
with 200 persons on board, are missing, and vessels are searching for 
them.— Le Nord says, if Europe renounces its right of action under the 
treaty of '56, Russia will be justified in assuming the attitude she held 
before the treaty.— The Canadian Government has sent to England 
advertisements for propositions from capitalists to build the remaining 
portion of the Pacific Railway from the Red river to the Pacific ocean. 

Sunday, 11th. — Minister Ristics and the Turkish Delegate, Pertef 
EiTendi. have agreed on a basis of peace, viz., saluting the Turkish flag, 
conservation of Servian fortresses, and the prevention of armed bands 
crossing the frontier. The Servians declare it impossible to discuss the 
stipulation for granting privileges to Jews and Armenians equal to thise 
enjoyed by other Servian subjects. A decree has been issued by 
Cap tain -General Jovellar, in which, after setting forth that the war is 
resulting very advantageously to the Spaniards, he pardons all political 
prisoners. 

Monday, 12th. ~ Private advices from Kieff represent that Russia 
has ordered the railway companies to procure ambulance carriages and 
prepare to convey 60,000 men to Kicbenev (the capital of Bessarabia, 85 
miles northwest. of Odessa).—— Earl Russel has given notice to the House 
of Lords that he will move that England shall cease all diplomatic inter- 
course with Turkey, on the ground that that nation is still barbarous and 
unworthy to rank among the enlightened people of Europe. 

Tuesday, 13th. —Russian advices confirm the reports that the number 
of arrests made of Communist and Nihilist conspirators in Moscow and 
its neighborhood is increasing daily. The Russians are distributing notices 
in Poland, threatening with severe punishment all persons who join the 
Turkish army.— Uneasiness on the Stock Exchange and Paris Bourse is 
intensified by a rumor that Russia will precipitate a conflict, that negotia- 
tions with Montenegro are suspended, etc.— -Few deaths from want are 
reported near Madras. The number receiving relief has further decreased 
40,000 in Madras and 200,000 in Bombay. 

Wednesday, 14th. — It is expected that the Queen of England will 
visit Germany about Easter.— Amiedee Pichot, a French writer, is 
dead. ^— John Morgan Abbott, member of Parliament from Oldham, is 
also dead.— —The importance of the attacks on the Duke de Cazas, 
French Minister of Foreign Affairs, has been exaggerated. The Cabinet 
and majority of the Assembly are disposed to sustain him. -^Colonel 
Gordon, the African explorer, has been appointed Governor of the 
province of Soudan, 

Thursday, 15th. — Germany's determination not to participate in the 
Paris exhibition is irrevocable.— The lower house of the Reichrath 
passed a grant of 600,000 florins to promote the disylay of Austria at the 
Paris exhibition.-^— The Russian army is ready to move against the 
Turks, and numbers 120,000 infantry and 8,000 cavalry. The two corps 
at Odessa would make the total 180,000 infantry and 12,000 cavalry.— 
The Emperor of Brazil visited the Pope. He expressed a hope that the 
Pope would act in accord with the Braziban Government, and assist in 
removing all ecclesiastical difficulties. 

Friday, 16th. — Thirty corpses, frightfully mutilated, so far have been 
recovered from the coal mine Graissessac, in France.— A terrible boiler 
explosion occurred at Barro, in the steel works in St. Etienne, France, 
to-day. Several workmen were killed and many badly injured.— The 
semi-official journals declare that any serious variance which may have 
existed recently between Germanyand France has passed away, as France 
has discontinued her efforts to form an alliance with Russia.— —The 
Standard's correspondent at Brindisi reports an interview with Midhat 
Pasha, in course of which the latter pressed the opinion that there would 
be no war. 

From Calcutta, per Compta.— This vessel, to Messrs. Dickson, 
De Wolf & Co., brings for cargo 6,500 bags Linseed to the Oil Mill, 652 
bags Saltpetre for Powder Works, 200 bales Jute to the Oakland Bag 
Factory, 633 bales Gunny Cloth, 286 bales Gunny Bags and 696 bales 
Potato" Gunnies, 209 cases' ShtUac, 50 bags Ginger, etc. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMsHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's steamers will sail as follows at 13 M.: 
CITY OF TOKIO, March 1st, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG. 

CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, February 16th, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, call- 
ing at MAZATLAN, SAN BLA3, MANZANILLO and ACAPULCO, connecting at Ac- 
apulco with company's steamer fur all Mexican and Central American ports south of 
Acapulco. Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale. 

CITY OF SYDNEY, February 23th, at 12 o'clock, noon, or on arrival of the En- 
glish mails, for HONOLULU, 'KANDAVAU, AUCKLAND, SYDNEY" and PORT 
CHALMERS. To Sydney or Auckland— Upper Saluou, §210; Lower Saloon, §200. 

DAKOTA, Feb. 20th; CITY OF PANAMA, March 10th, and alternately on the 10th, 
20th and 30th of each month, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, TA- 
COMA and OLYMPIA, connecting' at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for 
PORTLAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing. 
For frci"-lit or passage apply at the office, comer of First and Erannan streets. 

February 17/ WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents. 



IT, 1877. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



HIS SATANIC MAJ:s:Y, ATTER THE tNlTSU.M. LUXURY OF A 
TURKISH BATH, OROWi ORACUIAB. 

■i ' M • cloth n ..f enul ! 

ii iui/t-I, oh! WVH, it" they ilo th y mutt! 
th the pain ! 
■ il ' I feel quite voting ag un. 
- rather undo 

■ i ted : 

dje ! 1 think the j eople Ul 
if they did, :it least then why all this i 

fa •' l. ul always makes me glad ! 
For, wh in. tho I. an: ny now its baa! 

1 . moaning, t'..-iiiu folks ato thoae who sin the most! 

Aii'l when tt - oTer, coma bo me for a good, old health? rn 
i ■. our ii ible Mayor has been sow a ■ swift, 

that valentine] Twas Ryans little -itt. 
Hallelujah Co • him a "teller 

inked below with a rebVand-white umbrella I 
" that ilk," tl 

■ their views on " i 'ity Rings," an i then just take them back ! 
There's Drucker busy on ■ book (he's been behind the 

In pamphlet form, called "What I Know Isout City Fathers 1 Means 1 M 
Did 1 tell yon how, the other night while rambling round, I Btruck 
\ "Med am - ' pi ■■. k Mrs. I made her tell ray luck! 

■ iin, Fooled round a wan 1. and mumbling might 

mined me (nil » tth a ours id pack •■' ties ! 
went "if to " Linda nail's. 11 and, tho' 'twas getting late, 
< Sailed in at " Prances 1 " just v> try her magic writing - 

They do more harm than g 1 ! 

Their proper sphere's the 'ity Jail, their diet prison food 
Mere vampires! fattening on the blood of unsuspecting fools ! 

■ their crafty tools. 
The love-sick maid, _ht. 

Tl i - .in- their victims ! these the dupes they chuckle o*er when caught'! 
zja 1 th tt Howard's " nabbed " at last, his was a frightful hoi 

■ i for Moody then : I claim bis pupils -every bou] ! 
trd lit- hails from Truckee, bnt suspected of some crime, 

iff •■ for change of air " t" some mure genial clime ! 
What's all this fuse with Reynolds for! this tangle-footed mess? 

'twould erase a saint : a perfect wilden i 
I believe in Brother J enlightened time* 

To poll a vote, or take an oath, for the man that "planks " the dimes ! 
The T gone to "pot!" since this Water Company's 

That's what they want - some small excuse for all to break their vow ! 

The idea is all that hurts them bo ! while if they should get ill. 

There's "Steinharts Essence" that will cure, if not, 'twill only kill ! 

The public should feel thankful, though ! The water's meat and drink ! 

What is a " wriggler" after all? Why kick np such a stink? 

They should be glad, and Btop their fuss; this growling every minute. 

We'll all get sick at least we ought— they say there's '* millions" in it ! 

The Company tho 1 have hurt themselves in getting Pick's poor aid— 

A Bony champion ! any cause fu helped, would be unmade! 

"But if your water's filthy, sure your whisky's still much worse" — 

s.. lectures 1 luzer, and proclaims the liquor trade a curse ! 

" lis easier far to kill the 'bugs' and purify your tanks, 

"Than banish vitriol from your blood — so says Professor Hanks. 

//e says your gin is fusil oil I Your rum an alum dram; 

Sour brandy, etc., poisonous salts ; your wine not worth a d— n ! 

A cheerful thought ! No wonder then there's suicides ! ' Tia plain 

What prompts them all ! or makes —still w-'r^j—^i many men insane ! — 

I bi ouque gone out ! Let's follow suit ! We've sat here long enough ! 

Let's la;. : aide this Turkish rig', and don some Christian stuff ! 

: m die Dog's" the nearest place ! You'll dine with me to-night? 
I crave two favors — don't talk "shop,'' and mind, don't make me — tight ! 



A WSLL-MEANI RULS WHICH NiJSDS AMENDMENT 

Our worthy Chief of Police recently adopted a rule which, though 
designed for good, may work evil. He proposes to give policemen credit 
in proportion to the number of arrests they make, and if those credits fall 
far behind those of their fellows he suggests they should be dismissed the 
force. It has undoubtedly become ne :essary to apply some Bpur to Is 
policemen, but the one proposed we feel assured will work injuriously. Al- 
ready there are signs that arrests are being made that would be much bet- 
ter avoided. It is not the number, but the quality— if we may so use the 
phrase— of the arrests which should count. Better to send one desperate 
burglar to San Quentin than to provide a hundred partially intoxicated 
victims with a night's compulsory lodging. It is infinitely more to the 
credit of a policeman to help a half-drunken man on the road to his home, 
wife and family, than it is to needlessly arrest and confine him in that 
abomination of abominations, the I 'ity Prison. If credit is to be given 
for the number of arrests, the temptation to the latter course will be irre- 
sistible. The rule applied to the London police is a very much better 
one. There every offense made known to a policeman anil committed on 
his beat, must, upon pain of dismissal, be reported by him at headquar- 
ters at the first opportunity, and if he fails to make the necessary arrest 
he receives a black mark. A large number of arrests may, indeed, be 
evidence of the worst instead of the beat qualities in an officer. He is 
the highest type of policeman whose vigilance prevents crime, and so ren- 
ders arrests unnecessary. The next highest is he who can show that 
where it was impossible to prevent the crime, the perpetrator of it was 
arrested. It is a mistaken policy to offer a premium to policemen to pro- 
voke and promote little peccadillos. The policeman who gives a good 
account of the perpetrator of every burglary, larceny or assault that has 
occurred on his beat, does well, but he whose vigilance prevents these 
things altogether, does better. Hence Chief Ellis, whose motives are not 
to be impugned, must adopt some wiser standard by which to judge a 
good officer. 



LIES OF THE DAY. 



' It** Vlnss. mkI c*n fly f»r «n.1 wtds, 



A Ha ii*« no hup, »mi i 

idtpUbllttj "i 
whfab OU i in' in all.— l.-'iii. Hhouoiiam 

i will -■■■•ii rata through i ■ ■ i 

"Am! ' la It hit last thai weak, ami in- »«|<| UkowiM, 

That a lie which la half a Hi 

! 

Hut * i< i truth i- « in.' i' 



San Francisco Lies. -- 1 

' is hashed up in San Francisco, by Jingo. «^— Thai 
tittle hope for our tool otalers, th nod with 

— ! here u e\ en teas for the tip] 

■ 'l'ii. - -That th<' only safe (and I 
chloral-hydrate. —That a zealou ial ol tight and knew thai 

. he arrested the wrong man! and a sober one 
at that.— That the recent importation from AustraJii was not badly 
woundi'd d, 1ml ma) be if he pel iste in i ii:ming against tm 

I'n.it, That 1 >r. Briggs finds that a few ounces of had, more or leas, 

are good brain f i and decidedly appetizing. ■—■■■That blue glass u an 

antidote for blue stockings and mother-in-law. —That Paul Demidoff 
likes to send autographs. " That Brother Piokering never raises hu eyes 
from the sidewalk or looks a man square in the face. 

Healdsburg Lies. - It Is not true that F. B. M. carries "his artil- 
lery ' with li it ii since that "eventful night."— That I. K. paid $80 for 
that overcoat—— That G. K. EL will noon be admitted to the bar.^— « 
That Guns has a new wagon.— That Foster and "Ferg" are training 
for a d tuble clog. — Th